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The sedimentary legacy of a palaeo-ice stream on the shelf of the southern Bellingshausen Sea: Clues to West Antarctic glacial history during the Late Quaternary

first_imgA major trough (“Belgica Trough”) eroded by a palaeo-ice stream crosses the continental shelf of the southern Bellingshausen Sea (West Antarctica) and is associated with a trough mouth fan (“Belgica TMF”) on the adjacent continental slope. Previous marine geophysical and geological studies investigated the bathymetry and geomorphology of Belgica Trough and Belgica TMF, erosional and depositional processes associated with bedform formation, and the temporal and spatial changes in clay mineral provenance of subglacial and glaciomarine sediments. Here, we present multi-proxy data from sediment cores recovered from the shelf and uppermost slope in the southern Bellingshausen Sea and reconstruct the ice-sheet history since the last glacial maximum (LGM) in this poorly studied area of West Antarctica. We combined new data (physical properties, sedimentary structures, geochemical and grain-size data) with published data (shear strength, clay mineral assemblages) to refine a previous facies classification for the sediments. The multi-proxy approach allowed us to distinguish four main facies types and to assign them to the following depositional settings: 1) subglacial, 2) proximal grounding-line, 3) distal sub-ice shelf/sub-sea ice, and 4) seasonal open-marine. In the seasonal open-marine fades we found evidence for episodic current-induced winnowing of near-seabed sediments on the middle to outer shelf and at the uppermost slope during the late Holocene. In addition, we obtained data on excess Pb-210 activity at three core sites and 44 AMS C-14 dates from the acid-insoluble fraction of organic matter (AIO) and calcareous (micro-) fossils, respectively, at 12 sites. These chronological data enabled us to reconstruct, for the first time, the timing of the last advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet (APIS) in the southern Bellingshausen Sea. We used the down-core variability in sediment provenance inferred from clay mineral changes to identify the most reliable AIO C-14 ages for ice-sheet retreat. The palaeo-ice stream advanced through Belgica Trough after similar to 36.0 corrected C-14 ka before present (B.P.). It retreated from the outer shelf at similar to 25.5 ka B.P, the middle shelf at similar to 19.8 ka B.P., the inner shelf in Eltanin Bay at similar to 12.3 ka B.P., and the inner shelf in Ronne Entrance at similar to 6.3 ka B.P. The retreat of the WAIS and APIS occurred slowly and stepwise, and may still be in progress. This dynamical ice-sheet behaviour has to be taken into account for the interpretation of recent and the prediction of future mass-balance changes in the study area. The glacial history of the southern Bellingshausen Sea is unique when compared to other regions in West Antarctica, but some open questions regarding its chronology need to be addressed by future work. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Morris scores 8th goal, Sounders topple Real Salt Lake 2-1

first_img Tags: Jordan Morris/MLS/Real Salt Lake/Seattle Sounders FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSEATTLE (AP) — Jordan Morris scored his eighth goal of the season midway through the first half, Yeimar Gómez Andrade added a goal on a header early in the second half, and the Seattle Sounders beat Real Salt Lake 2-1.Seattle padded its lead on top of the Western Conference with its third straight win and fifth in the last six matches.Real Salt Lake lost its second straight match and dropped into ninth place in the Western Conference after Houston’s win over FC Dallas.Seattle coach Brian Schmetzer coached his 400th match with the franchise at the various levels the Sounders have played in their history. Written by Associated Press October 7, 2020 /Sports News – Local Morris scores 8th goal, Sounders topple Real Salt Lake 2-1last_img read more

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USA: GDBIW Completes Negotiations for Construction of Two Ships

first_img View post tag: construction August 5, 2011 View post tag: completes Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: GDBIW Completes Negotiations for Construction of Two Ships View post tag: usa View post tag: two View post tag: Navy View post tag: Naval USA: GDBIW Completes Negotiations for Construction of Two Ships View post tag: News by topic View post tag: negotiations View post tag: ships U.S. Sen. Susan Collins and about 100 workers on Wednesday celebrated the completion of negotiations for construction of two ships that shou…(pressherald)[mappress]Source: pressherald, August 5, 2011; View post tag: GDBIW Share this articlelast_img read more

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Reduction responsibility

first_imgFor those who do qualify, it’s important to remember that reductions in emissions from gas count equally when it comes to submitting the carbon return, which decides the level of rebate or penalty a firm faces under the scheme. By gaining a much deeper appreciation of the base load and volatility of their gas consumption, bakeries are better equipped to select the best contract. This minimises the risk of consuming too much or too little gas and the resultant costs and penalties this can cause.For example, Shell Gas Direct’s Automated Meter Reading (AMR), fitted to an existing gas meter, communicates consumption data back via mobile technology for display on a secure website. This allows the customer to view and analyse the energy profile of their processes and, as a result, monitor efficiency.”AMR is also accepted by the scheme as evidence of ’early action’ proactive measures to reduce emissions ahead of the scheme’s full adoption,” says Shell’s Mike Hogg. “This will be one of three components counting towards a company’s league table position. Companies have until April 2011, the end of the CRC’s first year, to maximise this early action rating by installing technologies such as AMR.”The economic incentive to reduce emissions will increase as the cost of energy rises, which the current consensus predicts it will. Baked goods manufacturers should see the CRC as an important step-change in how they manage energy and, as such, engage positively and early with its requirements and aims.”Adopting energy-efficient practices is an excellent chance to not only mitigate the environmental impact of business but also build encouraging frameworks to better manage energy usage, he says. Bakeries must also seize the opportunity to understand their energy demand and protect their bottom line.In its statement, Allied says: “When planning or undertaking capital products or purchasing new equipment in both manufacturing and supply chain, environmental factors, such as energy efficiency, play a key role in our decision-making processes.”Every company will have to make its own assessment, balancing energy costs and payments under the CRC or CCL schemes against capital and other investment costs with longer-term benefits. But how much difference this will all make to retailers and consumers remains unclear. Allied says: “There is no compelling evidence yet that consumers are making active choices between brands based on their carbon footprint.” But it adds: “We believe our customers are looking to work with suppliers who take their environmental impact seriously.”One way or another, it seems, that seriousness is being scrutinised ever more closely. Four steps bakers should take to prepare for the CRC Finsbury Food group likens the CRC to the Producer Responsibility Obligations for packaging, whereby companies are required to pay for recovering and recycling the packaging they use. “The CRC is similar, but with the difference that if you can demonstrate year-on-year reductions in energy consumed, you’re rewarded for it,” says Finlay.Those rewards work on two levels. Firstly, those demonstrating improved energy efficiency are eligible for bonus payments. Secondly, the annually-published league table is designed to be a prime benchmark for assessing sustainability. The EA’s Grayling says: “The league table is a very public judgement on how seriously you take your environmental responsibilities. If organisations don’t take up the challenge, there’s a risk to their reputation and their pockets.”Taking up that challenge can take many different forms. Says Diston-Hunter: “There are probably several hundred initiatives that a bakery could put in place to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions.” These range from behavioural changes in operating equipment to equipment modifications and alternative fuels. As he points out: “There is often no correlation between the size of the investment and the size of return.” The Carbon Trust is currently working with the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and the bakery sector to investigate making step-change reductions in CO2 emissions from the baking process, by accelerating innovation in process control, the uptake of low carbon technologies and product strategies. Companies involved in the work include Allied Bakeries, Jacksons and Irwins. Current work is focused on the baking process by building a detailed picture of process energy use. This is based on information from process operators, equipment manufacturers and sub-meter data from equipment in use at representative sites. A feedback session looking at the findings of the investigations will take place in early June.”In other similar industry sectors, we have worked with to date, we have identified opportunities that could save an average of 28% annual CO2 emissions per sector,” says a spokesperson for the FDF. “Once this first stage of work is complete, we will aim to build a business case for the baking sector to implement the carbon saving opportunities identified, by undertaking focused research or demonstration projects.”Companies involved in bakery, equipment suppliers, technology developers and other stakeholders are all invited to propose projects that could be adopted across the sector. Contact The Carbon Trust on [email protected] Who is affected – and how? Bakers leading the agenda Initial assessments for the CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme were carried out during 2008. Any business then using at least one half-hourly electricity meter (HHM) must register under the CRC with the Environment Agency (EA) by 30 September 2010. Organisations should already have been informed about this during 2009. Of those companies, any that consumed at least 6,000 MW hours through all their HHMs during 2008 (equivalent to roughly £500,000 worth of power) and not already part of a formal emissions reduction scheme, will need to participate. This involves monitoring energy consumption and purchasing carbon allowances. Those companies demonstrating the greatest reductions in energy consumption will receive “financial and reputational rewards”, says the EA, including pride of place in an annual league table of CRC performance. It says that its communications campaign will continue up to the end of the registration period, and will include a series of ’How to register’ surgeries. l The EA’s CRC helpdesk can be contacted at [email protected] Or go to: www.environment-agency.gov.uk/crc Gas emissions l Proactively verify whether your company qualifies. Penalties for non-compliance can be severe, so it’s worth being prepared for the timetable of registration and reportingl Check whether correspondence and information about the CRC is going to the right people in your companyl Consider what information you need from your energy supplier and which format it should be presented in l Use the CRC as an opportunity to secure support within your company for environmental improvements Rewards for reduction The environment may have been a notable absentee from the General Election campaign, but make no mistake it has not gone away. Companies picking their way through the government’s Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) know this only too well. This is yet another Government-sponsored initiative, along with the Climate Change Levy (CCL), attempting to monitor and reduce CO2 emissions and more specifically energy consumption. Since launch, the CRC has been given the slightly longer, but more explanatory, name of the CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme (CRC EES).The Environment Agency (EA), which is responsible for the scheme, tries to be reassuring about its implications. Says head of climate change and sustainable development Tony Grayling: “Carbon reduction doesn’t need to be complicated or expensive. There are simple and inexpensive steps every organisation can take to cut their energy consumption.”Since last year, the EA has been contacting operations where at least some electricity was supplied on half-hourly metering (HHM) at any time during 2008. Even where a company or plant has subsequently moved away from HHM, it will still need to submit an information disclosure.That is no mean feat. Critically, much hinges on how an organisation’s extent is defined, according to the energyteam consultancy. “This includes applying the Companies Act tests to ascertain how undertakings such as companies, partnerships and unincorporated associations must be grouped together,” says head of social responsibility Stuart Diston-Hunter. Failure to complete the information disclosure stage can incur fines of £500 per meter, he adds.The EA helpfully produced “more than a dozen guides” to the information disclosure part of the process, says energyteam. “But the guides are typically 40 to 50 pages long, and include a lot of detail and terminology,” Diston-Hunter adds.Finsbury Food Group, on the other hand, says its own advisers have like the EA downplayed the complexity of the CRC. Says group buyer David Finlay: “We’ve been led to believe it’s fairly straightforward.” The group is in the early stages of compiling information for the EA. But it does not predict that the details of group structure will be over-complicated. “Otherwise, it’s a matter of totalling up energy usage for the period in question.”Finsbury says it is likely to be over the 6,000 MWh threshold for CRC registration and reporting. “But as we understand it, the trading in carbon credits will not need to happen, because we are already paying the Climate Change Levy,” says Finlay. In fact, like others, Finsbury is eligible for an 80% discount on the levy.A spokeswoman for the EA confirms: “The aim of the CRC is to capture organisations that are not already working on emis-sions reduction under the CCL or other heavy-duty regulation.” She stresses that companies which are unsure about whether the CRC relates to them should consult the EA website (see box-out, right).Like Finsbury, Allied Bakeries says it is already part of the Food and Drink Federation’s voluntary CCL agreement. In a statement, it explains: “We are currently working with internal experts to assess our obligations under the CRC.” Last year, Allied’s Kingsmill became the first bread brand permitted to use the Carbon Reduction label on three of its products.So what about those needing to participate fully in the CRC scheme? “They will need to identify their organisational structure, register, produce a footprint report for the year to 31 March 2011, together with annual reports and an evidence pack proving how data was sourced and calculations were made,” says Diston-Hunter at energyteam.Registration and administration costs will be “a few thousand pounds a year”, he says. But that is clearly not the whole story. “Professional fees and internal administration costs mean that many participants should budget considerably more to ensure compliance,” he adds. Carbon allowance costs are fixed at a minimum of £12/tonne of CO2 until 2013. Around 20% of participants will be audited to ensure that figures are valid, says energyteam.last_img read more

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State of Indiana now on Chicago’s travel quarantine list

first_img Twitter State of Indiana now on Chicago’s travel quarantine list Pinterest Twitter (“Approaching Chicago, Illinois, Kennedy Expressway, I-90 and I-94 Eastbound” by Ken Lund, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic ) The City of Chicago has added Indiana to its travel order.The mandate requires anyone who is arriving in Chicago from Indiana to self-isolate for 14 days when they arrive in the Windy City.Essential workers are exempt if they must travel for work. Commuting students, people leaving home for medical treatment, or parental shared custody reasons are also exempt.People caught violating the quarantine order can face fines of $100-$500 per day, up to $7000.Indiana has now seen more than 1500 daily cases of COVID-19 for five days in a row.Chicago Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady says Indiana’s loosening of restrictions factored into the decision to put the state on the travel order list.She says she will reconsider the mandate once Indiana’s coronavirus cases are under better control. WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Google+ By Jon Zimney – October 13, 2020 2 927 CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Previous articleWoman, 47, found dead on Webster Street in South Bend victim of a homicideNext articleSuspect killed, officer and K9 shot as manhunt in South Bend comes to an end Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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News story: Gemalto awarded the new passport contract

first_img I am delighted that we have awarded the contract to design and produce the new blue passport. I look forward to working with Gemalto to continue to deliver a world-class service to British nationals around the world, and keep the UK passport as a global leader of document security. The new blue passport will be delivered under this contract and it will be the world’s first carbon neutral passport. It will include a complete redesign of the inside pages that will incorporate the latest developments in secure technologies to keep ahead of forgers and fakers.The 11.5 year contract has been awarded to Gemalto after a rigorous, fair and open competition. With a contract value of approximately £260 million this will deliver significant savings compared to the £400 million contract awarded in 2009, and provide value for money to the taxpayer.Mark Thomson, Director General for HM Passport Office, said: This passport contract will further extend Gemalto’s presence in the UK, where it has operated for the last 25 years, and will add approximately 70 jobs to its existing British workforce.They are an experienced and trusted company and work with over 40 countries around the world on their passport production. They already work with the UK government in a number of areas including the production of UK driving licenses, UK biometric residence permit cards and on e-gates at the border.HM Passport Office would like to take the opportunity to thank all the bidders for their efforts throughout the procurement process, in particular to De La Rue with whom we look forward to continuing to work closely and successfully with for the remainder of the current contract.last_img read more

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When It Comes to Fighting Ocean-Bound Waste, Collaboration Is Key

first_imgIn the UK right now, there is a huge spotlight on the crisis being created in our seas by plastic waste. The reality of the situation is scary – and hard to ignore. Every single year, 8 million metric tons of plastic enter our seas, endangering marine life and polluting our waters. And it’s not just marine life being affected. With the vast majority of plastic pieces in the ocean less than 5mm in size, these are often eaten by fish, meaning anyone who consumes an “average amount” of seafood ingests approximately 11,000 plastic particles a year – a scary thought when you consider that over exposure to plastic chemicals can lead to certain forms of cancer, immune disorders and obesity.Thanks to programs like the BBC’s Blue Planet II and campaigns like Sky Ocean Rescue, we are all now aware of the scale of the problem, but awareness is only part of the equation. We also need to take action. At Dell, we were first made aware of this issue in 2016 through our relationship with actor and activist Adrian Grenier and his work with the Lonely Whale Foundation. This led to us looking for ways to address the ocean plastics challenges within our business, and packaging was a natural place to start. So, following an initial feasibility study, we launched a pilot project in early 2017 working with groups from coastal areas around the world to collect plastics from waterways, beaches, shorelines and areas near the coasts. We now use this plastic waste to create packaging trays for our XPS 13 2-in-1 and more recently, our XPS 15 2-in-1 laptops. We anticipate that this pilot will keep 16,000 pounds of plastics out of oceans initially, and in support of UN SDG Goal 14, we are committed to increase annual usage of ocean-bound plastic 10x by 2025.And while we were proud of this meaningful contribution to tackle the issue, we quickly identified a critical barrier to successfully scaling their efforts: absence of an operational and commercially viable ocean-bound plastic supply chain. So, along with the Lonely Whale Foundation, with support from UN Environment, we set out to convene a group of companies to join forces to create an open-source initiative to develop the first-ever commercial-scale ocean-bound plastics and nylon supply chain. Called NextWave, founding members including Dell, General Motors, Trek Bicycle, Herman Miller, Interface, Van de Sant, Humanscale and Bureo, will share responsibility in development of a sustainable model that reduces ocean-bound plastic pollution at scale, while creating an economic and social benefit for multiple stakeholders. We think the work of this group will divert more than 3 million pounds of plastics from entering the ocean within five years, the equivalent to keeping 66 million water bottles from washing out to sea.https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=EQ5Sh5HQV8wWe believe collaboration is really the only way we’ll address many of the challenges facing our world today, which is why I was truly honoured to be asked to participate in a recent high-level meeting with The Prince of Wales’s International Sustainability Unit (ISU) on ‘Keeping Plastics and Their Value in the Economy and Out of the Ocean.’ Attended by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, C.E.Os and senior executives from a range of organisations including Government, private sector and N.G.Os working to apply principles of circular economy to the current plastic value chain, it was a privilege to represent Dell and the work we are doing, and have an opportunity to discuss best practices with others pursuing the same goals.LONDON – UK – 31st Jan 2018. HRH The Prince of Wales, as Patron, hosts a reception and meeting of the ISU plastics forum at 11 Carlton House Terrace in London Photograph by Ian JonesReflecting on this meeting, what really struck me was the realisation that even three years ago, sustainability was typically limited to a subject matter expert within an organisation, whereas now, it is a critical part of business strategy and every single CEO and senior executive at the table was able to speak with authority on the role their company wants to play in finding solutions to environmental issues. I know in my role as general manager for Dell EMC in the UK and Ireland, I have conversations with customers every single day about how we are creating a more sustainable business for our company and the world around us, and how important it is for them to not only work with companies who are acting responsible, but also learn from us how they can adopt similar practices. It really does demonstrate the huge opportunities that collaboration presents for the corporate world to play a meaningful and measurable positive impact for the future – and I’m very proud to be a part of it.If your company is interested in getting involved, you can apply or find out more at https://www.nextwaveplastics.org/apply/last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s course aims to introduce students to shared experiences of pilgrimages

first_imgThe collaboration of a student and professor at Saint Mary’s has resulted in a new spring semester course. Senior Annie Maguire, with the help of professor of philosophy Patty Sayre, has developed a philosophy course called “The Camino.” The course material for The Camino will focus on the subject of pilgrimage.The course is worth one academic credit and is in anticipation of students completing a pilgrimage at some point in the future.“[The course was developed with] a syllabus that would allow students to enroll in a class one for one credit to really explore the ideas and themes around pilgrimage and prepare students for that experience,” Maguire said.The idea for this preparatory course for pilgrimages came about from Maguire’s personal experience when she walked the Camino de Santiago — “The Way of St. James” — in southern France and northern Spain at the end of her semester abroad in Seville. Maguire embarked on a three-week journey beginning in Leon, France, to Santiago, Spain.“Originally, the pilgrimage route was created as a way for people to kind of show their love for St. James,” she said. “‘Santiago’ means St. James, and ending in the city of Santiago is where it is said the remains of St. James are.”The Camino de Santiago involves intense backpacking along a path that would take around 35 days to walk in full. Along the path pilgrims would stay at hostels all through the countryside in Spain which facilitates the community experience throughout the journey, as Maguire described.“That’s something that I can take with me forever — the relationships,” she said. “Having this experience helped me learn about other people’s stories, the importance of sharing your stories, and kind of just widening my worldview. … I wanted to create something where other students could engage in.”Though Maguire will incorporate her experience walking The Camino, she will teach the course with the expectation that students will complete their own pilgrimages over their own time.“The preparation we will do throughout the course of the semester for students will be more similar to what I experienced just because I want to help and give as many ways as I can to contribute to this class,” she said. “But students are obviously invited to take any note that they’d like to explore the different options and whatever works for them and their schedules. They could do so at the end of the semester, or maybe like a year down the road, or maybe, you know, far out in advance. But I think that freedom is really important because I along the way, I met a lot of students who were doing this through a school group or with a group of people, and that is a very different experience. … I think that’s the benefit of the structure of our course that we’re creating.”With Sayre’s experience in her previous course, Philosophy of Walking, she had the ability to work with Maguire to create this new course focused on pilgrimage. Pilgrimages, Sayre explained, unfold over the course of several stages.“The idea is that the various phases of getting ready for the pilgrimage, going on the pilgrimage, coming back from the pilgrimage,” she said. “We’ll look at pilgrimage narratives from major pilgrimages routes.”In addition to the course readings about pilgrimage as mental preparation, students will also take a walk every Monday from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. to physically prepare for the pilgrimage experience.“I think it honestly gave me so many other life lessons that I carry with me now, like the physical act of walking, you feel all of the items to your name on your back as you carry them along the way,” Maguire said. “That’s also a great metaphor for what we carry with us in our life. … That I learned through this physical experience, but also spiritual and emotional experience as well.”The Camino course not only prepares students discerning a pilgrimage in their lives but allows for the freedom to travel when they choose to.“It’s going to prepare one for a major pilgrimage,” Sayre said. “One of the things that might happen is that … if it is your time, you might think meet someone else in the class whose time it is. And then if you wanted to travel together, you’d have that automatic connection.”Maguire encourages students to take this course as it can help all students achieve their purpose for taking a pilgrimage.“Maybe they want to do a little soul searching, maybe they just want to break in their schedule in their busy lives, maybe they’re really interested in backpacking, so it draws a whole diverse group of people together on this experience that is very much communal and shared and life changing,” Maguire said.Sayre said she is excited to share her love of walking and to encourage students to use walking and pilgrimage as a transformative experience for their daily lives. She also said she wants to learn more about the pilgrimage experience.“I’m looking forward to just learning more about pilgrimages,” she said. “I really desperately do want to do the Camino someday. … When my time comes, I’d like to be ready.”Maguire said she is looking forward to continuing the exploration of her previous experience on the Camino and to share the fruits of that experience with her peers.“I’m very excited to … hear from other students,” Maguire said. “I feel like that is really valuable perspective because taking the Camino is all about changing perspective in your life. I think reading and learning about the experiences of others will help me even as I still process my own experience, understand things.”Tags: El Camino, Pilgrimage, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Former Scott Credit Union manager pleads guilty to $12 million fraud

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr During a 30-minute hearing in an Illinois federal courtroom Thursday, a former business relationship manager for the $1 billion Scott Credit Union pleaded guilty to a fraudulent loan scheme of more than $12 million.Theodore J. Longust, 50, formerly of Columbia, Ill., admitted to financial institution fraud, misapplication of funds, money laundering and filing a false report. continue reading »last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Health Department gives update on coronavirus (May 10)

first_imgHARRISBURG, Pa (WBNG) — The Pennsylvania Health Department gave a statewide update regarding the coronavirus on Sunday. The health department says most of the hospitalized individuals are aged 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in individuals 65 or older. They also say there are 19 additional deaths, bringing the total to 3,707. Pennsylvania residents can sign up for AlertPA, which is a notification system for health, weather, and coronavirus updates. Residents can sign up online at this link. For statewide updates on the coronavirus, visit pa.gov. The state health department reports 227,772 individuals who have tested negative to date. They have provided a breakdown of the patients who have tested positive. The breakdown is as follows: Additionally, the health department reports approximately 3,759 cases among health care workers.  The health department has also provided an update on nursing and personal care homes. They say there are 11,645 cases among residents and 1,645 among employees. That makes a total of 13,290 positive cases at 539 different facilities. The health department also says that out of the statewide total deaths, 2,529 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care homes. For more coronavirus coverage, click here. Nearly 1% are aged 0-4Nearly 1% are aged 5-121% are aged 13-18Nearly 6% are aged 19-24Nearly 37% are aged 25-49 26% are aged 50-6428% are aged 65 or older The health department reports an additional 1,295 individuals who tested positive for the virus. That brings the statewide total to 56,611. last_img read more

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