+123 456 7890 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View, CA 94043

Swansea defender Angel Rangel makes diving admission

first_imgAngel Rangel has admitted he dived in an attempt to win a penalty for Swansea in their 2-1 loss to Manchester United. Rangel’s admission is refreshing, but slightly odd given that on Boxing Day he had to be separated from Callum McManaman after he angrily accused the West Brom midfielder of diving. “I had a bit of a fight with McManaman last week because he dived, but I did dive today and if it is a dive, it is a yellow card,” the Swansea defender said. “He (Darmian) did touch me, but I thought it was not a penalty.” Rangel knew he had made a mistake straight away as he did not remonstrate with Moss. In fact, he praised the referee for his decision at the time. Rangel added: “I said (to the referee): ‘Well done.’ “It wasn’t enough contact for me to go down but I was losing my balance, and I thought: ‘it is not like really cheating but I was falling already so I just tried to claim it’. It was a gamble.” Swansea thought they had claimed a point when Gylfi Sigurdsson equalised Anthony Martial’s opener, but Wayne Rooney snatched victory for United with a deft backheel in the 77th minute. Swansea could have claimed a draw at the death, but keeper Lukasz Fabianski headed wide while up for a corner at the death. “I just saw the space at the near post and then once the ball came in, I thought: ‘yeah, this looks good, let’s give it a go’ and it was close but not close enough,” the Swansea goalkeeper said. “I came on as an outfield player once in Poland when I was 17 or 18 and I scored then, but that was the only time I’ve scored before.” In the 63rd minute of the Swans’ defeat, Andre Ayew’s shot cannoned back off the bar and fell to Rangel, who took a touch before falling to the floor as Matteo Darmian approached him. The Swansea fans demanded a penalty, but Jon Moss booked Rangel for diving instead and after the match the Spaniard admitted the referee had made the right decision. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Read More »

VIDEO: Michael Essien is all of us when we watch back the Luis Suarez handball incident

first_imgA video has surfaced of Michael Essien listening to radio commentary of the Luis Suarez handball incident at the 2010 world cup, and Asamoah Gyan’s subsequent penalty miss which denied Ghana a semi final berth at the FIFA Mundial.Essien, who did not play in that competition, took out his head phones when Gyan missed the penalty, unable to continue listening, as the heartbreak and emotions all returned.Thursday 2nd July, 2020, marked ten years since that infamous night in Johannesburg.With the game locked at 1-1 and heading for extra time, a goal bound short from Dominic Adiyiah was scooped out of goal by Uruguay’s Luis Suarez.The then Ajax striker was shown a red card and Ghana awarded the penalty.Asamoah Gyan stepped up, and missed, breaking Ghanaian and African hearts.The game went into extra time and then a penalty shoot out which Ghana subsequently lost.Here is the video of Essien listening back to the game:last_img read more

Read More »

MLB’s era of ‘load management’ is just getting started

first_imgAbsent any sophisticated specificity, then, we see a general trend toward more rest. A manager might hope that sitting his third baseman on Monday will make him more effective on Tuesday, but for now it is still a hope. The hard data to support that conclusion just isn’t there yet. This is more true for position players than pitchers, whose velocity, spin rate, and spin efficiency might offer clues about his health.Still, said one MLB pitching coordinator, there’s “still a lot of work to be done.”None of this will console the fan who came to the ballpark expecting to see his or her favorite player, only to learn he got the day off because he’s played 20 games in a row. Maybe 20 games is a bit too ambitious for 2019.Cal Ripken Jr. famously holds the record for most consecutive games played, with 2,632. That record will never be broken. Entering the 2020 season, the active leader in consecutive regular-season games played is Kansas City Royals outfielder/second baseman Whit Merrifield.Merrifield has played 247 consecutive games. The same goes for the bottom of every batting order. Only four and a half players per team, on average, received enough plate appearances in 2019 to qualify for the batting title. The rest of a lineup is more of a rotating cast than ever. Except when it comes to the best of the best players, managers and general managers seem content to divide their team’s workload at the cost of individual accolades.What’s going on?Injuries are partly to blame. The number of days lost to the injured list (formerly the disabled list) shot up 24 percent among position players in the last year, according to Spotrac. For starting pitchers, IL days lost increased by 4 percent.Something else is at work, too. It’s tied directly to the collection of analytical data by major-league front offices. The specifics differ from team to team, but the end result is the same: The days of the 250-inning starting pitcher, or the batter who plays all 162 games, “are gone,” said Dr. David Altchek, an orthopedic specialist with the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.“There’s not going to be a sudden reversion,” Altchek said. “We have our highest-paid players not playing. It’s ridiculous.” Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Welcome to MLB’s era of “load management.” The hottest buzz phrase in the NBA has been part of baseball’s fabric forever, if not its lexicon. Take the five-man starting rotation. This built-in system of rest has been the norm for generations of pitchers. Ask Danny Ozark about Steve Carlton’s “load management,” however, and he might assume you said stevedore by mistake.The change has really taken hold among position players – and not just back-of-the bench substitutes. Some degree of load management has become the norm, even among stars. In the last 11 seasons, four position players won a Most Valuable Player award while playing fewer than 140 games. That equals the number of sub-140-game MVPs from 1964 to 2008, excluding strike-shortened seasons.“Load management is probably another term for recovery,” Altchek said. “Just like any athletic endeavor, or your own training, if you go too hard too often, you start to go backwards instead of forwards. Baseball season is very long and very repetitive. It’s a challenge because you have to let these athletes recover. Nobody has a scientific measure of how much recovery they need, or don’t need. We tend to base it individually on past history.”Altchek went on to make an important distinction. Teams are collecting plenty of biomechanical data on their players these days. The proliferation of wearable tech has provided reams of information about the forces baseball players exert swinging a bat and throwing a ball. This is more true for minor leaguers than major leaguers, whose union prohibits teams from collecting certain data without the player’s permission.The question guiding baseball’s load management movement is what to do with all that data. Nestled in Altchek’s quote is a rather damning conclusion: teams are still relatively clueless.“Everyone’s more in a measurement phase than an execution phase,” he said. “Nobody really knows yet. We’re more in a data-collection phase, the first inning of this sport science phenomenon.”Related Articlescenter_img Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies In 1998, a record 96 pitchers qualified for an earned-run average title. Major League Baseball had just expanded to 30 teams. There were more players, and more pitchers, than ever. In the years that followed, the number of ERA qualifiers – pitchers who threw at least 162 innings in a season – hovered in the eighties and nineties.Then after the 2014 season, a funny thing happened. Qualifying for an ERA title became somewhat rare. Only 78 pitchers qualified in 2015, then 74, then 58. By 2018, MLB had only 57 qualifiers or fewer than any individual season from 1901 to 1944 (when there were only 16 teams!).This coincided with a similar trend among position players. To qualify for a batting title, a hitter must make 3.1 plate appearances per team game. The trend line since 1998 isn’t as steep or as steady. Still, from 2018 to 2019, the number of batting-title qualifiers fell from 141 to 135 – the lowest number since 1992, the final season of the 26-team era.On a fundamental level, this forces us to think differently about what to expect when we watch a baseball game. It’s long been true that a starting pitcher isn’t expected to complete all nine innings, save for rare occasions. Now it’s also true that only two pitchers per team on average will throw 162 innings in a season. The Angels, in an extreme example, saw only one pitcher (Trevor Cahill) throw even 100 innings in 2019. For many clubs, the idea of using a consistent third, fourth and fifth starter over a full season is a chimera. How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Angels fail to take series in Oakland, lose in 10 innings last_img read more

Read More »

Over 70 Beers to Taste Test at Seaside’s Pouring at the…

first_imgFacebook10Tweet0Pin0There may be no better way to spend St. Patrick’s Day in the Pacific Northwest than heading to Seaside, Oregon for the 9th Annual Pouring at the Coast brew fest. Held at the Seaside Civic and Convention Center, it’s the only place where you can sample beer and wine from over 30 breweries.Spend St. Patrick’s Day among friends, good beer and good wine at the 9th Annual Pouring at the Coast in Seaside, Oregon. Photo courtesy: Seaside ChamberIt’s no secret that Oregon and Washington are becoming known for our excellent local beers and this festival will have something for everyone – whether your taste is for traditional beers or craft beers created by microbreweries – with over 70 beers to choose from, there is sure to be one you like.The Start of Something SpecialPouring at the Coast began in 2009, when past Seaside Chamber of Commerce Director Al Smiley shared his love of beer with local Seaside brewery owner Jimmy Griffin. Through a series of discussions, the idea to create an event was discussed and the breweries dinner was born.These dinners attracted more than 60 guests each night and centered on pairing the beers with specific dishes. But soon more ideas surfaced and the Pouring at the Coast was on the horizon. With the growing popularity of craft beers, it seemed like a winning idea that paired perfectly with Seaside’s beautiful setting, just like Guinness and oysters.Organized jointly by the Seaside Chamber and Jimmy Griffin, the Pouring at the Coast has grown into a major yearly event hosting between 700-900 people each year. “It is a perfect fit for Seaside at this time of year,” says Chamber employee Sandi McDowall.Schedule of Events for the Pouring at the CoastThe Pouring at the Coast begins on Saturday, March 17 at 3:00 p.m. and runs to 8:00 p.m. While you partake in the beer tasting and wine tasting, the Pouring is the perfect atmosphere to hang out with friends. Live music from two bands will complete the party feel and definitely add to the ambience as you sip your stout or admire the glow of a pale ale.Choose from over 70 beers to taste test and then vote for your favorite during the People’s Choice Competition. Photo courtesy: Seaside ChamberOne of the highlights of the day is the Craft Beer Festival and People’s Choice Competition. This is where you get to sample some beer and vote on your festival favorites!Admission is just $20 and includes a souvenir tasting glass and five tasting tickets. A special pre-order admission for $25 that includes a souvenir pilsner glass and seven tasting tickets is only available in a limited number and only if you purchase your admission online.Seaside is a great place to get away, enjoy the beautiful beaches, great shopping and experience this year’s Pouring at the Coast. With so much to do, it’s a great place to spend a night or two for the perfect weekend getaway. There are many wonderful places to stay in Seaside, including Starry Night Inn, a newly renovated 1919 Victorian home that has been transformed into a magical bed & breakfast, and the iconic The Tides by the Sea, where the first thing you will see when you wake up each morning is the breaking waves in one for their oceanfront rooms. For something fun, be sure to check out suite 157, known as the “Titanic Room” or suite 147, the romantic “Emerald Suite.”To purchase tickets, visit the Pouring at the Coast website.last_img read more

Read More »