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Open letter to Wanadoo’s director general: “As you surely don’t know…”

first_img Organisation Help by sharing this information As Wanadoo is on the point of announcing a partnership with Tunisia’s leading Internet operator, Reporters Without Borders points out that Tunisia censors the Internet and imprisons its users. News RSF_en As Wanadoo is on the point of announcing a partnership with Tunisia’s leading Internet operator, Reporters Without Borders points out that Tunisia censors the Internet and imprisons its users.Letter to Olivier Sichel, Director General of Wanadoo Dear Mr. Sichel,We have learned with amazement that the company you head will, in the coming days, announce the launch of a strategic partnership with the Tunisian Internet operator Planet. We are perfectly aware that Wanadoo is a private company and that it is not your job to defend human rights, but we believe that investing in the Tunisian Internet raises a number of ethical issues to which we would like to draw your attention. We are moreover convinced that you are unaware of the facts that we are going to present to you and that, once alerted, you will agree with us that this partnership will have a negative impact on the image of your company, in which the French state has a 40 per cent stake.As you surely do not know, the Tunisian government, after already completely gagging the traditional media, has set up a very effective system of Internet filtering. Using the Internet access provider Planet, your future partner, it blocks access to all the political websites critical of President Ben Ali, as well as those of the main international human rights organizations. Even the Reporters Without Borders site, www.rsf.org, has been inaccessible for years in Tunisia.As you surely do not know, a Tunisian lawyer, Mohammed Abou, has been imprisoned for more than a month for posting an article on the Internet about prison conditions for political detainees in Tunisia. At the same time that you are covering Tunis walls with posters announcing Wanadoo’s arrival in Tunisia, dozens of Tunisian lawyers are staging a sit-in at the bar association to demand their cyber-dissident colleague’s release.As you surely do not know, eight young Tunisian Internet users from the southern town of Zarzis received sentences of up to 26 years in prison for visiting websites considered illegal by the authorities. They are now languishing in prison in horrifying conditions.As you surely know, the Internet has become an essential vehicle for news and information, especially in countries where the traditional media are under the government’s control. Helping the Internet to grow in a developing country is obviously a laudable aim, but we must warn you that if you try to do this in Tunisia, you will have to accommodate to its government’s systematic violations of free expression.I hope this letter will have enlightened you as to a situation about which you were clearly unfamiliar. We remain at your disposal should you wish additional information.Sincerely,Robert MénardSecretary-General April 11, 2005 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Open letter to Wanadoo’s director general: “As you surely don’t know…”last_img read more

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When It Comes to Fighting Ocean-Bound Waste, Collaboration Is Key

first_imgIn the UK right now, there is a huge spotlight on the crisis being created in our seas by plastic waste. The reality of the situation is scary – and hard to ignore. Every single year, 8 million metric tons of plastic enter our seas, endangering marine life and polluting our waters. And it’s not just marine life being affected. With the vast majority of plastic pieces in the ocean less than 5mm in size, these are often eaten by fish, meaning anyone who consumes an “average amount” of seafood ingests approximately 11,000 plastic particles a year – a scary thought when you consider that over exposure to plastic chemicals can lead to certain forms of cancer, immune disorders and obesity.Thanks to programs like the BBC’s Blue Planet II and campaigns like Sky Ocean Rescue, we are all now aware of the scale of the problem, but awareness is only part of the equation. We also need to take action. At Dell, we were first made aware of this issue in 2016 through our relationship with actor and activist Adrian Grenier and his work with the Lonely Whale Foundation. This led to us looking for ways to address the ocean plastics challenges within our business, and packaging was a natural place to start. So, following an initial feasibility study, we launched a pilot project in early 2017 working with groups from coastal areas around the world to collect plastics from waterways, beaches, shorelines and areas near the coasts. We now use this plastic waste to create packaging trays for our XPS 13 2-in-1 and more recently, our XPS 15 2-in-1 laptops. We anticipate that this pilot will keep 16,000 pounds of plastics out of oceans initially, and in support of UN SDG Goal 14, we are committed to increase annual usage of ocean-bound plastic 10x by 2025.And while we were proud of this meaningful contribution to tackle the issue, we quickly identified a critical barrier to successfully scaling their efforts: absence of an operational and commercially viable ocean-bound plastic supply chain. So, along with the Lonely Whale Foundation, with support from UN Environment, we set out to convene a group of companies to join forces to create an open-source initiative to develop the first-ever commercial-scale ocean-bound plastics and nylon supply chain. Called NextWave, founding members including Dell, General Motors, Trek Bicycle, Herman Miller, Interface, Van de Sant, Humanscale and Bureo, will share responsibility in development of a sustainable model that reduces ocean-bound plastic pollution at scale, while creating an economic and social benefit for multiple stakeholders. We think the work of this group will divert more than 3 million pounds of plastics from entering the ocean within five years, the equivalent to keeping 66 million water bottles from washing out to sea.https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=EQ5Sh5HQV8wWe believe collaboration is really the only way we’ll address many of the challenges facing our world today, which is why I was truly honoured to be asked to participate in a recent high-level meeting with The Prince of Wales’s International Sustainability Unit (ISU) on ‘Keeping Plastics and Their Value in the Economy and Out of the Ocean.’ Attended by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, C.E.Os and senior executives from a range of organisations including Government, private sector and N.G.Os working to apply principles of circular economy to the current plastic value chain, it was a privilege to represent Dell and the work we are doing, and have an opportunity to discuss best practices with others pursuing the same goals.LONDON – UK – 31st Jan 2018. HRH The Prince of Wales, as Patron, hosts a reception and meeting of the ISU plastics forum at 11 Carlton House Terrace in London Photograph by Ian JonesReflecting on this meeting, what really struck me was the realisation that even three years ago, sustainability was typically limited to a subject matter expert within an organisation, whereas now, it is a critical part of business strategy and every single CEO and senior executive at the table was able to speak with authority on the role their company wants to play in finding solutions to environmental issues. I know in my role as general manager for Dell EMC in the UK and Ireland, I have conversations with customers every single day about how we are creating a more sustainable business for our company and the world around us, and how important it is for them to not only work with companies who are acting responsible, but also learn from us how they can adopt similar practices. It really does demonstrate the huge opportunities that collaboration presents for the corporate world to play a meaningful and measurable positive impact for the future – and I’m very proud to be a part of it.If your company is interested in getting involved, you can apply or find out more at https://www.nextwaveplastics.org/apply/last_img read more

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At the Races pens exclusive Hong Kong racing rights deal

first_img StumbleUpon At The Races (ATR) and Sky Sports Racing are to be the new exclusive, non-terrestrial, broadcast home of Hong Kong racing in the United Kingdom and Ireland until July 2022, it has been revealed today.Revealed by ATR and The Hong Kong Jockey Club (HKJC), who have overseen racing in the territory since 1984, it’s to see a record £120m ($HK 1.2 billion) in prize money featured as part of the 2018/19 season.Broadcast across the UK and Ireland is to take place on At The Races until the end of this year, before taken over by its successor channel Sky Sports Racing, which is to launch in full HD on or before January 1st, 2019, becoming the eleventh Sky Sports channel.George Irvine, Commingling Development Director at the HKJC, explained: “Sky Sports is recognised globally as a benchmark in sports broadcast and innovation. This new partnership aligns with The Hong Kong Jockey Club’s deep-rooted values in world-class leadership and continuous development.“We want to continue to engage UK and Ireland audiences in our premium racing product. ATR and Sky Sports have significant fan bases already across TV and digital channels, and we will work with them not just on live race coverage but on a weekly, dedicated preview programme to showcase Hong Kong racing.”The HKJC boasts some of the world’s most prestigious thoroughbred races, and one of the largest pool betting operations with annual turnover of £11.9bn ($HK 124.2bn).The Longines Hong Kong Cup (2000m), worth HK$28m (£2.8m), is one of the two richest races in the world at a mile and a quarter on turf. The Longines Hong Kong Mile (1600m) and Longines Hong Kong Sprint (1200m) are the most lucrative Group 1 turf races in the world over their distances, worth HK$25m (£2.5m) and HK$20m (£2m) respectively.Matthew Imi, Chief Executive of At The Races, added: “The Longines Hong Kong International Race is one of the world’s greatest racing fixtures. We are delighted to partner with the Hong Kong Jockey Club to deliver ground breaking coverage of this spectacular event, and to promote consistently throughout the rest of the season the high-quality racing that the club supports.” Share Submit Share UK racing remains hopeful for crowd pilot events August 14, 2020 Related Articles Ascot adds three-year extension to Sky Sports Racing deal August 14, 2020 HKJC closes OCBBs amid rising public health concerns July 13, 2020last_img read more

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Big Home, LEED Platinum Rating, but Still a Slow Sell

first_imgHow much is a green rating worth in Southern California’s Orange County? On average, homes in the county, particularly in its more prosperous neighborhoods, recently have been listing well north of $700,000, according to real estate search engine Trulia. But for prospective buyers looking in the above-average price category, and even at luxury homes, adding green credentials to the list of extras isn’t guaranteed to work marketing magic.That’s the impression left by the sales history of the first single-family home in Orange County to land LEED for Homes Platinum certification: a 4,900-sq.-ft. modern Craftsman with six bedrooms, six and a half baths, a 1,000-sq.-ft. kitchen, and golf course view. A real estate development investor, Steve Blanchard, bought the home that originally occupied the 0.32-acre lot for $1.7 million three years ago. By December 2008, deconstruction of the old house and recycling of usable materials were complete (the original garage was retained) and foundation work had begun. Construction progressed throughout last year and the house was awarded Platinum certification on January 28, 2010.In March, Blanchard told the Daily Pilot that he originally considered moving his family into the house, but then decided to put it on the market.The right buyer might not necessarily be green-mindedIt seems likely the original asking price, $2,990,000 (about $600 per sq. ft.), gave buyers pause all by itself, especially given the down real estate market. According to a brief recently published in the Orange County Register, the listing, after five price drops, fell to $2,199,009 and the house now has a buyer, although the final sales price has yet to be disclosed.An interesting point, cited by the listing broker, Liz Noriega, is that the buyers weren’t really looking for a green home at first – just a big one. “When they understood all the green factors, they realized how much they’d be saving in the long term,” Noriega told the Register. “They’re just getting into being environmentally conscious, and they realized this is a good thing.”Among the building’s performance-oriented features: R-38 ceiling insulation; blown-in cellulose, to R-21, in exterior walls; insulation installed behind tubs and fireplaces before installation; insulation in double walls supported with blocking shelves every 24 in.; attic access doors, attic stairs, and whole-house-fan openings insulated to R-22; tube skylight ducts wrapped with R-8 duct insulation; a 3.6 kW solar power system; and east-west axis orientation to maximize solar gain in the winter, when the average low temperature is in the high 30s and the average high is in the mid-60s. Average highs from June through October are in the 80s.last_img read more

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Does Open Source’s Rise Spell The End Of Traditional Software Vendors?

first_imgWhich is not, of course, the same as taking over the software industry.Wither The Traditional Software Vendor?Back in 2007, SugarCRM CEO Larry Augustin keynoted the Open Source Business Conference, and relayed a disturbing fact: over time, open-source companies tend to become more like the legacy vendors they displace. Augustin analyzed the P&Ls of Salesforce.com, Red Hat and other vendors and came to the conclusion that “by year six, the financials of an open source company tend to look identical to that of a traditional proprietary software company.”Why? Because ultimately open-source companies, like the traditional vendors they seek to displace, must also rely on expensive sales and marketing machines to get to scale. The laws of business gravity still apply.Not surprisingly, many open-source vendors also look like traditional vendors almost from the start, in the sense that they combine open source and proprietary software (usually tooling and add-ons) to acclerate sales. In the Hadoop market, Cloudera uses this so-called “Open Core” model, while Hortonworks does not. While it remains to be seen who will win the long run, in the short term Cloudera leads the market and will reportedly have over $100 million in sales in 2013.At the same time, legacy tech vendors have embraced open source when it suits them. EMC has built a Big Data solution around Hadoop. IBM has made billions by selling hardware and software solutions around open source, with a mega services business also heavily dependent on open source. Old dogs sometimes can learn new tricks, apparently.No One Can See The Open Source FutureAs such, while it seems a safe bet that open source will continue to grow, it’s less clear that this will be the end of traditional vendors like IBM, SAP or Oracle.As Marten Mickos, CEO of Eucalyptus, an open-source cloud vendor, suggested to me in an email exchange:We said [open source would eliminate proprietary vendors] 10 years ago, too, and then VMware came from nowhere and became 4-5 times Red Hat’s size. AWS is built on open source, but it isn’t open itself. DynamoDB and EMR compete against open source without supporting open source.I don’t want to sound negative on open source. I just don’t think it’s necessarily possible that it will win everything in infrastructure.For companies like Oracle I guess it’s too early to tell whether they are like DEC or like IBM. The former disappeared, the latter remains.It would be convenient to draw a line in the sand and call for the death of everything old and the elevation of everything new. But it would also be wrong. The history of what has succeeded and what has failed in open source is messy and inconclusive. We shouldn’t expect the future to be any different. Related Posts Matt Asay Tags:#Android#Apple#cloud computing#Hadoop#iOS#legacy vendors#mobile#Open Source 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair After years of struggling to swim against the tides of open source and cloud computing, traditional software vendors are clearly under fire. At the same time, it’s also clear that open source is driving most of the big trends in technology today, from mobile to cloud to Big Data.What isn’t clear, however, is that going forward all technology vendors will become Red Hat.Open Source’s Outsized ImpactTen years ago, a new open source company or project was news. Not anymore. Open source dominates mobile, with Android displacing the seemingly unbeatable iOS in both smartphones and tablets. Open source also dominates cloud, with every significant cloud platform except Azure built using open source. And even Azure treats open-source technologies as first-class citizens on its platform. And open source dominates Big Data, with Hadoop and NoSQL technologies the major forces used for managing the world’s data explosion.But open source is more than software.Now we have “open source” car and bike sharing in Minnesota, an open source village cellular network in Mexico, open source data centers and more. While not truly open source—many of these projects don’t adhere to the Open Source Definition and don’t even try to do so—each indicates just how pervasive open source’s impact has been.Indeed, open source is so big, it has even taken over Dilbert:last_img read more

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Indigenous restaurant in Toronto ignites debate over ethics of seal meat

first_imgTORONTO – There are many dishes on the menu at Kukum Kitchen that reflect chef Joseph Shawana’s upbringing on the Wiikwemkoong Unceded Reserve on Manitoulin Island, but one in particular has attracted a great deal of controversy: seal tartare.An online petition launched last week called for the Toronto restaurant to remove seal meat from its menu, stating that “seal slaughters are very violent, horrific, traumatizing and unnecessary.”The petition has attracted over 4,500 digital signatures from around the world and prompted a slew of one-star reviews for the restaurant on Facebook and Yelp.Toronto-based Anishinaabe artist Aylan Couchie launched a counter-petition in response, which has been shared by musician Tanya Tagaq and has nearly matched the support of the original campaign.Lenore Newman, the Canada Research Chair for Food Security and Environment and author of “Speaking in Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey,” considers some of the practices in raising chicken and pork for consumption to be far more cruel — and far more common — than the seal hunt.“Even if (the original petition) is well-intentioned, there are literally thousands of restaurants in Toronto that serve meat that is produced in much worse ways,” says Newman, adding that seal meat is an easy target for criticism because its roots are Inuit.“I do think there is some underlying racism in our culture around other people’s food. In Canada we have this huge history of oppressing Indigenous cuisine, and telling Indigenous people how they should be eating.“Controlling people’s food is about controlling them.”The practice of hunting seal, whether for meat or fur, has been controversial for years. High-profile animal rights advocates including Pamela Anderson, Paul McCartney and Morrissey have criticized Canada’s seal hunt and imports of seal products are banned in the United States and the European Union.Defenders of the seal hunt cite its economic and cultural significance, particularly in Inuit communities.The author of the original petition, whose name is no longer attached but who has been identified elsewhere as “Jennifer,” said she was not singling out any specific cultural practice.“Although this is an Indigenous restaurant, the seal meat comes from a commercial company called SeaDNA therefore has nothing to do with the Indigenous hunt,” she wrote online.In her counter-petition, Couchie wrote that she disagreed with that assessment.“After reading our emailed concerns, Jennifer’s response was to assure us that she is ‘not anti-Indigenous’ and stated that, ‘the slaughter of any being is wrong’ — which begs the question: Why is Jennifer N. targeting an Indigenous restaurant when there are literally hundreds of restaurants in Toronto that serve meat?”Seal hunting advocates say that like any other commercial meat trade, the practice can be done ethically. In a statement shared by Couchie on Twitter, Shawana said he spent months researching seal meat suppliers before settling on SeaDNA.“As an avid hunter I was taught at a very young age to respect the animals as a whole,” Shawana said.He did not immediately respond to an interview request on Thursday.Jonas Gilbart, a sales representative for SeaDNA, says the company follows a sustainable model and uses methods that are more humane than the ones used by commercial slaughterhouses.“Without sustainability, we don’t have an industry,” Gilbart says.Seal hunting is heavily regulated by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and Gilbart estimates that last year, SeaDNA only harvested about 17 per cent of the quota set by the government.“We don’t harvest without knowing that we can actually utilize the animal,” he says.Like Newman, he thinks there’s some degree of hypocrisy in animal rights advocates who protest the seal hunt rather than factory-farmed chickens or industrial abattoirs.“If (seals) weren’t cute, we would probably have a much easier job.”last_img read more

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BIRKS AND TELEFILM CANADA ANNOUNCE THIS YEARS RECIPIENTS OF THE BIRKS DIAMOND

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Top Row L-R: Wendy Crewson, Jean Yoon, Micheline Lanctôt Bottom Row L-R: Marie Clements, Sophie Dupuis, Jasmin Mozaffari “We are very proud to have established a legacy of supporting Canadian female talent within the film industry,” said Jean-Christophe Bédos, President and CEO, Maison Birks. ”Our partnership with Telefilm Canada celebrates these women who are bringing a unique perspective to Canadian film creativity.”This year’s group of honourees join the ranks of Birks Tribute alumni including: Alanis Obomsawin, Sarah Polley, Tatiana Maslany, Sarah Gadon, Jennifer Baichwal, Karine Vanasse, Deepa Mehta, Louise Archambault, Catherine O’Hara, Sandra Oh, Patricia Rozema, Amanda Brugel, Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs, Évelyne Brochu, Tantoo Cardinal, Stella Meghie, Susan Coyne, among others.DIRECTORMicheline Lanctôt, director, studied music and visual arts as she completed her BA. She entered the wonderful world of film animation in 1967, and after one year at the National Film Board of Canada, joined Potterton Productions where she worked first as an assistant, then as an animator for five years. She started as an actress starring in Gilles Carle’s La Vraie Nature de Bernadette, the first Canadian actress to be in the official competition at the Cannes Film Festival in 1972. She then pursued both acting and animating for five more years, acting next to Richard Dreyfuss in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz by director Ted Kotcheff. In 1979 she wrote and directed her first feature film, L’Homme à tout faire, selected at the prestigious Director’s Fortnight in Cannes. The film also won the Silver Medal at the San Sebastian Film Festival. Her second feature, Sonatine, won the Silver Lion at the Venice Mostra in 1984. She has written close to twenty screenplays, directed twelve feature films, including one feature documentary, written two novels, staged four plays, and has been working continually both as an actress in films and television, and as a writer-director for the past thirty years. In 1993, her film Deux Actrices won Best Picture at the Rendez-vous du Cinéma québécois. Her last feature, Une Manière De Vivre, will be coming out in the fall of 2019. In 2000 she received Quebec’s highest honor, le Prix Albert-Tessier for her work in films, and in 2003, she was one of the laureates of Canada’s Governor General’s Award. Pour l’amour de Dieu, the 2010 film she wrote and directed, won the Special Jury Prize at the Shanghai International Film Festival. She was also awarded the Prix Jutra Hommage in 2014. She has been teaching Acting and Directing for the Screen at Concordia University’s Mel Oppenheim School of Cinema in Montreal since 1981. She is currently working on her next feature, Sylvaine Ou L’esprit De La Forêt.ACTORSWendy Crewson, actress, was the recipient of a star on Canada’s Walk of Fame in 2015; and the ACTRA Earle Grey Award, given to fewer than 30 collective recipients since 1986, in recognition by ACTRA and the Canadian Entertainment Industry, for Lifetime Achievement in Television. Wendy has garnered critical and popular acclaim, as well as multiple awards for her extensive body of work in film and television. Her resume features more than 100 titles, including credits like: Sarah Polley’s indie feature Away From Her; The Vow, with Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum; the Winnie Mandela biopic Winnie, alongside Jennifer Hudson and Terrance Howard; The Santa Clause trilogy opposite Tim Allen; The Clearing, with Robert Redford; Eduardo Ponti’s Between Strangers, with Sophia Loren; The Last Brickmaker in America, with Sidney Poitier; Bi-Centennial Man with Robin Williams; The Sixth Day with Arnold Schwarzenegger; and of course, her role as Harrison Ford’s First Lady in Air Force One. Wendy starred in five seasons of CTV’s hit medical drama Saving Hope, for which she won Best Actress in a Featured Supporting Role at the 2013 CSAs. Wendy was also in the critically acclaimed, Oscar-nominated film, Room with Brie Larson; and appeared opposite Ellen Page in Patricia Rozema’s Into the Forest. On the small screen, Wendy recently starred in the CTV/ION series The Detail, for which she was just nominated for a 2019 CSA. She also recurs on the fun, period mystery Frankie Drake; the comedy Workin’ Moms, both on CBC; and in the AMC series The Son, opposite Pierce Brosnan. Wendy continues to be as busy as ever. She is currently shooting the third season of CBC’s popular series Frankie Drake, in addition to the first season of her new Hallmark series, When Hope Calls. She will be seen next in her recurring role on the upcoming Netflix series, The October Faction.Jean Yoon, actor, began her theatre career in the early 1980s in Toronto performing with Upstage Theatre, Toronto Free Theatre and Canasian Artists Group. In the 1990s, Jean was active as a cultural equity advocate and new play producer. She was Cross Cultural Coordinator for Theatre Ontario 1991/92, and then Co-Artistic Director of Cahoots Theatre Projects 1992 to early 1994, founding Lift Off! and cementing Cahoots’ role as a leader in new play development for playwrights of diverse cultures. Jean’s stage credits include Necessary Angel, Young Peoples Theatre, Factory, Tarragon, Cahoots Theatre Projects, Crows, Civilized Theatre and Die in Debt. Jean originated the role “Umma” in the Toronto Fringe production of Kim’s Convenience in 2011 and performed the show at Soulpepper Theatre, The Grand Theatre London, National Arts Centre, Theatre Calgary, Theatre Aquarius, the Capitol Theatre in Port Hope, and the Pershing Square Signature Centre in New York. Jean is best known for her work on the CBC television adaptation of Kim’s Convenience, for which she has received the ACTRA Award for Outstanding Performance Female 2017, and two CSA nominations. Other screen credits include Orphan Black, Dragon Boys, The Expanse, Save Me and voicing Connie in the Emmy Award winning PBS show Peg + Cat.SCREENWRITERMarie Clements, screenwriter, has ignited her brand of artistry within a variety of mediums including film, TV and live performance. Her feature drama Red Snow has recently been nominated for ten Leo Awards and will be released this fall.  Her feature music- doc, The Road Forward, produced by the NFB premiered at Hot Docs opened the 2017 DOXA Documentary Film Festival, receiving five Leo Awards including Best Production, Best Director, and Best Screenwriter. The Road Forward has screened at over 300 venues in North America also receiving a Best Director Award at the North American Indian Festival in San Francisco, as well as a Writer’s Guild Nomination for Best Documentary Screenplay, the WFF Women on Top Award and the DGC BC Spotlight Impact Award in 2018. Her documentary Looking at Edward Curtis premiered at DOXA and The Yorkton Film Festival with four nominations for best documentary and premiered on Knowledge Network last summer. As a writer, director and producer her award-winning films have screened at Cannes, MOMA, VIFF, WIFF, the American Indian Film Festival and ImagineNATIVE Film Festival. Her fifteen plays have been presented on some of the most prestigious stages for Canadian and international work garnering numerous awards, translations, and publications including the 2004 Canada- Japan Literary Award, and two prestigious Governor General’s Literary Award nominations.  Her play The Unnatural and Accidental Women will open the inaugural season of the National Arts Centre’s Indigenous Theatre in Ottawa this September, and her libretto Missing will be on a national tour with Pacific Opera Victoria this fall. MCM is an independent media production company owned and operated by Clements specializing in the development, creation and production of innovative works of media that explore an Indigenous and intercultural reality.EMERGING TALENTJasmin Mozaffari, emerging director, is an award-winning Toronto-based writer/director who studied Film at Ryerson’s School of Image Arts. A number of her short films including Firecrackers (2013), Wave (2015), and sleep on the tracks (2017) screened at the Toronto International Film Festival, the Vancouver International Film Festival and numerous other festivals across Europe and the US. Her debut feature film Firecrackers, based on the short, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2018, and won Best Film in Competition at the Stockholm International Film Festival. The film went on to win 2 Canadian Screen Awards in 2019 including the award for Achievement in Direction. Variety proclaimed Jasmin as a “major talent” and Firecrackers was named a New York Times Critic’s Pick in 2019.Sophie Dupuis, emerging director, is notorious for rattling audiences with her striking films. She tells disturbing, yet moving stories – sometimes dark but overall, filled with light. Exhibiting her prowess of interplaying tenderness and belligerence, she crafts canvasses of broken families and untamable characters. With her many short films that have garnered international success, Sophie quickly realized her love for actors whose performances have been acclaimed. Chien de garde, her first feature film, is a breathtaking blow-to-the-chest portrayal of impetuous characters caught in a whirlwind of violence. After winning the award for mise-en-scène at the Saint-Jean-de-Luz festival, witnessing her actors win for their work in her film, and receiving eight nominations at the Gala Québec Cinéma, including best film, best direction, and best screenplay, Sophie was selected to represent Quebec in the 2018 Oscars season. Sophie Dupuis is currently working on her second feature film Souterrain, which will focus on the world of mines.Nomination process and juryIn addition to an internal selection committee, Telefilm and Birks called upon the following organizations to be part of the nomination process for the Birks Diamond Tribute to the Year’s Women in Film (in alphabetical order): ACTRA (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists), the Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec (ARRQ), the Directors Guild of Canada (DGC), the Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma (SARTEC), Union des Artistes (UDA), and the Writers Guild of Canada (WGC).An 18-member jury was tasked with the selection of this year’s honourees. The pan-Canadian jury is made up of the following journalists, bloggers and on-air personalities covering the world of art, culture and entertainment: Victoria Ahearn (The Canadian Press), Catherine Beauchamp (Le Tapis Rose), Erica Commanda (Muskrat Magazine), Richard Crouse (CTV’s Pop Life), Manon Dumais (Le Devoir), T’Cha Dunlevy (Montreal Gazette), Sholeh Fabbri (ET Canada), Willow Fiddler (APTN News), Noreen Flanagan (FASHION Magazine), Dana Gee (Global TV/Postmedia), Teri Hart (Citytv), Peter Knegt (CBC), Marc-André Lussier (La Presse), Jen McNeely (Shedoesthecity), Katherine Monk (Ex-Press/CBC), Kathleen Newman-Bremang (Refinery29), Jordan Pinto (Playback), and Radheyan Simonpillai (CTV’s Your Morning/NOW Magazine). About Telefilm CanadaTelefilm is dedicated to the cultural, commercial and industrial success of Canada’s audiovisual industry. Through funding and promotion programs, Telefilm supports dynamic companies and creative talent at home and around the world. Telefilm also makes recommendations regarding the certification of audiovisual coproduction treaties to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, and administers the programs of the Canada Media Fund. Launched in 2012, the Talent Fund accepts private donations which principally support emerging talent. Visit telefilm.ca and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/telefilm_canada and on Facebook at facebook.com/telefilmcanada.About BirksBirks Group operates 26 Maison Birks stores in most major metropolitan markets in Canada, one retail location in Calgary under the Brinkhaus brand and two retail locations in Vancouver under the Graff and Patek Philippe brands. The Birks brand is a leading fine jewelry, timepiece and gift brand available at all Maison Birks stores, Mappin & Webb and Goldsmiths in the United Kingdom in addition to other luxury jewelry retailers across North America. Birks was founded in 1879 and has become Canada’s premier luxury brand. Additional information can be found on the Birks website, www.maisonbirks.com.center_img Advertisement Facebook Montréal/Toronto – Birks , the official jewelry sponsor of the Toronto International Film Festival, and Telefilm Canada today announced the honourees for the annual Birks Diamond Tribute to the Year’s Women in Film. The Tribute, taking place on Wednesday, September 4 at a luncheon at the Four Seasons Hotel, celebrates Canada’s diverse film landscape by way of its storytellers on both sides of the camera. This year’s distinguished honourees include director Micheline Lanctôt; actors Wendy Crewson and Jean Yoon; screenwriter Marie Clements; and emerging directors Jasmin Mozaffari and Sophie Dupuis. Each honouree in the directing, acting, screenwriting and emerging talent categories will receive an honourarium from Birks to support their next project.A pan-Canadian jury of 18 journalists and on-air personalities covering the world of art, culture and entertainment were entrusted to select the honourees.“It is inspiring to be in our 7th year of honouring among the best female talent in Canada at the Birks Diamond Tribute event,” said Christa Dickenson, Executive Director, Telefilm Canada. “This year’s honourees are telling our country’s powerful, touching and sometimes comical stories to the world, and we are looking forward to bringing them together to celebrate their incredible body of work.” Twitterlast_img read more

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How FiveThirtyEights NCAA Tournament Forecasts Did

We love making predictions at FiveThirtyEight, but we know that they’d be meaningless if we didn’t check to see how accurate they turned out to be. Over the past month, we forecast every NCAA college basketball game for the women’s and men’s tournaments, updating our numbers almost a hundred times as 132 teams were pared down to two champions.So let’s relive the NCAA tournament not through “One Shining Moment” but through a vetting of FiveThirtyEight’s forecasts.MEN’SOne way to assess our accuracy is to pit ourselves against Vegas, the gold standard of sports predictions. We took our final probabilities from before each March Madness game — converted to a point spread1The calculation for converting a win probability to a point spread in R: -qnorm(win_prob, mean = 0, SD = 10.36). That standard deviation is derived from a model Nate Silver built several years ago, based on about six years’ worth of tournament games. We then rounded to the nearest half point. — and used them to place hypothetical bets on the final Vegas line. For example: Vegas had Texas at -2.5 over Butler, but we gave the Longhorns just a 54 percent chance of winning. This implied a line of -1, so we bet on Butler to cover. (And we won!)Here’s how our hypothetical bets did through the round of 64. Note that if our implied line matched Vegas’s exactly, we wouldn’t place a hypothetical bet on that game.A 17-13 record is strong — enough to maybe make some money. More importantly, our model performed well when it differed significantly from Vegas. In seven games, marked in gray above, our model had a perceived edge of three points or more — a sizable gap in forecasting between the two basketball forecasts. In these games, our bets went 5-2.After the round of 64, things didn’t go so great:Through these last 31 games, our spreads tracked Vegas very closely. We disagreed on the favorite just once (correctly picking Notre Dame to beat Wichita State), and there were no games where our perceived edge was three points or greater. In 21 games, our edge was half a point to a point, a relatively small advantage to place actual money on. Luckily we didn’t, as these hypothetical bets went 6-15. When our perceived edge was greater than a point, our bets went 3-3. That gave us an overall March Madness record of 26-31, with 10 no bets.Betting against Vegas is great, but we’re aware that many of our readers stopped looking at our forecasts the moment they turned in their bracket. This means that the performance of our first, pre-tourney predictions was especially important.If you built a men’s bracket using only FiveThirtyEight’s initial numbers, you would have gotten 70 percent of the games correct. It’s hard to tell if we should be happy with that number — it’s certainly not going to impress sammyholtz16 or anyone else on top of the ESPN Bracket Challenge leaderboard. A better way to assess probabilistic forecasts is a calculation known as a Brier score, which we can use to compare ourselves to other models like Ken Pomeroy’s, Jeff Sagarin’s,2Sagarin just produces a power ranking, so for that model we used the converted probabilities that appeared in The New York Times. The Power Rank, ESPN BPI, and numberFire.A short, but still mathy, example of how Brier scores work: Our initial predictions gave No. 6 seed Xavier a 26.5 percent chance of advancing to the Sweet 16, while Ken Pomeroy’s log5 model gave them a 24.8 percent chance.3It’s sort of unfair to compare our forecast to Pomeroy’s, as our model incorporates his numbers as one of our variables. Pomeroy’s ratings and Jeff Sagarin’s power rankings can be used to forecast the tournament, but they were built to be useful throughout the entire college basketball season; they’re intentionally more generalized. Xavier did advance, so our Brier score for that event was (1 – 0.265)^2, or 0.54, while Pomeroy scored a 0.57. Being closer to zero is better, so we were (slightly) more accurate for that prediction.We calculated each model’s average Brier score for each round of the tournament. To benchmark all the results, we added a “chalk” model that assigned a 100 percent probability to the higher seed winning each game.4For games between teams with the same seed, the S-curve was used as a tiebreaker. Not every model predicted the play-in games, so for consistency we used every site’s predictions from before the First Four, but only measured the accuracy of predictions from after those games were played. Here are the results, including an overall average:FiveThirtyEight came in third, and all the models beat the chalk. Our forecasts started strong, with the lowest Brier score for the round of 64. We assigned the highest probabilities to Georgia State’s and Dayton’s upset chances — 24 and 38 percent, respectively. The Dayton pick — calculated before the play-in games began — was a coup for the geographic component of our calculations: Dayton had a home game against Boise State for its play-in, and then had to travel just a few dozen miles for its round of 64 matchup.NumberFire came in second, leaning heavily on favorites throughout the tournament. This killed numberFire early on — it gave Iowa State a 96 percent change over UAB — but this confidence paid off as the bracket became chalkier and chalkier. Other models, like Pomeroy’s, consistently underrate the favorites’ probability of winning, leading to weaker Brier scores.Once Duke started rolling, The Power Rank pulled away. Among the models we looked at, the site gave the Blue Devils the highest probability of advancing to the Sweet 16 (88 percent), Elite Eight (71 percent), Final Four (46 percent), and Championship game (27 percent). Duke was given a 12 percent chance to win the title at the tournament’s start. To compare, our model and numberFire each put Duke at six percent, while BPI had it at just three percent. Given that Duke is traditionally undervalued in bracket pools, fans who built their brackets on The Power Rank’s numbers likely had a pretty good tournament.WOMEN’SVegas might be the gold standard of sports predictions over in the men’s tournament, but unfortunately we couldn’t find a reliable source of betting lines for the women’s NCAA tournament (nor could we find them for any games other than the championship). This year was the first time we made March Madness predictions for the women’s tournament, and we knew there would be less data available for making the women’s model.Because there’s no major alternative we can use to judge our forecast, we were left with an imperfect measure: Did it do better than if we had just picked favorites? It’s a draw! if you built a women’s bracket using only FiveThirtyEight’s initial numbers, you would have gotten 84 percent of games correct, compared to … 84 percent if only favorites won.But Brier scores can help settle the tie. Here’s what happened when we compared our probabilistic results to the all-favorites picks.Our model outperformed the chalk model in the opening rounds (as it should have), but in some matchups it did more than just outperform. We gave DePaul, a No. 9 seed, a 77 percent chance of upsetting Minnesota, a No. 8 seed, and the Blue Demons won by seven. In the Spokane region, we gave Gonzaga a 48 percent chance of upsetting George Washington, nearly a coin toss, and sure enough, Gonzaga made a strong run all the way to the third round.We didn’t predict the Dayton upset of Kentucky (we gave them only a 22 percent chance of making it that far), and by the Sweet 16, the chalk model began to outperform us. Perhaps our model’s biggest oversight was placing too much weight on South Carolina making it to the national championship over Notre Dame, which was due in part to the geographical advantages we assigned to their playing in Greensboro. Both teams were No. 1 seeds, but Notre Dame was the higher 1 seed. We gave South Carolina a 40 percent chance of making it to the finals, and Notre Dame only a 34 percent chance. This was a very chalky tournament to begin with, however, with heavy, heavy favorites like UConn and the rest of the No. 1 seeds dominating the bracket.In total, however, we outperformed the chalk, and we’re pleased with how our first women’s March Madness predictions did. We’ll have more data to build on for next year, plus a better understanding of the fat-tailed distributions particular to the women’s tournament — and we’ve got a pretty good idea of who our model will favor again.CORRECTION (March 15, 2016, 12:10 p.m.): An earlier version of the first footnote in this article misstated the equation used to calculate implied point spreads from win probabilities. This calculation used a mean of zero, not one. The numbers that appeared in the article were not affected. read more

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Mens Hockey No 7 Ohio State loses to No 5 Notre Dame

Ohio State then-freshman goaltender Tommy Nappier covers up a puck during Ohio State’s 4-0 win against Wisconsin on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Credit: Nick Hudak | For The LanternThe No. 7 Ohio State men’s hockey team split its Big Ten opener with No. 5 Notre Dame after dropping the second game of the road series 2-1.Ohio State (4-3-1, 1-1) shutout Notre Dame (4-3-1, 1-1) in the first game of the series 1-0 and led or tied most of the game Saturday night before a late goal by the Fighting Irish sealed the 2-1 victory for Notre Dame.After a scoreless first period featuring 13 shots by each team, senior forward Mason Jobst tallied the first goal of the game in the second period with assists by junior forward Carson Meyer and senior forward Freddy Gerard.The Fighting Irish quickly tied it up minutes later with an even-strength goal by sophomore forward Colin Theisen.A scoring drought took place for the rest of the second period and well into the third before Notre Dame senior forward Joe Wegwerth scored the eventual game-winning goal with just under seven minutes remaining.Ohio State didn’t convert on either of its two power play attempts of the night but killed every penalty they gave Notre Dame, an improvement on the previously lackluster special teams that plagued the Buckeyes through the first part of their season.The Buckeyes tried to tie the game with what time they had left, bringing sophomore goaltender Tommy Nappier out of the net with around a minute remaining, but their comeback effort fell short.Nappier allowed two goals and saved 36 shots in his fourth start in the net this season.The Buckeyes will stay on the road next weekend against Colgate, with the puck dropping on Friday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 4 p.m. read more

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