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Apuro plugs the gap

first_imgDistributor Apuro has introduced the low-cost Samsung semi-commercial microwave oven to “fill the gap between light-duty domestic models and more expensive, larger commercial microwaves”. The Samsung Superlite CM1039K has a power output of 1,000w and has a black metal outer cabinet and stainless steel inner cavity. Apuro says it is “designed to withstand the demand of a semi-commercial environment” and is suitable for small cafés, where microwaves are not the main source of cooking.The Superlite has large, manual-dial controls for power and timer settings and five power levels to offer versatility in cooking. It has three cooking levels from 500 to 1,000 watts, plus two defrost settings. The pull-open door has a large display window. No special wiring is necessary as it plugs straight in to a standard 13-amp socket.[http://www.apuro.co.uk]last_img read more

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Reporting in

first_imgJulian HuntDirector of communications, Food and Drink FederationThe theatre next to our offices in London’s Covent Garden is currently home to the hit stage show Oliver. Music lovers among you will remember the iconic moment in this show, when the eponymous star stands up in front of Mr Bumble and says “Please Sir, can I have some more?”I found this image popping into my mind the other day as I was mulling over some of the pressures being placed on bakers and others in industry to keep reformulating their products. The irony is that, in our working lives, the roles have been somewhat reversed: we are cast as Oliver and it’s Mr Bumble who is demanding, not asking, ever more from us.The industry does have a responsibility to rise to the challenges faced by society in tackling serious health issues, such as heart disease and obesity. And our sector’s world-class innovation skills have allowed us to develop new products for consumers and refresh old favourites so that they are lower in calories, fat or salt. But changing the recipes of much-loved brands needs to be done carefully, so as not to affect product quality. I would argue the UK industry is now leading the way on the reformulation of popular products meeting health concerns in a way that makes no compromise on taste.That said, policy-makers do need to appreciate that change on this scale requires a huge financial commitment and that there are limits as to how far bakers can keep pushing the technical barriers.Sadly, we are seeing few public signs of any such realism in policy-making. But then Mr Bumble always was a bit of a greedy bugger, wasn’t he?last_img read more

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RedBlack updates Cybake

first_imgYork-based RedBlack Software has developed a new version of its Cybake bakery management software.New functions of Cybake v3 include specifications management, allergen tracking, advanced invoice management, invoice matching, ad hoc sales queries, credit control, supplier relationship management and celebration cakes management.The software also features a revamped Microsoft SQL Server/.NET architecture for increased scaleability and improved business intelligence capabilities.The business has also launched a new ordering system, which interfaces with EPOS systems to let head office collect sales data directly from its bakery shops’ tills. Order-takers can now analyse shops’ orders as they come in, make recommendations and adjustments with their shop managers and tighten up on the ordering process.www.cybake.co.uklast_img read more

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Country Style Foods buys Ainsleys’ central bakery

first_imgBuyers have been found for the vast majority of Leeds-based Ainsleys, which went into administration in November, with Country Style Foods acquiring the company’s central bakery and brand.A deal has also been struck to sell 20 of Ainsleys’ 29 leasehold retail outlets, split evenly between craft bakery chains Cooplands of Scarborough and Cooplands of Doncaster. Ainsleys’ sandwich van business has been sold to AW Food Services. Joe McLean, a partner at administrator Grant Thornton, said: “We are really pleased to have found buyers for the majority of the various businesses within the Ainsleys portfolio. Negotiations are still ongoing in respect of the remaining nine stores and we hope to be able to announce a positive resolution shortly.”I would like to thank all Ainsleys staff for their help and support during this difficult time. Their loyalty and commitment to Ainsleys, shown by their high standard of work despite uncertainty and terrible weather conditions, has been vital in securing a buyer.”For the full story, see the February 12 issue of British Baker.last_img read more

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Reduction responsibility

first_imgFor those who do qualify, it’s important to remember that reductions in emissions from gas count equally when it comes to submitting the carbon return, which decides the level of rebate or penalty a firm faces under the scheme. By gaining a much deeper appreciation of the base load and volatility of their gas consumption, bakeries are better equipped to select the best contract. This minimises the risk of consuming too much or too little gas and the resultant costs and penalties this can cause.For example, Shell Gas Direct’s Automated Meter Reading (AMR), fitted to an existing gas meter, communicates consumption data back via mobile technology for display on a secure website. This allows the customer to view and analyse the energy profile of their processes and, as a result, monitor efficiency.”AMR is also accepted by the scheme as evidence of ’early action’ proactive measures to reduce emissions ahead of the scheme’s full adoption,” says Shell’s Mike Hogg. “This will be one of three components counting towards a company’s league table position. Companies have until April 2011, the end of the CRC’s first year, to maximise this early action rating by installing technologies such as AMR.”The economic incentive to reduce emissions will increase as the cost of energy rises, which the current consensus predicts it will. Baked goods manufacturers should see the CRC as an important step-change in how they manage energy and, as such, engage positively and early with its requirements and aims.”Adopting energy-efficient practices is an excellent chance to not only mitigate the environmental impact of business but also build encouraging frameworks to better manage energy usage, he says. Bakeries must also seize the opportunity to understand their energy demand and protect their bottom line.In its statement, Allied says: “When planning or undertaking capital products or purchasing new equipment in both manufacturing and supply chain, environmental factors, such as energy efficiency, play a key role in our decision-making processes.”Every company will have to make its own assessment, balancing energy costs and payments under the CRC or CCL schemes against capital and other investment costs with longer-term benefits. But how much difference this will all make to retailers and consumers remains unclear. Allied says: “There is no compelling evidence yet that consumers are making active choices between brands based on their carbon footprint.” But it adds: “We believe our customers are looking to work with suppliers who take their environmental impact seriously.”One way or another, it seems, that seriousness is being scrutinised ever more closely. Four steps bakers should take to prepare for the CRC Finsbury Food group likens the CRC to the Producer Responsibility Obligations for packaging, whereby companies are required to pay for recovering and recycling the packaging they use. “The CRC is similar, but with the difference that if you can demonstrate year-on-year reductions in energy consumed, you’re rewarded for it,” says Finlay.Those rewards work on two levels. Firstly, those demonstrating improved energy efficiency are eligible for bonus payments. Secondly, the annually-published league table is designed to be a prime benchmark for assessing sustainability. The EA’s Grayling says: “The league table is a very public judgement on how seriously you take your environmental responsibilities. If organisations don’t take up the challenge, there’s a risk to their reputation and their pockets.”Taking up that challenge can take many different forms. Says Diston-Hunter: “There are probably several hundred initiatives that a bakery could put in place to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions.” These range from behavioural changes in operating equipment to equipment modifications and alternative fuels. As he points out: “There is often no correlation between the size of the investment and the size of return.” The Carbon Trust is currently working with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and the bakery sector to investigate making step-change reductions in CO2 emissions from the baking process, by accelerating innovation in process control, the uptake of low carbon technologies and product strategies. Companies involved in the work include Allied Bakeries, Jacksons and Irwins. Current work is focused on the baking process by building a detailed picture of process energy use. This is based on information from process operators, equipment manufacturers and sub-meter data from equipment in use at representative sites. A feedback session looking at the findings of the investigations will take place in early June.”In other similar industry sectors, we have worked with to date, we have identified opportunities that could save an average of 28% annual CO2 emissions per sector,” says a spokesperson for the FDF. “Once this first stage of work is complete, we will aim to build a business case for the baking sector to implement the carbon saving opportunities identified, by undertaking focused research or demonstration projects.”Companies involved in bakery, equipment suppliers, technology developers and other stakeholders are all invited to propose projects that could be adopted across the sector. Contact The Carbon Trust on [email protected] Who is affected – and how? Bakers leading the agenda Initial assessments for the CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme were carried out during 2008. Any business then using at least one half-hourly electricity meter (HHM) must register under the CRC with the Environment Agency (EA) by 30 September 2010. Organisations should already have been informed about this during 2009. Of those companies, any that consumed at least 6,000 MW hours through all their HHMs during 2008 (equivalent to roughly £500,000 worth of power) and not already part of a formal emissions reduction scheme, will need to participate. This involves monitoring energy consumption and purchasing carbon allowances. Those companies demonstrating the greatest reductions in energy consumption will receive “financial and reputational rewards”, says the EA, including pride of place in an annual league table of CRC performance. It says that its communications campaign will continue up to the end of the registration period, and will include a series of ’How to register’ surgeries. l The EA’s CRC helpdesk can be contacted at [email protected] Or go to: www.environment-agency.gov.uk/crc Gas emissions l Proactively verify whether your company qualifies. Penalties for non-compliance can be severe, so it’s worth being prepared for the timetable of registration and reportingl Check whether correspondence and information about the CRC is going to the right people in your companyl Consider what information you need from your energy supplier and which format it should be presented in l Use the CRC as an opportunity to secure support within your company for environmental improvements Rewards for reduction The environment may have been a notable absentee from the General Election campaign, but make no mistake it has not gone away. Companies picking their way through the government’s Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) know this only too well. This is yet another Government-sponsored initiative, along with the Climate Change Levy (CCL), attempting to monitor and reduce CO2 emissions and more specifically energy consumption. Since launch, the CRC has been given the slightly longer, but more explanatory, name of the CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme (CRC EES).The Environment Agency (EA), which is responsible for the scheme, tries to be reassuring about its implications. Says head of climate change and sustainable development Tony Grayling: “Carbon reduction doesn’t need to be complicated or expensive. There are simple and inexpensive steps every organisation can take to cut their energy consumption.”Since last year, the EA has been contacting operations where at least some electricity was supplied on half-hourly metering (HHM) at any time during 2008. Even where a company or plant has subsequently moved away from HHM, it will still need to submit an information disclosure.That is no mean feat. Critically, much hinges on how an organisation’s extent is defined, according to the energyteam consultancy. “This includes applying the Companies Act tests to ascertain how undertakings such as companies, partnerships and unincorporated associations must be grouped together,” says head of social responsibility Stuart Diston-Hunter. Failure to complete the information disclosure stage can incur fines of £500 per meter, he adds.The EA helpfully produced “more than a dozen guides” to the information disclosure part of the process, says energyteam. “But the guides are typically 40 to 50 pages long, and include a lot of detail and terminology,” Diston-Hunter adds.Finsbury Food Group, on the other hand, says its own advisers have like the EA downplayed the complexity of the CRC. Says group buyer David Finlay: “We’ve been led to believe it’s fairly straightforward.” The group is in the early stages of compiling information for the EA. But it does not predict that the details of group structure will be over-complicated. “Otherwise, it’s a matter of totalling up energy usage for the period in question.”Finsbury says it is likely to be over the 6,000 MWh threshold for CRC registration and reporting. “But as we understand it, the trading in carbon credits will not need to happen, because we are already paying the Climate Change Levy,” says Finlay. In fact, like others, Finsbury is eligible for an 80% discount on the levy.A spokeswoman for the EA confirms: “The aim of the CRC is to capture organisations that are not already working on emis-sions reduction under the CCL or other heavy-duty regulation.” She stresses that companies which are unsure about whether the CRC relates to them should consult the EA website (see box-out, right).Like Finsbury, Allied Bakeries says it is already part of the Food and Drink Federation’s voluntary CCL agreement. In a statement, it explains: “We are currently working with internal experts to assess our obligations under the CRC.” Last year, Allied’s Kingsmill became the first bread brand permitted to use the Carbon Reduction label on three of its products.So what about those needing to participate fully in the CRC scheme? “They will need to identify their organisational structure, register, produce a footprint report for the year to 31 March 2011, together with annual reports and an evidence pack proving how data was sourced and calculations were made,” says Diston-Hunter at energyteam.Registration and administration costs will be “a few thousand pounds a year”, he says. But that is clearly not the whole story. “Professional fees and internal administration costs mean that many participants should budget considerably more to ensure compliance,” he adds. Carbon allowance costs are fixed at a minimum of £12/tonne of CO2 until 2013. Around 20% of participants will be audited to ensure that figures are valid, says energyteam.last_img read more

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Hope on flour as large harvest takes down wheat prices

first_imgWheat prices eased in the past week as the world harvest was larger than predicted, offering hope to bakers that flour prices may follow suit.Wheat futures prices (LIFFE, November 2011 contract) fell from £156.65 per tonne on September 29 to £145.50 as BB went to press, on 4 October, on the back of revised estimates of world wheat production by the US Department of Agriculture.The government agency forecast world wheat production in 2011/12 would be 678.1 million tonnes, up six million on the previous month’s estimate. Canada’s wheat crop was predicted to be up 2.5m tonnes to 24m tonnes, and EU wheat production was up 2.3m tonnes to 135.8m tonnes. Harvests in Germany, France and Spain were better than expected, while in the UK the HGCA said the estimated average UK wheat yield was expected to be 4% below the five-year average at about 7.5 t/ha.The quality of the winter wheat crop in the UK was good, with grain protein levels averaging 12.6-12.8%, according to ADAS’ final harvest report, produced on behalf of the HGCA. It also described milling wheat quality as being good, with most at 12.8-13% protein, and Hagberg falling numbers around 300 seconds. For both group 1 and 2 milling wheat, specific weight, Hagberg falling number and protein levels look set to be up on last year’s harvest.last_img read more

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Food Bank of Northern Indiana mobile food distribution schedule, July 13-17

first_img Previous articleGoshen Health releases new visitor restrictionsNext articleGoshen homeless advocate group looking to build permanent shelter Brooklyne Beatty Facebook (Photo supplied/Food Bank of Northern Indiana) The Food Bank of Northern Indiana has released next week’s schedule for mobile food distributions.Monday, July 13, 2020 – Elkhart County 10 a.m. – Noon EDTWHERE:  Hawthorne Elementary School, 501 Lusher Avenue, Elkhart, IN 46517Wednesday, July 15, 2020 – Kosciusko County 10 a.m. – Noon EDTWHERE: Kosciusko County Fairgrounds, 1400 E. Smith Street (front parking lot), Warsaw, IN 46580Wednesday, July 15, 2020 – LaPorte County 10 a.m. – Noon CDTWHERE: LaPorte Civic Auditorium, 101 Ridge Street, LaPorte, IN 46350Thursday, July 16, 2020 – St. Joseph County 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. EDTWHERE: Food Bank of Northern Indiana, 702 Chapin Street, South Bend, IN 46601Friday, July 17, 2020 – Starke County 10 a.m. – Noon CDTWHERE: Knox Elementary School, 210 W. Culver Road, Knox, IN 46534Food is always distributed on a first come, first served basis for up to 400 households while supplies last.Food will be distributed drive-thru style. Just remain in your vehicle and pop open your trunk to receive your items. An area will also be available to load items if your trunk does not open. Google+ TAGSdistributionsElkhart Countyfoodfood bankKosciusko CountyLaPorte Countymobilenorthern indianaSt. Joseph Countystarke county Food Bank of Northern Indiana mobile food distribution schedule, July 13-17 Twitter WhatsApp Google+center_img IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market By Brooklyne Beatty – July 9, 2020 0 669 Pinterest Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Pinterestlast_img read more

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BSU Study: 68,000 Indiana students don’t have internet at home

first_img Google+ BSU Study: 68,000 Indiana students don’t have internet at home WhatsApp Twitter (“Keyboard of a computer” by Marco Verch, CC BY 2.0) A Ball State study estimates at least 68-thousand Indiana school kids don’t have Internet access at home.The Census Bureau says one in five Indiana households lacks Internet access. Ball State economist Michael Hicks says most of them don’t have kids. But he estimates one in 15 do. The total could be as high as 84-thousand, or one in 13.Hicks says the heaviest concentrations of unwired students are in Indianapolis and in rural areas, in the counties surrounding Terre Haute and in northeast and southeast Indiana. He says parts of northwest Indiana, like Gary and Michigan City, are close behind.Unsurprisingly, the study finds low-income families and single-parent households are least likely to have Internet access. And Hicks says while the study didn’t quantify it, there are probably three times as many students whose connections are too weak to support learning tools like assignment downloads or Zoom classrooms.Because of the pandemic, many school districts are either starting the year online or using a hybrid of online and in-person classes. Hicks warns students without connectivity are starting out behind because of learning time they lost when the pandemic halted the last school year. Hicks says it’ll take a community effort to keep them from losing more if school goes online again.Hicks notes Ball State cranked up the wi-fi in its buildings so people could get access in university parking lots over the summer. He says communities need to think outside the box, perhaps by retrofitting vacant warehouses or big-box stores as socially distanced classrooms.Governor Holcomb announced a 62-million-dollar grant fund last month to help schools get devices and connections to students who don’t have it. Pinterest Pinterest IndianaLocalNews Previous articleIndiana high school sports are on as planned for fallNext articleIndiana GOP reaching out to minorities for support Network Indiana Twitter Facebook Facebook Google+ WhatsApp By Network Indiana – July 30, 2020 2 283 last_img read more

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Mishawaka crash involving Indiana State Trooper results in injuries

first_img Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Mishawaka crash involving Indiana State Trooper results in injuries Pinterest By Tommie Lee – September 1, 2020 0 248 WhatsApp Google+ (Photo supplied/Elkhart Truth) A rollover crash Tuesday afternoon in Mishawaka involving a State Trooper resulted in minor injuries.It happened at the corner of Main and Battell Streets.The Trooper’s car had front-end damage as a result of the crash, and the other car ended up on its side. The driver of that vehicle reportedly didn’t see the trooper while crossing Main Street.That driver suffered minor injuries and the trooper was said to be up and moving when first responders arrived. Facebook Previous articleElkhart County Board expands landfill, approves bridge design fundingNext articleGun business booming in Indiana, leading to ammo shortage Tommie Lee Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Google+last_img read more

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Governor Holcomb to receive letter full of complaints about unemployment benefit hangups

first_img Twitter By Network Indiana – September 2, 2020 4 489 Google+ Google+ (Photo supplied/State of Indiana) The latest complaints about Indiana’s unemployment system are going straight to the governor.The group Indiana Unemployment Peer to Peer Information, which says it has seven thousand members, sent a letter to Governor Holcomb, this week, explaining their frustration.The group says people have waited up to 15 weeks for their unemployment claims to be processed.The letter points to slow responses, improperly trained workers, bad information, and a lack of accountability among its chief concerns. Facebook IndianaLocalNews Pinterest Governor Holcomb to receive letter full of complaints about unemployment benefit hangups Facebook Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleSen. Todd Young still bullish on new round of federal pandemic assistanceNext articlePete Buttigieg to begin podcasting on Sept. 9th Network Indiana WhatsApplast_img read more

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