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Clerics sometimes break the law in the pursuit of justice

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Michael Hartney says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 17, 2012 at 4:49 pm I think it is inappropriate for the clergy to wear their vestments when protesting. It gives the public impression that they are authorized to represent TEC and that the entire Church agrees with their political positions. That is not the case. TEC is as politically diverse as any other group in the country. It is fine, by me, if the clergy wears street clothes when protesting. That is their individual decision and some consider it to be Christ like. But don’t claim to represent all Episcopalians. We claim to encourage diversity – just not political diversity. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (10) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Clerics sometimes break the law in the pursuit of justice September 18, 2012 at 4:38 pm I, too, was a frequent member of the congregation at the Pentagon for the Pentagon Masses. We were all arrested for ‘making a loud and unusual noise’ in the Concourse of the Pentegon. The Councourse being, at that time, a publically-accessible shopping mall within the confines of the Pentagon. We even bought the communion bread from the Pentegon Bakery in the mall. It was stamped ‘Pentagon.’I do not agree that Episcoipal Clergy (Bishops, Priests, Deacons) should not wear their clerical vestments/collar/etc. when protesting an unjust law. We are making a public statement about the Church, yes … but so did Jesus. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET JOHN SCHAFFER says: September 17, 2012 at 1:39 pm I would say that if the clerics want to truly identify with those protesting, then shed the clerical garb, stoles, and albs that often gets attention and preferential softer treatment. Join the anonymous faces and voices and then you will have genuinely risked the consequences. I would also hasten to add that the Occupy Movement largely discredited itself due to its anarchy-driven public face. They may have had sympathy in some circles, but now their tactics, violence, and destruction to private property shows nothing less than a mob mentality that strains for any credibility. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Steve Norcross says: Michael Mornard says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Rev. Richard Aguilar, the Rev. Jack Stanton and Claudino “Tito” Rosario, a member of UniteHere Local 362 in Orlando, Florida, wait to be arrested at the May 8 demonstration in support of fired casino workers. Photo/Ari Romer[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Jack Stanton is a veteran of civil rights and Vietnam War demonstrations. But he went one step further in May when he volunteered to be arrested during a protest on behalf of casino workers fired for union organizing in Hallandale Beach, Florida.Other clergy, including Episcopalians, also marched in the demonstration. “I took the extra step of volunteering to be arrested because I thought it would call more attention to what we were doing, and it proved to be so,” said Stanton, 75, priest associate at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Miami. He was arrested along with the Rev. Richard Aguilar, another priest in the Diocese of Southwest Florida who since has left parish ministry to work as a union organizer. “We were a photo op.”Getting arrested is not something that appears on most priests’ resumes, but over the years a small, steady stream of Episcopal priests and sometimes bishops has engaged in civil disobedience as part of how they “strive for justice and peace among all people” in living out the Baptismal Covenant. More recently, some have joined the Occupy movement, which marks its one-year anniversary today. Others have been arrested protesting wars or environmental or labor practices.“I would say it’s been a steady but small presence throughout, from the anti-war days” of the Vietnam War era, said Mary Miller, who recently retired as coordinator of the Consultation, an umbrella organization for Episcopal peace and justice organizations, and formerly served as executive secretary of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship. “EPF was quite deeply involved with things like the Pentagon Masses.”During the Masses, small groups would begin to celebrate Eucharist in the main concourse of the Pentagon, she explained. “Inevitably, they would be arrested after they were asked to please leave and didn’t.”Civil disobedience is “part of our tradition … I think this thread has been in Anglicanism all along,” she said. “There are plenty of people who would argue that this is what Jesus was doing and teaching, and we do claim that. It has not since early days been the dominant thread in our history, at least not since Constantine, but the witness has always been there.“And it has always been challenged by the folks in charge at any given time,” she added, noting how Utah Bishop Paul Jones “was drummed out of the House of Bishops during World War I” for being a pacifist.Participating in civil disobedience is a matter of personal conviction by a priest or bishop, said the Rev. Brian Grieves, retired director of the Episcopal Church’s peace and justice ministries, including the Office of Government Relations in Washington, D.C.“I can’t recall that the church has ever said anything at General Convention about civil disobedience per se as a policy matter,” he said. “I think for many people in the church it’s a time-honored form of nonviolent resistance to issues of conscience.”“We’re not a traditional peace church, like the Mennonites or Quakers,” Grieves said. “But … even though there’s no official statement, I certainly do think theologically that there’s a strong argument to be made for nonviolent forms of resistance on matters of conscience and that the church has a strong tradition of that, even if it’s unofficial, and I think that’s part of who we are.”Powerful symbolThe Episcopal calendar of saints includes Jonathan Daniels, a white seminarian fatally shot in 1965 in Alabama after pushing a black teen to safety when a part-time deputy sheriff pointed a shotgun at her outside a store. Daniels had just been released from jail, having been arrested for participating in a voter rights demonstration.While Episcopal laity participate in civil disobedience, the image of people in clerical collars protesting and being handcuffed can provide a powerful illustration of the church’s stance on an issue.Since the Occupy movement began last September, hundreds of protestors have been arrested across the country. But the trespassing arrest of retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard,68, in his purple cassock during a Dec. 17 protest in New York drew particular attention as a symbol of support by some in the church for the movement.The symbolism of clergy being arrested “really matters,” Miller said. “It leads the rest of us to feel like we’re in good company and that we’re not alone.”“I think we remain clergy-dependent in some ways, particularly when it comes to public faces,” she said. “There still is an urge for the church leaders to speak.”Diocese of California Bishop Marc Andrus, 55, was arrested wearing his cassock in 2006 for blocking access to the federal building in San Francisco in a protest against the Iraq War.“I’m aware that a bishop is a very public figure and that by participating in a broader act of civil disobedience that I would be helping call attention to the issue in a way that some people don’t have the ability to do,” he said.“It was my thought that one has to be judicious about how often and for what reasons one engages in civil disobedience,” he added. “I’ve been in many demonstrations and rallies and protests and witnesses and vigils since then around a variety of issues … but I have not engaged in civil disobedience since then.”Being bishop “is a different order of ministry than a priest or a deacon or a lay person,” he said. “I am answerable to my diocese and to the larger church, but I am also answerable for how I use the political power, the symbolic power that has been given me.”“It’s more visible than that of a local congregation leader, and I think I have a responsibility to think through how I use that,” he said. “To always not use it is not a reasonable answer, it seems to me.”Andrus, who is part of Bishops Working for a Just World, said he was “delighted” by Packard’s participation in the Dec. 17 protest. “I would like to see more active bishops in addition to retired bishops take that kind of stand.”Several other clergy were arrested along with Packard, including the Rev. Michael Sniffen, rector of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew, Brooklyn, New York.“It really was unplanned, unpremeditated,” said Sniffen, who attended the Dec. 17 Occupy Wall Street rally and decided on the spot to enter fenced property owned by Trinity Episcopal Church, Wall Street, and risk arrest in solidarity with the Occupy protestors he had been supporting. “I still feel that I did the right thing and acted according to my conscience.”Since then, Sniffen has been involved in other local actions addressing economic issues. He joined about 30 clergy, including more than half a dozen colleagues from the Diocese of Long Island, for example, in protesting New York’s budget cuts during a hearing at city hall.Like Andrus, Sniffen said he saw his actions as part of his obligation as a church leader. “If I’m going to speak about something from the pulpit and not do something with my own person to try and transform that which is causing God’s people pain, that which is unjust, then I really have no business talking about it.”“It seems quite clear to me that the gospel comes to life when clergy are really engaged in all aspects of community of life and are not just talking about community life,” said Sniffen, 31. “Politics in this country is in such a sad state. Now more than certainly at any other point in my life it seems really important to speak up as a community leader as well as faith leader.”Living out the gospelStanton also said he saw his civil disobedience in biblical terms. “A main thrust of the Bible is justice and reaching out to the oppressed and the weak. I was taken by [the case of] these 10 workers because they are just about powerless, and they’re being brutally dealt with – not physically, but enough to cause dreadful harm to their families.”“Jesus in his own life went to the cross. It was doing the will of God as a protest of sorts. He was standing there and just taking it from Pilate,” said Stanton, who said he looked to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights protestors as an example of this. “They knew they were going to get arrested, but they weren’t going to stop because they knew they had the truth on their side. They took the punishment.”“To me … that is the witness of the Bible and of Jesus, and I think that in my own life I need to show that.”The Rev. Joshua Griffin is arrested in the Montana statehouse during a protest against mining and exporting coal. Photo/Rae BreauxThe Rev. P. Joshua Griffin, arrested in August as part of a protest against plans to begin mining coal at Otter Creek in Montana and to ship it to West Coast ports for export overseas, said he found support for his action within the church and its theology.“One reason I felt called to participate in this action was really because as a priest I am called to be obedient to the teachings of our church and to those that have authority and pastoral leadership,” he said. He cited in particular the “very powerful language” of the House of Bishop’s 2011 letter from Quito, Ecuador, urging Episcopalians to work toward climate justice and General Convention’s passage of Resolution B023 in July calling on the church “to resist the development and expansion of ever more unconventional, dangerous and environmentally destructive sources of fossil fuel and move toward conversion to more sustainable sources.”“I feel that my work in Montana and participation in this action was in direct obedience to this teaching of our church,” said Griffin, 31, priest associate at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church in Portland, Oregon, and former missioner for environmental justice in the Diocese of California. “I’m very excited that our official church policy is to resist these kinds of evils.”Civil disobedience “is a very old tradition in the Episcopal Church,” said Griffin, who also was arrested three times while working in California. He identified his mentor as his college chaplain, the Rev. Canon Henry Atkins, who once served as chaplain to the Black Panthers, worked to integrate Southern churches during the civil rights movement and hid Central American refugees at a New Jersey church during the 1980s.One reason he knew he had a home in the Episcopal Church was its commitment to the Incarnation and “incarnational politics,” Griffin said. “I knew that I was called to this kind of work, and I knew that it would be supported.”The Rev. Jim Lewis did community service working on a garbage truck after being arrested for protesting Iraq War funding. Photo/ Mike YoungrenThe Rev. Jim Lewis of Charleston, West Virginia, a long-time activist who will turn 77 on Oct. 1, has been arrested while protesting support for U.S. activities in Central America, supporting striking Virginia coalminers, protesting Iraq war funding, and helping immigrant poultry workers in Delaware. Ordained in 1964, he participated in civil rights demonstrations but didn’t become involved in civil disobedience until the 1980s.“I went to Central America and saw people who were being devastated by U.S. policy,” he said. “I came back here saying, ‘We need to change U.S. policy. We’ve got to stop funding this killing.”He got arrested in a congressional office in Michigan, because “I felt like something more was required from me at that point: putting my body on the line. … It wasn’t something that I felt was a better thing to do than I had done in the past. It was just almost a natural evolution for me.”Lewis said he’d like to see more clergy engaging in civil disobedience but recognizes not everyone is called to such action.“It does seem to me that there’s a time for clergy to step out there,” he said. “Not everybody’s called to do that, but I think some of us are.”“I don’t see it as any badge of merit. It’s not a God and country award. … I just saw it as another way to step up to the plate, if you’re called to do that, and to make your testimony. But I don’t see a whole lot of it in the Episcopal Church.”The challenge of nonviolenceLooking back, Stanton said he believed more clergy participated in civil disobedience during the civil rights movement.But civil rights activist the Rev. Canon Edward Rodman said, “In general clergy were not particularly notable … for their commitment to nonviolence. They were pretty good with civil disobedience, and I think that distinction you need to make pretty sharply. Civil disobedience really involved the willingness to be arrested. A lot of folks were willing to do that, but they were not necessarily ready to take a beating, and that is the real difference.”“There were many clergy of that era who were very courageous and who were not necessarily involved directly in the movement but who stood up and did courageous things, and so that is not to be discounted,” he said.Rodman, 70, has been involved in the Episcopal Church’s antiracism training and is John Seeley Stone professor of pastoral theology and urban ministry at Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.“Most of my actual civil disobedience and arrests occurred while I was in high school and college, not after I was in seminary and beyond,” he noted. “I was more of a trainer and adviser at that point.”And he continues in that role. “Here in Cambridge, we have a really wonderful group of old folks like myself who spanned the civil rights and the peace movements … We have formed a collective to try to help the younger anarchists and others to try to be clear on what is and isn’t appropriate in the area of civil disobedience and what kind of serious spiritual commitment you have to have.“I would say that the primary difference between then and now is the fact that this younger group really doesn’t get that,” he said. “It’s much more impatient, and – I wouldn’t say they’re fearless; the term I would use is that, because most of them are privileged, they don’t appreciate the degree to which oppression and violence can rain down on them if they’re not careful. And I think that some of them got that bitter experience in Oakland,” he said, referring to violent clashes with police during the Occupy movement in California.During the civil rights movement and the early days of protests against the Vietnam War, he said, “there was a continuum of … spiritual commitment to the discipline of nonviolence and the study of it and the training that went into it.”“Certainly the Occupy people, to their credit, did get the key lesson in any nonviolent social-change movement, and that is the notion of shared leadership,” he added. “It’s about the people who work making the decisions and not the star getting himself set up to get assassinated.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Rector Albany, NY September 17, 2012 at 4:45 pm I recall the witness of a number of clergy in the Diocese of Pennsylvania in the 60’s and 70’s in ways which shook me out of my assumptions about what it means to see law through the eyes of justice in theological way. It’s not me, but it did lead me to a much more mature vision of faith to strive to bear witness to as a priest.Regarding Jonathan Daniels, I see him mostly as an unlikely but very real martyr, taking the bullet meant for the innocent young woman upon himself. Adam Egan says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rob Godwin says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Sharon SheridanPosted Sep 17, 2012 Doug Desper says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem September 17, 2012 at 12:38 pm While I heartily approve of civil disobedience as a tactic, it doesn’t seem to be quite the right word to describe the actions of Jonathan Myrick Daniels and his companions, if it means not complying with unjust laws. Federal law had abolished segregation throughout the United States, but many jurisdictions in the South simply ignored the law. It was the forces of segregation who disobeyed the law, not Daniels. Daniels and others refused to comply with segregation, but in that it had lost any legitimate legal authority they weren’t engaged in civil disobedience, but trying to enforce what was already the law. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC September 18, 2012 at 10:25 pm Ummm…. how about “it’s illegal to fire people for union activity”? That seems to have slid completely by.And clergy should DEFINITELY wear their collars. More and more people see the Church as irrelevant, and if we want to engage people we need to dispel that image. October 3, 2012 at 9:59 am Have we removed Romans 13:1-2 from our Bibles?Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves.And here Paul was talking, not about a democratically elected government, but the tyrannical rule of the occupying Roman army. Stephen Voysey says: Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing October 8, 2012 at 7:25 pm Non Christians could care less that Episcopal clergy are protesting. Grow up. The sixties and seventies are long gone. Get back to baptizing and instructing how to be a disciple of Christ not a cool hipster in the park in handcuffs. God save us! Bill Dilworth says: Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ September 18, 2012 at 12:53 pm The issue here is the spirit. Standing in righteous accusation of others is intoxicating. There are times when social action has been warranted and even essential. But there is always this flip side that needs a good look. Social justice is mare exciting than nursing home visitation. One has to ask what is driving us in each case. Clergy also can be helpful inside these movements contending with their more immature members and dangerous excesses. The Occupy Movement would be a case on point. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rev. Paul Hartt says: Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Environment & Climate Change, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Occupy Movement Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Tampa, FL September 17, 2012 at 8:15 pm This article brought back strong memories, though distant, of my participation in a mass on the concourse of the Pentagon protesting the US involvement in Vietnam. I would not express civil disobedience in the same way today, but at the time I felt right in doing it.Many of us were arrested over the course of several days and weeks, and we were all eventually found innocent of the charge of disturbing the peace. Many ironies in that.I admire the courage of those who speak up, and more for those who are willing to walk their talk. Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed.last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Health Department gives update on coronavirus (May 10)

first_imgHARRISBURG, Pa (WBNG) — The Pennsylvania Health Department gave a statewide update regarding the coronavirus on Sunday. The health department says most of the hospitalized individuals are aged 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in individuals 65 or older. They also say there are 19 additional deaths, bringing the total to 3,707. Pennsylvania residents can sign up for AlertPA, which is a notification system for health, weather, and coronavirus updates. Residents can sign up online at this link. For statewide updates on the coronavirus, visit pa.gov. The state health department reports 227,772 individuals who have tested negative to date. They have provided a breakdown of the patients who have tested positive. The breakdown is as follows: Additionally, the health department reports approximately 3,759 cases among health care workers.  The health department has also provided an update on nursing and personal care homes. They say there are 11,645 cases among residents and 1,645 among employees. That makes a total of 13,290 positive cases at 539 different facilities. The health department also says that out of the statewide total deaths, 2,529 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care homes. For more coronavirus coverage, click here. Nearly 1% are aged 0-4Nearly 1% are aged 5-121% are aged 13-18Nearly 6% are aged 19-24Nearly 37% are aged 25-49 26% are aged 50-6428% are aged 65 or older The health department reports an additional 1,295 individuals who tested positive for the virus. That brings the statewide total to 56,611. last_img read more

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Qatar Airways mulling Premier League sponsorship ‘options’

first_imgDeals agreed by Qatar Airways include shirt sponsorship deals with Italian side Roma and Boca Juniors of Argentina.It also has a sleeve sponsorship deal with Bayern Munich.In addition, Qatar Airways is the “official airline” for world governing body, FIFA as well as CONMEBOL, after it unveiled a deal with the South American football confederation on Wednesday.Akbar said the deals help promote the airline’s image and well as that of Qatar, the football World Cup host in 2022.Outside football, the airline also has deals with the Sydney Swans Australian rules football team and the American basketball side, Brooklyn Nets.Share on: WhatsApp FILE PHOTO: Qatar Airways HeadquartersDoha, Qatar | AFP | The boss of Qatar Airways said Wednesday his company was considering “several options” for a potential sponsorship deal in the English Premier League.Speaking on the sidelines of a ceremony announcing a yet another sponsorship deal, this time with South America football federation, CONMEBOL, Akbar al-Baker said a deal with the world’s richest soccer league was a possibility.“Well, we are looking at several options,” he told AFP.Asked what these might be, he smiled and refused to be drawn.An aide said the airline was in “negotiations”, but added no more.Previous unconfirmed speculation has linked the airline to a potential ground naming deal with Tottenham Hotspur, who are in the process of rebuilding their White Hart Lane stadium.The Gulf airline has a growing number of high-profile football deals but has so far not ventured into the multi-billion pound English league.last_img read more

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Fresh from Cougar Classic title, LVR hosts Stanley Humphries

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers tuned up for the Kootenay High School Zone Rugby Championships by capturing the Cougar Classic tournament Saturday in Red Deer, Alta.The Bombers made it look easy, outscoring the Prairie opposition 95-6,LVR bounced Bishop O’ Bryne of Calgary 24-6 in the final. In the other games, the Bombers rocked Notre Dame, Saskatchewan 29-0 and Notre Dame Red Deer 42-0.The Bombers host Stanley Humphries Rockers Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. at the Lakeside Pitch in the Kootenay High School Zone Rugby Championship.last_img read more

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Collegiate Relay Competitors Enjoy Success at NCAA Championships

first_img Helene Ingvaldsen Kansas State FR Hammer Alexis Woods North Dakota State JR 4×400 Relay Matt Dorsey Air Force SR 1500 Meters Dylan Lafond Illinois SR Steeplechase Maggie Barrie Ohio State JR 4×400 Relay 4×100 Relay Emmanuel Ogwo Iowa FR 4×400 Relay Aaron Mallett Iowa SR 110 Meter Hurdles 4×400 Relay Maya Cody Missouri SO 4×100 Relay USTFCCCA WOMEN’S HONORABLE MENTION ALL AMERICANS – 2017 NCAA DIVISION I OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Christian Brissett Iowa SO 4×100 Relay Danielle Waldner South Dakota SR Shot Put Asa Burke Ohio State FR 4×400 Relay Nick Gray Ohio State SO 4×400 Relay Janee’ Kassanavoid Kansas State JR Hammer Brittany Brown Iowa JR 200 Meters Kaylee Dodd Oklahoma State JR 800 Meters Brett Neelly Kansas State SO Shot Put Emily Grove South Dakota SR Pole Vault Rachel Weber Ohio State SR 800 Meters Reed Fischer Drake SR 10,000 Meters USTFCCCA MEN’S HONORABLE MENTION ALL AMERICANS – 2017 NCAA DIVISION I OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Malachy Schrobilgen Wisconsin SR 10,000 Meters Valerie Thames Missouri JR 400 Meter Hurdles Laulauga Tausaga Iowa FR Discus Jhoanmy Luque Iowa State JR Long Jump 4×400 Relay Aaron Mallett Iowa SR 4×100 Relay Terrell Bradford Air Force FR 4×100 Relay Antwon James Iowa SR Triple Jump Brandon Carnes Northern Iowa SR 100 Meters Brady Grunder Kansas State SR Hammer Chloe Abbott Purdue FR 4×400 Relay Gabi Jacobs Missouri SO Discus USTFCCCA WOMEN’S SECOND-TEAM ALL AMERICANS – 2017 NCAA DIVISION I OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Akia Guerrier Kansas State FR 4×100 Relay Beatrice Hannan Ohio State JR 4×400 Relay DeJuan Frye Iowa SO 4×400 Relay Shardia Lawrence Kansas State SO Triple Jump Carmiesha Cox Purdue 4×100 Relay Jonathan Wells Illinois JR High Jump Nick Gray Ohio State SO 200 Meters Jamiel Trimble Air Force JR 4×400 Relay Jamie Kempfer Missouri SO 10,000 Meters Marcus Neely Indiana State SR 110 Meter Hurdles Collin Hofacker Iowa SO 4×400 Relay Danniel Thomas Kent State SR Shot Put Jamiel Trimble Air Force JR 4×100 Relay Wurrie Njadoe Kansas State FR Long Jump Symone Black Purdue JR 4×400 Relay Taylor Janssen North Dakota State SR Steeplechase Jonathan Davis Illinois FR 5000 Meters Daniel Gagne Bradley JR 1500 Meters Mitch Dixon Kansas State JR Hammer Danniel Thomas Kent State SR Discus Kaela Edwards Oklahoma State SR 1500 Meters Duan Asemota Ohio State Kyle Smith Kansas State SR Hammer Amy Andrushko North Dakota State SR 4×400 Relay Reno Tuufuli Iowa SO Discus Samory Fraga Kent State SO Long Jump Deshawn Marshall Ohio State SR 4×400 Relay Karissa Schweizer Missouri JR 5000 Meters Donovan Robertson Ohio State SR 110 Meter Hurdles Shadae Lawrence Kansas State SO Discuscenter_img Tyler Koss Air Force JR 4×400 Relay Print Friendly Version USTFCCCA WOMEN’S FIRST-TEAM ALL AMERICANS – 2017 NCAA DIVISION I OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Emma Haugen Wisconsin SO High Jump Jhoanmy Luque Iowa State JR Triple Jump Claudette Allen Kansas State JR 4×100 Relay Joshua Thompson Oklahoma State SR 1500 Meters Brenna Detra Wisconsin SR 400 Meter Hurdles Sedacy Walden Air Force SO 4×400 Relay David Timlin Indiana State SR 1500 Meters Savannah Roberson Purdue JR 4×100 Relay Aaliyah Barnes Ohio State SR 4×400 Relay A’Keyla Mitchell Kansas State Sarah Disanza Wisconsin JR 5000 Meters Jamiel Trimble Air Force JR 200 Meters University Division student-athletes that competed at the 2017 Drake Relays presented by Hy-Vee went on to receive a total of 94 All-America honors at the recent NCAA Championships in Eugene, Ore. Of those 94 honorees, 37 were Drake Relays champions and two Drake Relays athletes went on to win NCAA titles as Shadae Lawrence from Kansas State won the women’s discus and Karissa Schweizer from Missouri claimed the women’s 5,000 meter title.The following student-athletes that competed at the 2017 Drake Relays received either first team, second team or honorable mention All-America awards. 2017 Drake Relays Championship are in bold italics.USTFCCCA MEN’S FIRST-TEAM ALL AMERICANS – 2017 NCAA DIVISION I OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD 4×100 Relay Luca Wieland Minnesota SR Decathlon Jasmine Staebler Iowa State SO 800 Meters Champ Page Ohio State Katelyn Weimerskirch North Dakota State SR Hammer Avery Meyers Iowa SR Discus TJ Lawson Kent State FR Decathlon Savannah Carson Purdue SR 4×100 Relay Reinhard Van Zyl Missouri SR Javelin AJ Stevens Kent State SO Triple Jump Rashid Coulibaly Wisconsin FR Pole Vault Ranae McKenzie Kansas State SO 4×100 Relay Devynne Charlton Purdue JR 100 Meter Hurdles Zach Johnson Air Force SR 4×100 Relay Carmiesha Cox Purdue 4×100 Relay Kyle Burdick South Dakota State  SO 1500 Meters Jalen Ford Iowa State JR High Jump David Kendziera Illinois JR 400 Meter Hurdles Nina Schultz Kansas State FR Heptathlon Ranae McKenzie Kansas State SO 400 Meter Hurdles O’Shea Wilson Iowa SO 4×100 Relay James Clark Ohio State Alex Pascal Missouri JR Javelin Craig Nowak Oklahoma State  SR 1500 Meters Champ Page Ohio State SR 400 Meters Tsai-Anne Joseph Missouri SO 4×100 Relay O’Shea Wilson Iowa JR Long Jump USTFCCCA MEN’S SECOND-TEAM ALL AMERICANS – 2017 NCAA DIVISION I OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD Karrington Winters Ohio State SO 4×400 Relay Sedacy Walden Air Force SO 400 Meters Morgan Milbrath North Dakota State SR 4×400 Relay Robbie Anderson Air Force JR 4×100 Relay Symone Black Purdue JR 400 Meter Hurdles LaQuisha Jackson Missouri SR 4×100 Relay Devynne Charlton Purdue JR 4×100 Relay Maggie Barrie Ohio State JR 400 Meters Deshawn Marshall Ohio State SR 200 Meters Rose Jackson North Dakota State SR 4×400 Relay Joe Hardy Wisconsin JR 5000 Meters Mar’yea Harris Iowa SO 400 Meters Katelyn Weimerskirch North Dakota State SR Discus Nick Gray Ohio State SO 4×100 Relay Josh McDonald Wisconsin JR Shot Put Mar’yea Harris Iowa SO 4×400 Relay Deshawn Marshall Ohio State SR 4×100 Relay Savannah Carson Purdue JR Long Jump Ieva Zarankaite Oklahoma State SR Discus David Kendziera Illinois JR 110 Meter Hurdleslast_img read more

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Half-time: QPR 0 Huddersfield 0

first_imgAndy Johnson almost put QPR ahead and they hit the woodwork twice, while Huddersfield missed excellent chances to score during an end-to-end first half at Loftus Road.Rangers boss Harry Redknapp made a major tactical change, pairing strikers Charlie Austin and Johnson, whose header from Niko Kranjcar’s left-wing corner was cleared off the line by Adam Hammill.Without the injured Joey Barton, Redknapp opted for a ‘diamond’ midfield, with Karl Henry in front of the back four and Kranjcar supporting the two strikers.Rangers struggled early on and Daniel Ward fired over after being found by Adam Clayton, and then squandered a golden opportunity by dragging a shot wide having been set up by Oliver Norwood.Huddersfield continued to cause problems and keeper Rob Green uncomfortably pushed over Norwood’s free-kick before saving Nahki Wells’ header.And Rangers had another lucky escape when the unmarked Jonathan Hogg shot tamely at Green despite having plenty of time and space after collecting Ward’s pass.The home side have struggled but have at least been able to rely on Kranjcar’s set-piece deliveries, and another corner from the Croatian led to first Austin and then Henry heading against the bar.QPR: Green, Simpson, Dunne, Hill, Assou-Ekotto, O’Neil, Henry, Carroll, Kranjcar, Austin, Johnson. Subs: Murphy; Onuoha, Traore, Diakite, Phillips, Zamora, Wright-Phillips. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Breaking down A’s options to start the AL Wild Card Game vs Yankees

first_imgSEATTLE — The question everyone will be pondering about the A’s from now until Wednesday’s AL wild-card game, manager Bob Melvin included, is who takes the mound as the starter?It’s a situation that is truly unique to any other team that has come before them when approaching the all-important game. Will it be Mike Fiers or Edwin Jackson? Could they be bold enough to actually become the first team to utilize reliever Liam Hendriks as the “opener” and bullpen a playoff game?It won’t be an easy …last_img read more

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Blast-off for space weather centre

first_imgSouth Africa has opened its own spaceweather centre at the HermanusMagnetic Observatory.(Image: Nasa) Minister Naledi Pandor said the governmentwill start a space programme withinthe next five years.(Image: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Lunga NgqengeleleSpokespersonDepartment of Science and Technology+27 12 843 6802 OR +27 82 566 0446Bongani NkosiSouth Africa’s space weather centre, one of 13 in the world, has been opened in the Western Cape. There are hopes the facility will improve the country’s position in the global space sector and enable it to achieve its space-related ambitions.The centre, located at the Hermanus Magnetic Observatory, was opened by Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor on 10 December 2010.The department said thecentre has been “designed to fulfil international requirements and provide a superior-class facility for space weather forecasts, predictions and warnings”.“This centre will contribute essential information for global space science and technology, as well as forecasts and predictions to protect our growing and future satellite industry,” said Pandor in her speech.The regional space weather warning centre for Africa has been running at the Hermanus Magnetic Observatory for years now, and the new centre will help it expand its services. An area within the existing observatory was renovated to the tune of R1.6-million (US$234 000) to create the dedicated space weather centre.The National Research Foundation (NRF) funded the project, which began in May 2010. “This project will position our country as a leader in space weather for the African continent,” Pandor said.Real-time space weather data will be generated from the centre’s “state-of-the-art” server room on a 24-hour basis. The centre is staffed with three space weather scientists, including head Kobus Olckers.Although space weather does not have a direct link to conditions on earth, it can impact on the functionality of orbiting technology, like satellites, global positioning systems like GPS devices and even mobile phones.According to the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, space weather is caused by conditions on the sun and by solar winds, which can influence the performance and reliability of space-borne and ground-based technological systems. Space weather can endanger human life or health, according to the observatory.“This centre will play a crucial role in the monitoring of conditions over Africa as we approach the next solar maximum,” said the NRF in a statement.During a solar maximum period, the sun’s magnetic field on the solar equator rotates at a slightly faster pace than at the solar poles, resulting in a type of intense storm.The last solar maximum was in 2000 and Nasa scientists predict the next one will happen in 2012.This upcoming burst of solar activity, anticipated to be the greatest since 1958, will most definitely affect mobile phones, GPSs and many other modern technologies on earth, according to Nasa. It will also result in Northern Lights shining at their brightest in 50 years – and they may even be visible from as far south as Rome, Italy.Thanks to the new centre, the Hermanus Magnetic Observatory will, for the first time, be able to continuously monitor space weather data coming from its various stations.The space weather centre was opened a day after the official launch of South African National Space Agency and the National Space Strategy, which is expected to boost the country’s involvement in space activities. However, it doesn’t look like South Africa will send an astronaut to space any time soon.“The opening of the space weather centre is an additional landmark in our attempts to strengthen the space sector,” said Pandor.“We know the strengths of the local space industry. We know that we need to improve our capacity. We want to improve South Africa’s global position in the space sector,” she added.The government’s goal is to establish a fully operational space programme within the next five years.The 12 space weather regional warning centres elsewhere in the world are in the US, China, India, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Belgium, Poland, Russia, Australia and Japan.The Hermanus Magnetic ObservatoryThe 78-year-old observatory has grown significantly over the last decade since the NRF took ownership, with its staff of scientists growing from nine to 40. Its postgraduate programme now has 24 MSc and PhD students.While it used to concentrate on geomagnetic studies alone, it now focuses on space physics as well.Its data is used by global and local institutions such as the International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network, the National Astrophysics and Space Science Programme and Rhodes University in the Eastern Cape.last_img read more

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‘Huge potential’ for SA wine tourism

first_img19 April 2011Wine tourism contributed an estimated R4.3-billion to South Africa’s overall tourism revenue in 2009, and still has huge potential for further growth, says Tourism Minister Marthinus van Schalkwyk.Addressing a stakeholder workshop at the Spier Estate outside Stellenbosch on Monday, Van Schalkwyk said that wine tourism was one of the fastest growing and most lucrative sectors of the global tourism market.“In South Africa, our wine industry plays an important role in terms of its contribution to specifically regional and rural economic growth and job creation,” he said.“In 2009 wine tourism contributed an estimated R4.3-billion to our country’s tourism revenue, and we believe there is still great potential for growth in this regard.”Van Schalkwyk said that, by increasing its revenue from tourism, the South African wine industry could offset international volatility caused by factors such as foreign currency and demand fluctuations.Wine and gourmet tourism could also held increase the geographic spread of tourism in the country by providing additional options for tourists.“Wine tourism is a vital product offering in South Africa’s tourism product as it helps improve the country’s competitiveness against destinations like Brazil, Australia, Kenya and Thailand,” he said.“We believe stakeholder inclusivity and alignment is fundamental to the adoption and implementation of a winning wine tourism strategy.”Sapalast_img read more

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Africa rising

first_imgA giraffe in Nairobi National Park, with Nairobi’s skyline in the background. An MSc student at Kenyatta University works with ICRISAT-Nairobi on the use of molecular markers in agriculture to speed up success in plant breeding programmes. The Katse Dam, a concrete arch dam on the Malibamat’so River in Lesotho, is Africa’s second largest dam. The vibrant city of Maputo, Mozambique’s capital, is regaining its former grandeur.(Images: Wikipedia)MEDIA CONTACTS • Brand South Africa+27 11 483 0122Source: Brand South AfricaAfrica’s time is now. In academic studies, institutional reports, business journals and the mass media a new story about Africa is emerging: one of growth, progress, peace, potential and profitability.Never in the half-century since it won independence from the colonial powers has Africa been in such good shape. Its economy is flourishing. Most countries are at peace.So says a March 2013 Economist special edition on Africa. It goes on:Mobile phones are as ubiquitous as they are in India and, in the worst-affected countries, HIV infections have fallen by up to three-quarters. Life expectancy rose by a tenth in the past decade and foreign direct investment has tripled. Consumer spending will almost double in the next ten years; the number of countries with average incomes above $1 000 per person a year will grow from less than half of Africa’s 55 states to three-quarters.Africans deserve the credit.And yet, despite these and other stories, a stubborn perception gap persists – the 2012 Ernst & Young Attractiveness Survey: Africa goes so far as to call it a perception “chasm”. Tellingly, this gap is between those global companies who do business in Africa, and those who don’t.While foreign direct investment ramps up, Africa still lags in capturing the global imagination. The rupture between stereotype and reality must be mended with new stories about Africa, stories of growth and opportunity, democratic progress, conflict resolution and human development.Africa’s economic performance over the past decade has outstripped any previous period in history. Right now, it’s the fastest growing continent on the planet, with average GDP rising at an impressive 6% and combined GDP set to hit $2.6-trillion by 2020. Foreign direct investment is flooding into areas once seen as hopeless.FDI projects across the continent have surged, up 27% from 2010 and part of a longer term trend that saw such projects grow at a compound rate of almost 20% since 2007, and by 153% in absolute terms since 2002. In money terms, FDI has risen from $15-billion in 2002 to $37-billion in 2006, hitting $46-billion 2012. Matching this pattern, Africa’s economic output has almost tripled since 2003. The International Monetary Fund forecasts that, over the next five years, seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world will be African.Commodities and consumersPart of this growth – but by no means all – has been a surge in commodities. From aluminium to zinc, passing copper, diamonds, oil and platinum on the way, Africa’s wealth of natural resources means commodities contribute a third to GDP growth. This excludes indirect benefits, such as the skills, contacts and capital spread by other countries as their citizens set up operations on the continent.The commodities boom has largely been driven by China, now Africa’s biggest trading partner. African trade with China has risen from $11-billion to $166-billion over the past decade.But as the 2007-2008 financial crisis made clear, Africa’s economy is not all about commodities. While the rest of the world floundered, African economies stood firm – some accelerated – thanks to stable domestic demand.A significant part of the African growth story is about higher domestic consumption – growth is not unbalanced; it is not entirely dependent on resource exports.Unlike the commodities boom of the 1970s, when the wealth was hoovered up by autocratic elites alone, today’s growth is being enjoyed by the people of Africa, with rising incomes driving further growth. In the last 10 years real income per person has increased by more than 30% – as opposed to the previous 20 years, when it shrank by about 10%.Once-scarce consumer goods are everywhere. Africa has three mobile phones for every four people, the same as India. It’s predicted that by 2017 about 30% of households will have a television set, an almost fivefold increase in 10 years. Nigeria produces more films than the US. In opinion polls, almost two-thirds of Africans think this year will be better than last – double the European rate.According to a 2012 report by McKinsey & Company, African households’ rising incomes offer enormous untapped growth opportunities for consumer companies. Startlingly, the report found that urban Africans spend more on clothing and food than their counterparts in the massive economies of Brazil, China and India. More than this, 84% of Africans were “exceptionally optimistic about their economic future”.And it’s not only consumer spending that’s on the rise: human development is, too. Increased revenues have allowed increased spending on education, healthcare and welfare.Across Africa, secondary-school enrolment grew by 48% between 2000 and 2008 after many states expanded education programmes and scrapped school fees. Malaria deaths in some of the hardest-hit countries have fallen by 30% in the past decade, and HIV infections by up to 74%. Broadly speaking, African life expectancy has increased by about 10%, and most countries’ child mortality rates are falling sharply.Democracy and peaceFrom the colonial period through the Cold War and after, violence, warfare, dictatorship and regime instability went together, combining to increase inequality, stunt economic growth, deter investment and cripple education. But the past two decades have seen democracy and peace breaking out across Africa.According to the Polity IV data series from the University of Colorado, which measures global democracy on a scale from -10 (most autocratic) to +10 (most democratic), African governments’ average rating has risen from a low of -5.9 in the mid-1970s to close on +2 in 2010 – an eight-point rise on a 20-point scale.During the Cold War, the US and USSR vied with each other to prop up violent dictators they hoped would protect their interests. As the Berlin Wall fell only three of Africa’s then 53 countries were democracies. Today 25 of of the continent’s 55 countries are largely democratic, with many more beginning to hold what The Economist calls “imperfect but worthwhile” elections – 22 of them last year alone.At the end of the Cold War it was virtually unknown for a ruling African party to be peacefully unseated by elections. But in 1991 Benin did it, and since then peaceful and democratic regime change has happened over 30 times. Today only four of Africa’s 55 countries lack a multiparty constitution, and two of those, Libya and Somalia, are on track to establish one soon.Democracy is good for business, for the stability and efficiency of state institutions, for inoculating against corruption, for developing human capital. On the whole, Africa’s flourishing democracy is improving governance: to get re-elected, politicians must deliver.“Across Africa both voters and leaders are better educated than they were even half a generation ago,” The Economist says. “Many of those in power are the first in their families with a university degree. Standards of political debate have risen thanks to better schools, modern media and the return of diaspora members who bring new ideas with them.”And wars are ending. Countries that once seemed hopeless cases, embroiled in civil and cross-border conflicts that dragged on bloodily for decades, are now peaceful, stable and putting their energies into their economies.After millions of deaths and hundreds of refugees in a civil war that lasted a quarter of a century, Angola has now known peace for over a decade – and is one of the fastest growing economies in the world.The number of armed conflicts in Africa has fallen from over 30 at the end of the Cold War to around a dozen today. Over the same period, the number of successful coups fell by two-thirds.Chad is now in peace – after four civil wars – as are many, many other long- and short-term conflict zones: Ethiopia, Mozambique, Eritrea, Liberia, Rwanda, Burundi, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Kenya … Even Congo, Somalia and Sudan are much less violent than they used to be.Like Angola, Sierra Leone has been at peace for a decade, after an 11-year civil war that killed at least 50 000 people. Today, violence is rare: fewer than a hundred people out of 7-million are murdered in a year – a fifth of the rate in New York.Believe the hypeAs Ernst & Young’s eye-opening African attractiveness survey found, those who do believe in Africa’s future are those who do business here. Those who don’t, don’t.“Sceptics retort that Africa has seen false dawns before,” The Economist writes. “They fear that foreign investors will exploit locals and that the continent will be ‘not lifted but looted’.”But there is no doubt that the fundamentals are in place not only for current growth, but increasing and stabilised prosperity in the future.The Economist:The biggest reason to be hopeful is that it takes time for results from past investment to come through, and many such benefits have yet to materialise. Billions have already been put into roads and schools over the past decade; the tech revolution has only just reached the more remote corners of the continent; plenty of new oilfields and gold mines have been tapped but are not yet producing revenues.In late 2012, the influential Institute for International Finance, after noting high levels of interest in Africa among its members – over 450 of the world’s biggest banks and financial institutions – released its report on sub-Saharan Africa. It had crunched the numbers, looked at real conditions on the ground, and reached a conclusion: Africa’s rising is no false dawn. It’s the real thing.“After emerging Asia, Africa is the fastest-growing region in today’s world,” said George Abed, head of the institute’s Africa and Middle East division.“Many countries on the African continent have achieved great progress in stabilizing their economies and consolidating their rates of growth. What is remarkable about this outcome is that it has been achieved during a period of unprecedented global financial turbulence. There are challenges ahead for Africa, but the trend of solid growth of the past decade looks sustainable over the medium term.”last_img read more

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