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Poll: Americans Favor a Carbon Tax That Goes to Clean-Energy Development

first_imgPoll: Americans Favor a Carbon Tax That Goes to Clean-Energy Development FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Phys.org:The majority of the U.S. public is in favor of a tax on fossil fuels, provided the money goes into clean energy and infrastructure, according to a new study.The Yale University study surveyed Americans’ willingness to pay a carbon tax, and their preferences on how any revenue should be spent. The results were published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters.The researchers carried out a nationally-representative survey of 1,226 American adults, aged 18 and over. The survey introduced the idea of a carbon tax to combat climate change, and then asked respondents how they would like to see the revenue used if such a tax were implemented. Respondents were given 10 different expenditure categories and asked to indicate whether they would support or oppose each one.Professor Kotchen said: “We found the greatest level of support – nearly 80 per cent – was for the revenue to be used in the development of clean energy, and for improvements to US infrastructure like roads and bridges.“With the average American household willing to pay a mean amount of around $177 a year in carbon tax on their energy bills, this equates to around $22 billion that could be spent on investments in clean energy and infrastructure, among other sectors as well.“Interestingly, our analysis indicates strong public support – more than 70 per cent – for using some portion of the carbon-tax revenue to compensate coal miners whose jobs may be affected by a reduction in the use of fossil fuels. By our calculations – based on the number of workers carrying out coal extraction – there would be enough revenue from this tax to compensate all coal miners with nearly US$146,000 upon passage of the tax.”The research found that the ‘willingness to pay’ of Americans was actually less than the proposed carbon tax price described in the influential “The Conservative Case for Carbon Dividends” report from the Climate Leadership Council’s report in Feb 2017.More: US public backs carbon tax, and spending revenue on renewableslast_img read more

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Colstrip bailout bill fails in Montana legislature

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($): “It’s fantastic news that this bill didn’t pass, as now Montanans won’t be forced to hand over millions of dollars to NorthWestern Energy without any recourse,” Mike Scott, senior organizing representative for the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, said in a statement. “Now it’s time to get serious about diversifying our economy and replacing expensive coal power with clean energy.” The failure of the bill, one of the most controversial pieces of legislation in this year’s legislative session, could seal the fate of the troubled coal plant as states in the region attempt to move away from coal-fired generation. NorthWestern Energy is formulating its resource procurement plan, which Scott called “the process that should be used to decide what’s best for the customers.” Units 1 and 2 of the plant are scheduled to close in 2022. NorthWestern, which operates as NorthWestern Energy, owns 222 MW of Colstrip Unit 4. The company would not disclose the prospective seller of the additional capacity, but Richmond said in pushing the legislation that owners would be willing to sell it to NorthWestern for $1. Colstrip bailout bill fails in Montana legislature The bill, proposed by Republican Sen. Tom Richmond, died in the House on a 60-37 vote April 16, and lawmakers failed to revive it before the session ended April 26. Montana lawmakers failed to pass legislation that would have enabled NorthWestern Corp. to pass on $75 million in costs associated with acquiring an additional 150-MW share in the beleaguered Colstrip power plant without oversight from the state Public Service Commission. More ($): Colstrip bailout bill dies in Montana, raising questions about plant’s futurelast_img read more

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Fossil fuels ‘obvious losers’ in the energy transition

first_imgFossil fuels ‘obvious losers’ in the energy transition FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Forbes:The super-rich will dedicate some $50 trillion to sustainable investments in coming years and blue chip Wall Street firms like Goldman Sachs GS and Carlyle Group are lining up to meet the demand. Utilities nationwide are pouring billions into solar and wind projects, in part to comply with their own creditors’ environmental demands. Corporations worldwide are cutting their carbon footprints and, in the background, bold-faced investors such as Norway’s $1 trillion pension fund and $7 trillion in assets BlackRock BLK are putting the screws on carbon-emitters. These are exciting times for the green movement.Boston-based hedge fund manager James Jampel, of $460 million in assets HITE Hedge Asset Management, has a simple way to play the green arms race. He’s betting against the entire carbon industry, which he believes is in chronic decline much like whip-and-buggy-makers at the dawn of the auto age, or Sears amid the rise of Amazon AMZN, and Eastman Kodak KODK when the electronic camera went mainstream. Basically, the writing’s on the wall for oilmen.When the OPEC’s price cartel was obliterated once more—this time by a March spat between Saudi Arabia and Russia at the absolute worst time—and oil fell to generational lows of $20 a barrel, HITE made a killing. Jampel’s $95 million HITE Carbon Offset Fund has gained 32% year-to-date, according to a source, while the S&P 500 index has fallen by about a quarter.“[L]et’s have the experts choose winners in the new green economy,” says Jampel, “It’s so much easier to bet against the obvious losers.”[Antoine Gara]More: A Different Kind Of Green Investing: Meet The Carbon Skeptic Hedge Fund That’s Up 32% In 2020last_img read more

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Tokyo Electric to invest $18 billion in renewable energy over the next 10 years

first_imgTokyo Electric to invest $18 billion in renewable energy over the next 10 years FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:The renewable power unit of the nation’s biggest utility plans to spend more than ¥2 trillion ($18 billion) over the next 10 years to boost its green power generation by as much as 70 percent.The push by Tokyo Electric Power Co. Holdings Inc. (Tepco) comes as institutions in Japan are under increasing pressure to curb support for coal, both at home and abroad, and as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government seeks to bolster the role of clean power.The unit, Tepco Renewable Power, plans to help fund its new ventures through a green bond offering that may exceed ¥10 billion and is likely to come before March, according to President Seiichi Fubasami.Offshore wind and hydro generation are the unit’s primary focuses as it seeks to develop 7 gigawatts of green power capacity within the country and overseas in partnership with other companies.“To cope with climate change, we are moving toward a carbon-free society,” he said in an interview Wednesday. “Our target is to make renewable energy a main source of power.”Tepco Renewable Power currently has 170 renewable facilities with a total capacity of 9.96 gigawatts. Of the total, 9.91 gigawatts are from 165 hydropower plants, 30 megawatts are from three solar farms, and 21 megawatts come from two wind plants.[Aya Takada]More: Tepco plans ¥2 trillion green power push by 2030last_img read more

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Wintergreen Lift Passes Week 5

first_imgWeek 4 is now over, which means here is week 5! For the next 4 weeks we will be giving away lift passes to Wintergreen Resort!Each week we will give away 2 weekday lift passes (valid Monday-Thursday) to one lucky individual, so 16 in total over 8 weeks.To sweeten the deal, we are also giving away a ColdAvenger Classic Fleece face mask (a $50 value) with the tickets!This contest is now over, but Week 6 is up and running!Rules and Regulations: Package must be redeemed within 1 year of winning  date. Entries must be received by mail or through the www.blueridgeoutdoors.com contest sign-up page by 12:00 noon EST on February 8th, 2013. One entry per person. One winner per household.  Sweepstakes open only to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United  States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older.  Void wherever prohibited by law. Families and employees of Blue Ridge  Outdoors Magazine and participating sponsors are not eligible. No  liability is assumed for lost, late, incomplete, inaccurate,  non-delivered or misdirected mail, or misdirected e-mail, garbled,  mistranscribed, faulty or incomplete telephone transmissions, for  technical hardware or software failures of any kind, lost or unavailable  network connection, or failed, incomplete or delayed computer  transmission or any human error which may occur in the receipt of  processing of the entries in this Sweepstakes. By entering the  sweepstakes, entrants agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and Wintergreen Resort reserve  the right to contact entrants multiple times with special information  and offers. Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine reserves the right, at their  sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who tampers with the entry  process and to cancel, terminate, modify or suspend the Sweepstakes.  Winners agree that Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine and participating  sponsors, their subsidiaries, affiliates, agents and promotion agencies  shall not be liable for injuries or losses of any kind resulting from  acceptance of or use of prizes. No substitutions or redemption of cash,  or transfer of prize permitted. Any taxes associated with winning any of  the prizes detailed below will be paid by the winner. Winners agree to  allow sponsors to use their name and pictures for purposes of promotion.  Sponsors reserve the right to substitute a prize of equal or greater  value. All Federal, State and local laws and regulations apply.  Selection of winner will be chosen at random at the Blue Ridge Outdoors  office on or before March 1st, 6:00 PM EST 2013. Winners will be contacted by  the information they provided in the contest sign-up field and have 7  days to claim their prize before another winner will be picked. Odds of  winning will be determined by the total number of eligible entries received.last_img read more

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Fat Girl Running: Mirna Valerio is Out With a New Book

first_img“Tikki Tikki Tembo” recounts a folktale in which a boy falls into a well and is rescued by an old man with a ladder who “step over step, step over step” goes into the well, retrieves the boy, and then “step over step, step over step” carries him back out.It turns out that “step over step, step over step” also makes a great mantra for distance runners, according to trailblazing ultramarathoner Mirna Valerio.“It gets me through a lot,” Valerio says. “I don’t necessarily think of that folktale when I’m saying it, but it helps. One foot in front of the other. Step over step.”The mantra accounts for Valerio’s relentless pace on runs and in life. She’s not the fastest, as she’s the first to admit, but the refusal to give up has powered her rise as an athlete, a social media phenomenon, and as of this fall, the author of a much-anticipated memoir.Valerio is a teacher at north Georgia high school. A decade ago, a medical scare inspired her to start running. She signed up for a bunch of races, and in 2012, she ran her first trail marathon. Since then, she’s gone on to run in a series of increasingly longer races, documenting her experiences as “an active larger girl in a thinner world” on her blog, Fat Girl Running.Media outlets started paying attention, and over the last few years Valerio’s profile has grown to the point that, although she shrugs off that term, she’s become something of a trail-running celebrity.“Things have been kind of crazy, in a really really good way,” Valerio says. “My son is over it, though. He’s 14 years old. I’m like, hey, CNN’s going to be here, and he’s like, ‘Yeah, that’s cool.”These days, she’s training for August’s TransRockies Run, a 6-day trek that covers 120 miles and 20,000 feet of climbing between Buena Vista and Beaver Creek, Colorado.She’s picked up a few sponsors, including Skirtsports, Swiftwick, and Merrell. As a brand ambassador for Merrell, she has also participated in a string of Tough Mudder events in which she charged through 10 miles of obstacles, including crawling through live electric wires.Getting shocked three times in one race “makes you realize how awesome electricity is and makes you wonder how it has the capacity to blow a 245 pound human being over like a dried-out, dead flower,” Valerio wrote on her blog about the experience.Valerio’s appeal—to both sponsors and the more than 12,000 people who follow her on Instagram and other social media—is not surprising: she has refused to let stereotypes about her race or body shape dissuade her from getting out and taking to the trails, and her unwaveringly positive attitude encourages the idea that, hey, anyone can do this with the right frame of mind.“This is really an extension of what I do as a teacher, which is demonstrating and being a role model,” Valerio says. “I talk about diversity, about implicit bias and sexism and racism. All of that is implicit in what I do in my public life.”Although her story speaks to anyone who’s ever felt discouraged from running (every runner ever, really), it also speaks to a more specific group—African Americans who have felt uncomfortable and even fearful entering the woods, especially in a former state of the Confederacy like Georgia, where Valerio lives.“Historically, African Americans weren’t always welcomed, and in some respects still aren’t welcomed, in hiking and backpacking,” Valerio says. “When I see someone on the trail who’s black or Latino, I’m like, ‘Hey! How are you? Good to see you!’ We both know what I mean by that ‘good to see you,’ because there’s not enough other people.“It’s still not as welcoming a place as others—not just the woods in themselves, but the whole outdoor culture is not necessarily welcoming. I also get comments from black people: ‘Well, you know we don’t run in the woods. Because the last time we ran in the woods, we got hung.’ Stuff like that, from close friends! That is so collectively in the memory of African Americans. That’s sad and hurtful that people are carrying this baggage with them.”Organizations like Outdoor Afro actively work to change that conversation and experience, and Valerio has made it a part of her mission too. And while she didn’t consciously consider the rich heritage of African American memoirs as she wrote her own, it nonetheless informed the process. It’s not a coincidence, for example, that Valerio signed with Dystel & Goderich Literary Management—the New York City firm that represented Barack Obama on his first book.Valerio’s memoir, A Beautiful Work in Progress, is set to be published by Grand Harbor Press on October 1. With it, she hopes to take her message to an entirely new audience.“I wanted to frame my own narrative,” Valerio says. “My goal in writing it is to show rather than tell people that somebody in my body can do something like this. I wanted to show people that if you want to run in whatever body you have, you can do it. It might be slow, it might be painful, but you can do it. And you are entitled to exercise out in public as you are.”last_img read more

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Comfort Zone

first_imgI need to get out more.There are days when I will refuse to cross the river into the west side of town because it’s just too damn far. There are days when I won’t even leave the neighborhood, content with hitting the singletrack that’s a mile from my house and walking to the corner store for sustenance. I’m like one of those old people who stays in their slippers all day and watches Fox News on a constant loop. Just festering in my own xenophobic anger.The Southern Appalachians are full of wonderful destinations ripe with adventure and intrigue. There are hidden lakes and rock outcropping a and waterfalls and solitary single track…so many gems out there in the wild, but I won’t go to them because they’re just so damn far away. If I could snap my fingers and be at the trailhead instantaneously, I’d explore the entire region, but I just can’t fathom sitting in a car for two hours just to take a hike or paddle a river. I’d like to think that my lack of willingness to explore is because I have to travel so much for work, but to be honest I’m just lazy and am content with existing well within my comfort zone. So, there are many places in the southern Appalachians that I have yet to explore.But I sucked it up recently and drove two very long, winding hours into the Great Smoky Mountains to explore a remote corner of the park that I’d somehow managed to avoid for the last 15 years. I had a free day and I’ve always been curious about Shuckstack Tower, a retired lookout tower that overlooks the southeastern corner of Fontana Lake. I didn’t see another soul at the trailhead or along the trail because most people are like me and are reluctant to get outside of their comfort zones. Also, it was a weekday and jobs.It’s a hump of a hike along the Appalachian Trail—basically 3.5 miles up on beautiful bench cut singletrack that contours around the side of Shuckstack Ridge. It was 90 degrees and I soaked through my clothes within the first mile. But I was rewarded with a fire tower that is in good enough shape to climb and a view of Fontana and Nantahala National Forest that I’d never seen before.I’d like to say that my mini weekday adventure sparked a newfound wanderlust, but to be honest, I booked it back down the trail and drove straight home to the comforts of my neighborhood. Tomorrow, I’ll probably just ride the neighborhood singletrack. It’s not easy to expand your comfort zone. Baby steps.last_img read more

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Blue Ridge Marathon Celebrates 10 Years of More than Just Running

first_imgShowcase a Region: The race course shows that there is something special about the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains and lifestyle of the Roanoke Region. The course features three separate mountain-top vistas, historic homes, an eclectic downtown, and finishes in the open-air amphitheater at Elmwood Park. The race has drawn attention from national media including The Weather Channel, ESPN, USA Today, Conde Nast Traveler, Delta Sky Magazine, and Runner’s World.Engage a Healthy, Active Community: The community is involved in every aspect of the race. More than 600 volunteers work to pull off this monster event and race options such as the Carilion Children’s Family 1 Miler and walking options, make America’s Toughest more accessible. There are also tailgating parties in the front yards of spectators along the course; many runners cite these homemade aid stations as what makes the race special. Give Back in a Big Way: The Blue Ridge Marathon, which is put on by the Roanoke Outside Foundation, is a 100 percent nonprofit race. Every dollar earned goes toward dozens of nonprofits throughout the region. To date, the Blue Ridge Marathon has donated $185,000 to community organizations. Benefiting charities run the gambit from groups with a mission to empower girls through running to sexual assault awareness organizations to the preservation of historic buildings to developing trail networks. Economic Impact: In addition to supporting nonprofits, the race has had a significant impact on the entire Roanoke Region. Since the inception of the Blue Ridge Marathon, the race has contributed $4.5 million to the regional economy. That’s money that comes into the region from travelers attending the event, hotel stays, eating at restaurants, shopping at local businesses, and visiting regional attractions. The activity supports new jobs (6.9 jobs in 2017) each year. The 10th anniversary of America’s Toughest Road Race is a milestone for charitable giving and regional economic impact.The Foot Levelers Blue Ridge Marathon is known as one of the toughest races in the world. (The Weather Channel and Runner’s World  have both noted its challenging mountain route and scenic beauty.)On April 13, Blue Ridge celebrates its 10th anniversary in Roanoke, Virginia.  Even if you aren’t a runner, this event makes room for you to participate in a weekend that’s more than “just a race.” In addition to race distances including a double marathon, marathon, half marathon, 10K, relay, and 1-mile fun run, Roanoke hosts a weekend-long music festival. Known as America’s Toughest Road Marathon, the race has earned kudos from runners from all over the country and leverages that to benefit the entire region in several ways: Whether you are from the Roanoke Region of Virginia or just visiting, being part of the Blue Ridge Marathon is something special. The race is known for a friendly atmosphere, great swag, and an amazing sense of accomplishment when you tackle these mountains. Let’s celebrate 10 years of making a difference in the world and being the healthiest versions of ourselves at America’s Toughest Road Races.last_img read more

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Outdoor Updates: Hiker missing for a week in Arkansas mountains is found alive

first_imgTourism to national parks in southern WV creates nearly $70 million in economic benefit The world premiere of the film takes place on June 20 at 7 pm at Blue Ridge Community College’s Thomas Auditorium. The film will also play June 22 at 7:30 pm at the NC Arboretum and June 23 at 7:30 pm at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $15 and reservations can be made online at www.saveculture.org. Film about people who have protected southern rivers to make world debut June 20 Hiker missing for a week in Arkansas mountains is found alive A man who went missing after embarking on a solo hike to celebrate his 38th birthday has been found alive. Josh McClatchy set out to hike Arkansas’ Buckeye Trail but soon texted his mother that he was lost. For the following six days, his friends and family worked alongside rescue agencies to search for McClatchy in a rugged and remote area of Arkansas. A rescue helicopter eventually spotted the hiker, who had wandered four miles off of the trail. It took rescuers 3.5 hours to carry McClatchy off of the mountain and back to the trailhead where he was transferred to a hospital and reunited with his family. The hiker was severely dehydrated but otherwise in good condition. His mother told ABC that it was her son’s first time hiking alone. center_img A newly released National Park Service report shows that more than 1.36 million visitors to the New River Gorge National River, Bluestone National Scenic River, and Gauley River National Recreation Area in southern West Virginia spent over $60 million in communities surrounding the three parks in 2018. The spending supported nearly 850 jobs and had a cumulative benefit to the local economy of almost $70 million. WNC’s History and Documentary Film Center, the Center for Cultural Preservation, will soon release a new film about the ordinary people who did extraordinary things to protect southern rivers and streams. The film, titled Guardians of Our Troubled Waters, is the center’s sixth feature film. The film chronicles early and remarkable river stewards who stood up against the destruction of rivers and wetlands in Western North Carolina, East Tennessee and South Florida and those who carry on the fight today. The report also shows that, throughout the country, 318 million park visitors spent over $20 billion in communities within 60 miles of national parks. The National Park Service reports that national park tourism is a significant economic driver, bringing in $10 for every $1 invested in the National Park Service.last_img read more

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U.S. presents Legion of Merit to Former MINUSTAH Commander

first_imgBy Dialogo September 02, 2010 U.S. Air Force Gen. Douglas Fraser, Commander of U.S. Southern Command, presented the United States Defense Department’s Legion of Merit medal to Brazilian Army Maj. Gen. Floriano Peixoto Vieira during a formal award ceremony Aug. 31 at Brazil’s Army headquarters in Brasilia. Fraser presented the medal on behalf of the President of the United States of America in recognition of Peixoto’s countless contributions and meritorious service in support of the international relief efforts that helped save lives and alleviate human suffering following the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti Jan. 12. The Legion of Merit was established by an act of Congress in 1942 and is one of the highest military decorations awarded by the United States to U.S. or foreign military personnel who distinguish themselves by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services. The citation accompanying the medal praises Peixoto’s “leadership, dedication and tireless efforts” as Force Commander of the United Nation’s Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH). “Major General Floriano Peixoto’s strategic assessment of potentially volatile situations and adept cooperation with the Haitian Military Police ensured a stable security situation for the international organizations working to deliver aid to the Haitian people,” the citation reads. His inspirational leadership following the tragic collapse of the UN Stabilization Mission headquarters is also credited in the citation with helping to ensure the stabilization mission continued despite the catastrophic effects suffered as a result of the disaster. Peixoto, and the UN forces he commanded, played a key role during one of the most historic international relief missions in modern history. One of the many organizations supported by MINUSTAH was Joint Task Force-Haiti, established by U.S. Southern Command after the quake to oversee U.S. military assistance to the historic relief effort. Peixoto and the commander of JTF-Haiti, Lt. Gen. Ken Keen, have a strong friendship dating back to their time together more than two decades ago at the Brazil Airborne Brigade and the Command and General Staff College in Rio de Janeiro. The pre-existing bond between the two commanders helped expedite the coordination efforts between JTF-Haiti and MINUSTAH. Because of MINUSTAH’s important contributions in providing security for the relief efforts, the task force was able to focus on supporting search and rescue, medical assistance, distribution of aid and logistical efforts in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. On May 26, Brazilian Deputy Consul General Roberto Parente and Peixoto recognized Keen with Brazil’s Order of Rio de Branco for his contributions to the internationally supported relief mission in Haiti during a formal ceremony at the headquarters of U.S. Southern Command in Miami.last_img read more

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