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Episcopal churches offer a mix of in-person and online worship…

first_imgEpiscopal churches offer a mix of in-person and online worship options for Holy Week, Easter By Egan MillardPosted Apr 1, 2021 Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Clergy from St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia, distribute palm fronds on Palm Sunday, March 28, 2021. Photo: Dillon Gwaltney/St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] For the second year in a row, the liturgical journey of Holy Week is happening under the cloud of a pandemic. But this year is a little different. While last year’s Holy Week and Easter services were almost entirely online, many congregations are offering some form of in-person worship this year.With diocesan guidelines for COVID-19 restrictions varying widely, Episcopal churches are taking a variety of approaches. Having services outdoors, weather permitting, is one option churches have taken throughout the pandemic. The traditional Lenten practice of the Stations of the Cross also has been easily moved outdoors by many churches.The Church of the Holy Nativity in Weymouth, Massachusetts, began Holy Week by inviting parishioners to its outdoor Palm Sunday service. “God willing and weather cooperating,” they were invited to celebrate the Eucharist on the church lawn. “Please arrive with [a] mask and your own folding chair,” parishioners were advised.Holy Nativity is also one of a growing number of churches that have resumed in-person worship, albeit with protocols in place to reduce the likelihood of coronavirus transmission. While Maundy Thursday and Good Friday services will be held on Zoom, the church will have three Eucharist services in the church on Easter Sunday. With the number of indoor occupants limited to facilitate social distancing, parishioners must reserve seats online. At those services, the church will offer Communion and some familiar Easter hymns “for a few [choir members] to sing and the rest to hum joyfully together.”The Maundy Thursday service, which traditionally includes a foot-washing ritual that commemorates Jesus’ actions on the night before his crucifixion, is a little trickier to host in person. At St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia, the Maundy Thursday Eucharist will be celebrated via a prerecorded video, and parishioners may come to the church afterward to receive the consecrated bread and pray in the pews. The traditional stripping and washing of the altar will also be done on video.Many churches are taking the hybrid approach and offering a mix of in-person and online services. At St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Columbus, Ohio, Easter Sunday services will be held via Zoom, with the option to come to the church and receive the Eucharist afterward. But the Easter Vigil service will be held in person – reservations required – and will not be livestreamed. The service will begin in the church courtyard and move into the building about halfway through.This Easter comes after a full year of the COVID-19 pandemic and its toll on physical and mental health; widespread economic hardship; and the societal crises of police brutality, racism and a violent insurrection. The widening availability of COVID-19 vaccines has offered some hope that the nation will return to a semblance of normality by this summer, but infection rates indicate the pandemic is far from over. Reported coronavirus cases in the United States have risen 13% over the past week, and deaths have risen 9%.Clergy from St. Bartholomew’s Church in New York City record a virtual Palm Sunday service on March 28, 2021. Photo: St. Bartholomew’s ChurchIn New York City, where the exposure risk remains “extremely high,” churches have not yet resumed in-person worship. One element of the Maundy Thursday service, the all-night vigil over the Reserved Sacrament that recalls the hours Jesus spent in the Garden of Gethsemane, has been brought online by churches like St. Bartholomew’s in Manhattan. The church has decorated one of its chapels to look like a garden, and the sacrament will be kept there overnight, which parishioners can keep watch of via livestream. Half-hour sign-ups throughout the night are offered in the hope “that at least two people will keep watch at all times through the night.”Episcopalians can still attend virtual services specifically designed for online worship, like the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Easter service or Washington National Cathedral’s virtual Holy Week services, which even include “private online Zoom chapels” for confession and reconciliation.The creativity and innovation in worship formats, both virtual and in person, reflects a total transformation in the life of the church and society to adapt to the pandemic. In his Easter address, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry noted the “hardship and toil” of the past year but also the simultaneous joy of the resurrection. Suffering, he said, does not require the cessation of praise and worship.“In spite of injustice and bigotry, hallelujah anyhow,” he said. “In spite of war and violence, hallelujah anyhow. In spite of the fact that this Easter is the anniversary of the assassination and the martyrdom of Martin Luther King Jr., hallelujah anyhow. In spite of the fact that these are hard times, hallelujah anyhow.”Correction: An earlier version of this story contained incorrect descriptions of the Maundy Thursday services planned for St. Stephen’s in Richmond, Virginia.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service COVID-19, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Holy Week/Easter An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

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Ellis Park Handicapping Contest Aug. 20 Sending 4 To NHC

first_imgEllis Park, in conjunction with AmWager, is staging a live-money handicapping tournament that will send its top four finishers to the National Horseplayers Championship in Las Vegas, Feb. 9-11, 2018.The Bluegrass Tournament Presented by AmWager will be Sunday, Aug. 20, the same day that Ellis Park stages its pair of stakes for 2-year-olds.Entry fee is $500: $200 going toward prize money, and $300 for each participant’s bankroll. Players bet a minimum of $20 (win, place, exacta or double) on each of 10 contest races, comprised of Ellis Park’s card and optionals to be announced, keeping their bankroll balance after the competition. Participants can have up to two entries, with the tournament capping at 150 entries.The top four finishers based on bankroll earn automatic berths to the NHC at Las Vegas’ renovated Treasure Island Hotel and Casino, with hotel room provided and airfare paid up to $500.Ron Geary, Ellis Park majority owner and president, long has been an enthusiastic handicapping contest player. That includes finishing second in the 2011 National Handicapping Championship, as it was called until recently. A member of the Kentucky Entrepreneur Hall of Fame, Geary was a pioneer in online handicapping contests, launching with McKay Smith “The BIG One” mega-contest and the popular Horsetourneys.com website that helped propel the handicapping-contest circuit into the big-time.“Although business demands make it difficult for me to actively participate as I did in the past, I’ve never lost my passion for handicapping-contest competition,” said Geary, who bought Ellis Park from Churchill Downs Inc. in 2006, a year after a tornado ravaged parts of the track. “We’ve had some economic challenges and Mother Nature has thrown us some curveballs, but Ellis Park is on an upward trajectory and it seemed a good time to bring back the handicapping contest. We think having a live-money competition with four berths to handicapping’s Super Bowl on the line, staged against the Midwest’s best summer racing and an outstanding jockey colony, will make this an attractive event for horseplayers.”Registration is available in advance by calling Ellis Park group sales at 812-435-8905 to pay the entry fee with a credit card. Registration on the day of the contest begins at 10 a.m. Central, with cash and credit cards accepted. Entry fees can be paid by check (must be postmarked by Aug. 4) in the amount of $500, payable to Ellis Park, and sent to Amanda Phipps, 3300 U.S. Highway 41 N., Henderson, KY, 42420. Advance registration is strongly encouraged to avoid lines the morning of the contest.Rules and pre-registration here www.amwager.com/bluegrasstournamentThe National Horseplayers Championship and the NHC Tour are owned and operated by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association. Participants in the Bluegrass Tournament must be members of the NHC Tour in order to earn a qualifying spot for the NHC in Vegas. NHC Tour membership costs $50 per year and can be obtained through ntra.com/nhc.The Bluegrass Tournament will be run by AmWager and its parent company AmWest Entertainment, a diversified account-wagering and international simulcast services company based in Prospect, Ky.Horsetourneys.com is conducting feeder tournaments, with the winners getting the $500 entry fee and bankroll paid to the Bluegrass Tournament. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare ‘We think a live-money competition with four berths to handicapping’s Super Bowl on the line … make this an attractive event’ — Ron Gearylast_img read more

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Charlie K. Sprague, 94, Brookville

first_imgCharles K. “Charlie” Sprague, age 94, of Brookville, Indiana died peacefully early Saturday morning August 17, 2019 at his residence in Brookville.Born June 6, 1925 in Kurtz, Indiana he was the son of the late Charlie & Helen (Fleetwood) Sprague.  He was a United States Navy Veteran of World War II.  On August 17, 1952 he was united in marriage to the former Betty L. Goen, and she preceded him in death on March 10, 2014.Charlie was retired, having taught school and coached at the former Brookville High School and later Franklin County High School for 39 years.  He also was self employed selling insurance for many years.  He served on the Franklin County Community School Board for 24 years; and held various offices throughout that time on the board.He was a member of the Brookville United Methodist Church, the Bernard Hurst Post #77 of the American Legion where he was Past Commander, and had also served for many years as the Chaplain of the Firing Squad; the Harmony Masonic Lodge # 11 F. & A.M. for over 60 years; as well as the Franklin County Retired Teachers Association.Survivors include two sons & daughters-in-law, Randy & Sherry Sprague of Greenfield, Indiana and Rusty & Jean Sprague of Brookville, Indiana; three grandchildren Justin Sprague of Indianapolis, Indiana, Ryan Sprague of Indianapolis, Indianan and Amber Kriech of Carmel, Indiana.In addition to his parents and wife of 62 years, Betty, he was preceded in death by a daughter, Cathy Kriech.Family & friends may visit from 4 until 7:00 P.M. on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville, where Masonic Memorial Services will begin at 7:00 P.M..Pastor Steve Rundel, of the Brookville United Methodist Church, will officiate the Funeral Services on Thursday, August 22, 2019, 10:00 A.M., at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home.  Burial with full military graveside honors by the Bernard Hurst Post #77 of the American Legion will follow in Maple Grove Cemetery in Brookville.Memorial contributions may be directed to the Alzheimer’s Association or the Franklin County Community Foundation for the Brookville Aquatic Center.  The staff of Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home are honored to once again serve the Sprague family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

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Five takeaways from Day 1 of the Raiders’ draft

first_imgInstead, solid … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceALAMEDA — So you thought the Raiders were going to spin off the rails Thursday night, and do something crazy like trade up to draft Kyler Murray or take Dwayne Haskins.That it would be chaos with coach Jon Gruden and general manager Mike Mayock running the show in the NFL draft after having the audacity to tell their scouting department their job was done once the evaluations were complete.last_img read more

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Planetary Radiometric Dates 1/3 Younger

first_imgThe half-lives of radioactive isotopes may not be as well-known as thought.  One decay rate frequently used to date solar system objects had to be adjusted down to 66% of its former assumed value, impacting theories of planet formation.PhysOrg headlined, “‘Faster-Ticking Clock’ Indicates Early Solar System May Have Evolved Faster Than We Think.”  The old decay rate for samarium-146 (146Sm) was re-evaluated by a team from Argonne National Laboratory, Hebrew University, two Japanese universities and the University of Notre Dame.  The old value of 103 million years for its half-life was recalculated at 68 million years, two-thirds of its previously measured value.146Sm has become the main tool for establishing the time evolution of the solar system over its first few hundred million years. This by itself owes to a delicate geochemical property of the element samarium, a rare element in nature. It is a sensitive probe for the separation, or differentiation, of the silicate portion of earth and of other planetary bodies.The smaller value, “previously adopted as 103 million years, to a much shorter value of 68 million years,” the article continued.  It “has the effect of shrinking the assessed chronology of events in the early solar system and in planetary differentiation into a shorter time span,” the article said.  The story was reported a month ago by Science Daily.The article put a positive spin on this adjustment, saying, “The new time scale, interestingly, is now consistent with a recent and precise dating made on a lunar rock and is in better agreement with the dating obtained with other chronometers.”  It seems they could just as well have said that the other chronometers are now cast into doubt by the adjustment of 146Sm, which was also considered a precise chronometer till now.In any case, it is disturbing that a physical value that is “out there in the world” could be found to be so far off by human measurement.  How many published papers are affected by this change?  Papers often quote radiometric dates to 4 or more significant figures.  Theorists rely on these values.  If values are not discovered but “adopted,” is it possible there was motivation by theorists to “adopt” a different value to create consistency with other chronometers?  Does the new value make the “assessed chronology of events in the early system” more or less plausible?  What will be the ripple effect from here on for a chronometer that ticks 33% faster than previously thought?  Who will go back and correct theories based on the previous value?  These are questions the press releases never ask. (Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Azam’s varsity raided

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh police on Tuesday raided Samajwadi Party leader Azam Khan’s Mohammad Ali Jauhar University in Rampur and recovered books which were allegedly stolen from a 250-year-old madrasa, officials said. “A team from the Rampur district administration and the police raided the university and recovered around 400 to 500 books of a madrasa with it’s stamp. The exact number of stolen books are yet not clear. The probe is on in the matter,” said I-G, law and order, Praveen Kumar here. Madrasa theftThe team was probing a case, registered last month, on the theft of thousands of books from the ancient Madrasa Aliya in Rampur which is about 250 years old. The recovered books are ancient and valuable, he said.last_img read more

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