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Holiday homes and battlefields: Legacies of the Korean War along DMZ

first_imgPointing to a faint North Korean mountain top in the distance, Lee, who was born and grew up in Haean, said his hometown was also used for propaganda: a 1970s government housing project combined every two homes into one to make them look larger — all of them facing north.Cheorwon county, 60 kilometers north of the 38th parallel, also changed hands after the 1950-53 conflict ended with an armistice.On a nearly empty road leading to a military checkpoint stands the concrete shell of a three-story building — once the regional headquarters for the North’s ruling Workers’ Party.”Where we are standing now used to be North Korea,” said tour guide Gim Yong-sun.Before the war, she said, the building was a site for questioning and torturing those accused of anti-communist activities.Now the tank treads left at the entrance by advancing South Korean and UN forces in October 1950 serve as a reminder of the brutality of a conflict that killed millions. From North Korean party headquarters to holiday homes to cemeteries, 70 years after the Korean War began its legacies line the Demilitarized Zone that marks where the fighting came to a standstill.A few kilometers from the DMZ’s eastern end, a small stone villa stands on a cliff overlooking the white sands of Hwajinpo Beach in Goseong, South Korea.It lay in the North’s territory before the outbreak of war, when it was the summer home of its founder Kim Il Sung, grandfather of current leader Kim Jong Un. Barbed wire fence Hundreds of North Korean troops who never made it home lie in a field outside Paju, the only cemetery in the South for enemy combatants.Many of the graves hold multiple remains, their simple granite markers saying only the number of they contain, and just a handful are named.At Panmunjom, the truce village in the DMZ with its emblematic blue huts, their successors on both sides come face-to-face.In recent years it has seen a series of summits bringing together the North’s Kim, the South’s President Moon Jae-in, and US President Donald Trump.But the armistice has never been replaced by a peace treaty, leaving the peninsula technically still at war, and inter-Korean relations are now in the deep freeze with nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington at a deadlock.At the western end of the DMZ, barbed wire fences surround the border island of Gyodong, less than five kilometers from North Korea.Barber Ji Gwang-sik was 13 when he fled Yonpek, his North Korean hometown, at the height of the conflict.It took “less than 30 minutes” for his family to travel across on a wooden boat, Ji told AFP, but for nearly 70 years he has been unable to return — even though he can still see Yonpek from Gyodong.Now 82, he still waits for the day he will be able to return.”Only those who had the same experience understand the pain,” he said. Next to the stony steps leading up to the villa — now a museum — is a reprint of a faded 1948 black-and-white photo showing five children, among them Kim Jong Un’s father and predecessor Kim Jong Il.Goseong county, along with a swathe of what is now South Korea’s Gangwon province, is north of the 38th parallel line of latitude where the US and Soviet Union divided the peninsula after Japan’s surrender ended the Second World War and its colonial rule over Korea.Surrounded by mountain ridges, the peaceful farming village of Haean was the site of some of the most fierce and bloody battles of the war, nicknamed the “Punchbowl” by a US war correspondent who said the area resembled a cocktail glass.”The South Korean and UN forces had to cross our village in order to advance northwards,” explained tour guide and villager Lee Byeong-deuk. Topics :last_img read more

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Aviva to compensate preference share investors with £14m payment

first_imgAviva is to make a one-off goodwill payment of £14m (€16m) to shareholders who lost money when the FTSE 100 insurer announced plans in March to cancel £450m worth of preference shares.Investors who held the shares saw the value of their holdings drop in the wake of the announcement – which the insurer subsequently moved to cancel following what Aviva described as “strong feedback and criticism”.This morning the company – which owns the £352bn asset manager Aviva Investors – said it would offer a “discretionary goodwill payment” for those who had sold their shares at a loss between 8 March and 22 March inclusively.“This goodwill payment is intended to put those shareholders in the same financial position they would have been in had they sold their preference shares following the 23 March announcement, rather than the first announcement,” the company said in a statement. An estimated 2,000 individual investors sold their preference shares between 8 March and 22 March.Mark Wilson, group chief executive officer of Aviva, said the aim of the payment was to “do the right thing”.He added: “We accept that whatever action we take, we will continue to hear divergent views on this topic from various stakeholders.  However, together with our previous announcement not to proceed with the cancellation of the preference shares, we hope this goodwill payment goes some way to restoring trust in Aviva.”The insurer currently faces a review of its actions by the UK regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) – although chief executive Andrew Bailey has emphasised that it was not yet conducting a formal investigation.However, the FCA has written to companies that have issued preference shares in an attempt to foster greater awareness among investors of any factors that might affect the value of their investments.Companies issuing preference shares should ensure their investors were in possession of all the facts, Bailey wrote in the letter, including access to terms and conditions and being kept abreast of any changes.last_img read more

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Fears over potential sex tourism in the Pacific

first_imgAustralian Network News 25 Sept 2013An international organisation protecting children from sexual exploitation says the Pacific could soon become a major hub for sex trafficking and sex tourism if governments fail to take preventative action.The New Zealand arm of the child rights network ECPAT International warns the Pacific’s booming tourism industry could potentially lead to the rise in sex tourism.EPCAT’s national director Alan Bell has told Radio Australia’s Pacific Beat more attention needs to be paid to the potential risks involved and corrective measures need to be taken.“It’s much better to address these issues with prevention rather than deal with the results,” he said.“In any country, not just in the Pacific, where there is tourism, there is often sex tourism associated with it…with tourism increasing across the Pacific, I think the time is right for the Pacific to be looking at this.http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-25/fears-over-potential-for-sex-trafficking-pacific/4979606last_img read more

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Referee clinic part of a strategic plan to develop the sport of basketball in Dominica.

first_imgCoach Edwin Pena Ramos seated on the left and President of DABA, Dave Baron beside him.President of the Dominica Amateur Basketball Association, Dave Baron says the association is working on staging a Referee Clinic as part of its strategic plan to develop the sport of basketball on the island.“We at the Association, we did a very extensive strategic plan last year and one of our strategic plans was the coaching clinic and we’ve seen that through. We can expect another one of the other projects that we working on, a referee clinic. I know that with the Coaching Clinic there must be a Referee Clinic to improve the sport of basketball.”Mr. Baron who was addressing the closing ceremony of the one week Coaching Clinic facilitated by Coach Edwin Pena Ramos of International Federation (FIBA) said although the Referee Clinic might not last an entire week as the Coaching Clinic did, it will be an extensive program for the referees and table officials.“It probably might not be an entire week but at least we’ll have an extensive programme we can improve on our officiators. The Referee Clinic will encompass not just the referees themselves but the table officials will form an integral part of the basketball development.”According to Mr. Baron the recently concluded Coaching Clinic is a stepping stone in realizing the organization of a mini basketball programme.“We’re also looking at starting our mini basketball program and I think that what we did here this week is a stepping stone towards realizing that mini basketball program because in order that we teach the young ones the proper way to play basketball we have to ensure that our coaches are properly trained in that respect. We spent the entire week working on different ways we can develop the sport, different ways we can develop the players, the younger ones and so on, so we can look towards getting our mini basketball program off the ground from there on.”Dominica Vibes News Tweet NewsSports Referee clinic part of a strategic plan to develop the sport of basketball in Dominica. by: – August 5, 2011 Share 34 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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Police Blotter 01-25-2020

first_imgFailed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infolast_img read more

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Missouri St. looks to sweep Valpo

first_imgSUPER SENIORS: Valparaiso’s Javon Freeman-Liberty, Donovan Clay and Ryan Fazekas have combined to account for 45 percent of the team’s scoring this season and have scored 55 percent of all Crusaders points over the last five games.FACILITATING THE OFFENSE: Freeman-Liberty has been directly responsible for 45 percent of all Valparaiso field goals over the last three games. Freeman-Liberty has 23 field goals and 13 assists in those games.SLIPPING AT 71: Missouri State is 0-10 when it allows at least 71 points and 14-5 when it holds opponents to less than 71.WINNING WHEN: Valparaiso is a perfect 5-0 when it holds an opponent to 62 points or fewer. The Crusaders are 10-14 when opponents score more than 62 points.DID YOU KNOW: Valparaiso is ranked second among MVC teams with an average of 72.3 points per game. The Crusaders have averaged 76.7 points per game over their last three games. Missouri St. looks to sweep Valpo February 24, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditMissouri State (14-15, 8-8) vs. Valparaiso (15-14, 8-8)Athletics-Recreation Center, Valparaiso, Indiana; Tuesday, 8 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Valparaiso seeks revenge on Missouri State after dropping the first matchup in Springfield. The teams last faced each other on Jan. 23, when the Bears shot 36.8 percent from the field while limiting Valparaiso’s shooters to just 31.8 percent en route to a 67-60 victory.center_img ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com,The Latest: Justin Thomas takes early lead at US Open Associated Press last_img read more

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Fundamentals key to Warriors’ success in Commonwealth Cricket League

first_imgTHE WEST Coast Warriors Cricket Club are sticking with the fundamentals, which have propelled them to a dominant start in the Commonwealth Cricket League currently underway in New York.The Guyanese side sit comfortably on top of the 24-team points table with 12 points (six wins from six games). Tomorrow they will play the Pacban Cricket Club (a team made up of players from Pakistan and Bangladesh).Pacban have won two of their three games so far.Player/coach of the Warriors, Yutesh Avi Dhanpaul, who has been instrumental with bat and ball in several of the victories, said that the players have stayed humble in their executions during the early games.“Our players just stick to the basic and they adapted really fast to these type of wickets.  The wicket here is more bouncy and it plays faster.”In their most recent victory, last Sunday against Spring Valley CC, the Warriors (made up of both local and overseas-based Guyanese) romped to a nine-wicket win.Balbinder Shivpersaud, exploded again. The Zeeburg Sports Club cricketer has been in dominant form, having scored four consecutive half-centuries. It was, however, skipper Rajin Rahaman with his medium pace bowling, who won the man-of-the-match award.Spring Valley won the toss, but could only muster 133-7 from their 30 overs as Rahaman nabbed 4-20 from six overs. Anil Sookdeo supported with 2-21. Jay Masspeht led the batting side with 52.In reply, Shivpersaud blasted another quick-fire half-century. His unbeaten 58 propelled the Warriors to victory in 18.3 overs. R. Khan supported with 33, while Dhanpaul added 29 unbeaten runs.last_img read more

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Meet MTSU: The story behind each of the Blue Raiders’ 6 contributing transfers

first_imgDarnell Harris, Sr., Forward, 11.7 points per game, 4 rebounds per gameHarris made four stops before he finally got to Middle Tennessee State. He played at two prep schools to improve his grades. He went to Wisconsin-Whitewater, a D-III school because the coach did him a favor. Then he went to Northwest Florida before finally getting Division I looks.“I didn’t have good grades coming out of high school,” Harris said. “I wasn’t eligible to play Division I right away. So I went to prep school and tried to get my grades up. Things didn’t work out there. So I had to go D-III.”His grade school coach was an assistant at Whitewater. He was a “mentor” to Harris. His choices were to either go the JUCO route and continue a Division I dream, or play D-III. He chose the latter, but after a year, the UWW coaching staff pushed him to try and play at the JUCO level. A year later, Harris was visiting Kent State and MTSU. On the fourth try, he’d made it.He scored 15 points in the win over Michigan State, playing just 28 minutes. He was on the court, arms raised high in the air when the final buzzer sounded.“Just getting here, it makes it all worth it,” Harris said. “It makes the journey worth it. I went on that journey for a reason. And to see it all pay off is a dream come true.”Jaqawn Raymond, Sr., Guard, 5.2 points per game, 2.1 rebounds per gameRaymond is the only MTSU player to ever compete against someone on Syracuse. And “compete” is a relative term. On Feb. 16, 2012, Raymond’s North Carolina State team faced off against Michael Gbinije’s Duke squad. Raymond didn’t enter the game. Gbinije played one minute.Not really getting an opportunity is the reason why Raymond left the Wolfpack. He was recruited by Sidney Lowe, the former head coach who resigned before Raymond arrived on campus. Current head coach Mark Gottfried honored the commitment, but Raymond didn’t feel like he would fit in after sticking it out for a year.Monte Towe was an assistant at N.C. State when Raymond was being recruited. And when Towe went to MTSU, it helped ease the recruiting process and make the choice of where to go easier.“I didn’t play as much as I wanted to,” Raymond said. “So I talked to my coaches and my teammates and they said the best thing for me personally is just transferring and go somewhere that will fit me.”As soon as head coach Kermit Davis called, Raymond visited three days later and signed within a week.And on Saturday, Raymond had the highlight reel play of the day, going up and under on a layup and falling to the ground and extending MTSU’s late lead to six. It’s not Tobacco Road. It’s not the ACC. But he’s still playing basketball.“This experience has been one of the top moments in my life,” Raymond said. “And I wouldn’t change it for the world.”MORE COVERAGE:Meet MTSU: Giddy Potts and the making of the nation’s best 3-point shooterGallery: Players preview the Syracuse-Middle Tennessee State matchupWhat Syracuse players and coaches had to say about facing MTSU Related Stories Meet MTSU: Giddy Potts and the making of the nation’s best 3-point shooterWhat Syracuse basketball players and coaches had to say about facing Middle Tennessee StateGallery: Players preview Syracuse-MTSU matchup during Saturday media opportunitySyracuse basketball opponent preview: Visual breakdown of Middle Tennessee StateNCAA Tournament notebook: You never know what’s coming next A media member looks at the MTSU roster on Saturday. Margaret Lin | Senior Staff Photographer Published on March 19, 2016 at 8:04 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Aldonis Foote, Jr., Forward, 2.8 points per game, 2.0 rebounds per gameFoote was crying on the way home from Missouri State. He was crushed after one of the most painful moments he can remember.He was supposed to go to school and play for the Bears. A transfer success story from Trinity Valley Community College. But when he was at MSU, the coach told him that not all of his grades came in on time and that they couldn’t honor the commitment.It was on his way back that he got a call from Davis. He said he could be a guy that would help him in all aspects of life, on and off the court.“Coming out of high school, I definitely wanted to go D-I. But in high school, as a kid, you’re so caught up in the publicity and being one of the best players on the team,” Foote said. “And being one of the best players around the state (Illinois). There wasn’t too much focus on school.At community college, Foote had to “start over.” The type of road that no one wants to take, he said. But when he got that call from Davis, it validated everything he went through in going to Trinity Valley the year before and even the difficult experience he had just hours before.“It all worked out,” Foote said. “Honestly, I believe anywhere I went it would have worked out. I love the game.” ST. LOUIS —Middle Tennessee State is home to eight transfers. Six of them play this year — two are redshirting — and average of combined 29.7 points per game. Two of them transferred from Division I schools, six from junior college. Three played at multiple colleges. One had two years of prep school. Some had grade problems. Some had ego problems. Some didn’t play enough at other schools or just weren’t happy.They all have a story of how they ended up at the nation’s newest Cinderella school. They all have a long, sometimes difficult journey, that seemed to be validated with one of the greatest upsets in college basketball history. Now, they’re all set to face No. 10 seed Syracuse (20-13, 9-9 Atlantic Coast) at 6:10 on Sunday at the Scottrade Center.Here is the story behind each of the No. 15 seed Blue Raiders (29-5, 13-5 Conference USA) six contributing transfers.Perrin Buford, Sr., Guard, 12.1 points per game, 5.9 rebounds per gameBuford had a personality problem coming out of high school in Decatur, Alabama.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I just had the know-it-all attitude,” Buford said. “You couldn’t tell me nothing.”Going to JUCO changed him. He realized he wasn’t as good as he’d propped himself up to be. He realized he needed to work.The first stop was Motlow State Community College in Tennessee. Then when his coach Jerry Nichols left to coach at Southwest Tennessee Community College, Buford went there with him. Buford said he always knew that he was a Division I talent, but at the time, college coaches disagreed.He used to get attention back home as being one of the best players. But it all died down when he didn’t make it to the D-I level. He said that people didn’t understand what JUCO was and wrote him off. They didn’t understand the work he had to put in just to get noticed by D-I coaches.Buford said Nichols was the first coach that believed in him. And that spurred his personal development. And when it came time to pick a D-I school, he knew MTSU because he had a second cousin that played there. Motlow was located just a couple minutes away. It was always so close to him, and now it’s where he’s living out his greatest achievement.“You have to enjoy the process,” Buford said. “That’s why success is so magnified. Because you know what you do when no one is looking. And then when everyone is looking it’s a shock to them. But you’re like, ‘I’ve been waiting for this moment my whole life.’” Xavier Habersham, Jr., Forward, 3.2 points per game, 1.6 rebounds per gameHabersham had run out of options when he went to Hill College after dropping out of junior college for failing a required math class.He reached out to a coach who talked to Swede Trenkle, the head coach at Hill.“That was like my last option for the summer,” Habersham said. “I had no other schools that wanted me. He basically took a risk on me.”Trenkle had played with Davis in college. And Trenkle vouched for Habersham when the recruiting process started. He had another offer from Stephen F. Austin, but liked the lure of Conference USA over the Southland. He went from a guy without options to being wanted within a year.“It is crazy. I never would never have thought I’d make it this far,” Habersham said. “With me coming to Middle Tennessee, I knew that we could make a good run. I never thought we’d come this far.”Quavius Copeland, So., Guard, 4.7 points per game, 0.9 rebounds per gameCopeland isn’t the first person in his family to decide to transfer to MTSU and play basketball there. His brother LaRon Dendy, currently playing overseas with Provence Basket, played one season at MTSU in 2011. He was the leading scorer and Sun Belt Conference Player of the Year.“I knew it was a good program from his perspective,” Copeland said. “I knew Coach Davis. I just wanted to come here and play the best role I could.”Copeland said he visited six different schools after he decided to transfer from Gulf Coast Community College. He considered playing at Cal, but still decided to go to Murfreesboro and play for the Blue Raiders. Dendy didn’t push him to come, but he certainly vouched for his experience.On Friday, after a Bryn Forbes 3 cut the MTSU lead to three early in the second half, Copeland raced the ball up the court before MSU could get back on defense. He scored a bucket and got fouled, allowing his team to punch back once again after the Spartans made it close.“We all come in, and Coach Davis gets us to fit well,” Copeland said. “And that’s just how we roll.” Comments Aldonis Foote takes a photo of a teammate getting interviewed. Margaret Lin | Senior Staff Photographer Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Kearns expecting tough battle from Waterford

first_imgThe Premier County face the Déise in the Munster Championship Quarter-Final on Sunday.Tipp won with plenty to spare when the counties met at the same stage of the competition last year.Liam Kearns says he’s is expecting it to be a lot closer this weekend Sunday’s match throws in at 3.30 on Sunday at Fraher Field, Dungarvan….Tipp FM will have full live coverage of the game, in association with Centralast_img

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