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Three agents investigated after being reported over misleading claims

first_imgClaims made in three different estate agents’ leaflets and circulars distributed in Scotland, Sheffield and Somerset have been challenged by members of the public for being misleading and reported to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA).After being approached by the watchdog the agents have promised not to repeat the claims made in the leaflets, which included competitor comparisons, inaccurate information about a portal listing and claims about ‘prices achieved’.Happy Sales & Lettings, which is based in Sheffield, distributed a leaflet that listed a number of competitors’ sold and unsold properties in a table format.One of the competitors, local firm Crucible Sales & Lettings, challenged whether the information in the leaflet was both misleading and the information verifiable.Happy Sales & Lettings said the leaflet was no longer being distributed, and promised to ensure future competitor comparison information was clearly signposted in future ads.Lewis Gray was reported to the ASA because the company claimed in a circular that it listed properties on Zoopla when it did not, and has now removed references to the portal in its print and online material.And Scottish RE/MAX franchisee John Slaven had his circular challenged after a member of the public spotted his claim within it that he would “get you the highest possible price”. They challenged whether it was misleading and could be substantiated. The agent gave assurances that the claim would not be used again, the ASA says.Lewis Gray Happy Sales and Lettings RE/MAX advertising standards authority September 20, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Three agents investigated after being reported over misleading claims previous nextAgencies & PeopleThree agents investigated after being reported over misleading claimsAdvertising watchdog examines complaints by public and competitors over information within three different leaflets and circulars.Nigel Lewis20th September 20170781 Viewslast_img read more

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Movestreets ‘Tinder’ app launches

first_imgHome » News » Movestreets ‘Tinder’ app launches previous nextProptechMovestreets ‘Tinder’ app launchesThe Negotiator10th September 20200310 Views One of the co-founders of a famous fashion label has launched an app-based property portal that promises to change house hunting in the same way his clothing company has changed the rag trade.Manchester entrepreneur Adam Kamani, who is the son of BooHoo.com founder Mahmud Kamani but who founded his own fashion label PrettyLittleThings. com with his brother Umar, has also become a significant commercial and residential developer in both the UK and New York in recent years.He has now launched MoveStreets, which is a free smartphone property search app with many similarities to Tinder.Users swipe right and left to identify the sales or rental homes they like close within a chosen area.The app, which is available on Google Play and the Apple App Store, has considerable money behind it – as the Kamani family are collectively said to be worth over £1 billion.Estate agents are being offered free listings on the property portal for the first 12 months. “Our deep understanding of data, marketing and consumer needs has been instrumental in providing a new property portal to support both the customer and the agency,” says Adam Kamani. Movestreets is being launched in Manchester initially but Kamani says he has plans to go national next year.video.movestreets.comfree smartphone property search app property search app MoveStreets adam kamani app September 10, 2020Jenny van BredaWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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USS Bonhomme Richard Remembers September 11

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USS Bonhomme Richard Remembers September 11 Sailors aboard USS Bonhomme Richard marked the 10th anniversary of 9/11 prior to pulling in from a brief underway period Sept. 8. “It’s important to remember these events, so we don’t forget our history,” said Capt. Jonathan Harnden commanding officer of USS Bonhomme Richard while addressing the crew. “When I was young, it was ‘where were you when JFK was shot,’ and today, it’s where were you on 9/11.”Lt. Jason DiPinto, ship’s chaplain, organized the ceremony explaining it was something he thought needed to be done for the crew.“I think we all have something to offer when remembering that day. It’s important to incorporate what we do as Sailors, and why we do it, into the remembrance and healing process,” he said.The brief ceremony consisted of a slide show depicting the events of that day and a few remarks by the commanding officer, followed by a reading of the events of that Tuesday morning and moment of silence commemorating the victims.Nearly all of Bonhomme Richard’s 900-plus crewmembers attended the ceremony.[mappress]Source: navy, September 12, 2011; Training & Education USS Bonhomme Richard Remembers September 11center_img September 12, 2011 Share this articlelast_img read more

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Adjunct Faculty, College of Health Sciences

first_imgQualifications of clinical instructors teaching both lower andupper level courses leading to an associate or bachelor’s degreerequires a bachelor’s degree. Clinical instructors in technicalareas such as practical nursing are required to have a minimum ofan associate degree and related work experience. Course instructorsteaching in other areas must hold a degree above the area beingtaught in the discipline or related field. Other job-relatededucation and/or experience may be substituted for part of theserequirements. Background Check / Pre-Employment Screening Special Instructions to Applicants * Did you complete the Employment History section of theapplication?YesNo To perform the job successfully, the following competencies arerequired for the essential functions of this position:• Current knowledge of the relevant discipline.• Good organizational skills and timeliness in responding tostudent inquiries.• Ability to respond to needs of learners from a variety ofeducational backgrounds in a multicultural environment.• Ability to deliver course outcomes and content through a varietyof teaching/learning styles.• Ability to use technology effectively in teaching.• Ability to communicate effectively both orally and inwriting.• Ability to establish and maintain effective interpersonalrelationships with students and colleagues. Special Job Dimensions Open Until FilledYes Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsResumeUnofficial College TranscriptsCover LetterOptional DocumentsProof of Veteran StatusAdditional DocumentUnofficial College Transcripts – Additional 1Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Posting NumberF00090P Work Schedule Quick Link for Positionhttps://jobs.uafs.edu/postings/1482 About the College / Department Work performed primarily in a hospital/clinic facility, campus lab,classroom or online setting. While performing the duties of thisjob, the employee regularly exhibits digital dexterity whenentering data into computer. Required abilities include walking,standing for up to 12 hours in the clinical setting. Visual demandsinclude close, relatively detailed vision when focusing on skillsand a computer screen. Employee occasionally lifts items up to 50pounds. Preferred Qualifications Posting Details DepartmentAdjunct – College of Health Sciences EEO Statement Prior teaching experience. • Teach assigned course as specified in the course schedule andcourse letter of assignment.• Evaluate and select texts and instructional materials; preparecourse materials and lesson plans.• Provide students with approved syllabus that includes courseobjectives and learning outcomes, teaching methodology, attendancepolicies, assignments, and evaluation criteria.• Deliver course content using a variety of teaching styles.• Observe and evaluate student performance in meeting courseobjectives and learning outcomes through assignments, projects, anddiscussion; provide feedback in a timely manner regarding studentprogress.• Be available for student consultation through office hours orscheduled appointments.• Maintain records of enrollment, attendance, assessments, andgrades; submit rosters and grades by University deadlines.• Encourage students to submit course evaluations, review courseevaluations, and use feedback to improve course delivery.• Revise and update course content as needed.• Attend orientation sessions to become familiar with theUniversity’s mission, teaching philosophy, policies and procedures,and the learning management system.• Meet with supervisor to discuss all aspects of the courseincluding student progress and curriculum development.• Responsible for maintaining a positive work atmosphere by actingand communicating in a manner to foster teamwork and by providingleadership to subordinates. Requires consistent on-timeattendance.• Other duties as assigned. Minimum Qualifications Does this position require a background check?Criminal Background Check, Motor Vehicle Registry (MVR) Check,and Drug Screening. Position requires employee complete ArkansasMandated Reporter training prior to employment. Close Date This is a pool position. Applicants will be contacted as positionsbecome available. Teach in one of the following subject areas as assigned: DentalHygiene, Radiography, Surgical Technology, First Aid, MedicalTerminology, Emergency Medical Technology, Certified NursingAssistant ( CNA ), Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers,Pathophysiology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, Practical Nursing, BSNNursing, Medical Surgical, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Critical Care,Mental Health, Community, and Masters in Healthcare Administration.The position reports to the program director/dean who assignsresponsibilities regarding student needs and course outcomes. Thisis a pool position. Applicants will be contacted as positionsbecome available. Benefits Working TitleAdjunct Faculty, College of Health Sciences For more than 6,000 students each semester, the University ofArkansas – Fort Smith offers a dynamic and diverse learningcommunity with a student-centered approach focused on the successof the individual. Small class sizes combine with innovative,hands-on learning and research experiences alongside expert facultyto ensure students receive a future-focused education at the mostaffordable tuition rate in the state. The university has undergonesignificant changes since its founding in 1928 and now offers 51bachelor’s and associate degrees, two master’s degrees, and 36certificate programs, all aimed at preparing students for successin the global workforce. UAFS is one of 21 academic institutionsand affiliates governed by the University of Arkansas System.The second-largest city in the state, Fort Smith is located on theArkansas-Oklahoma border in the heart of the Arkansas River Valley.Established in 1817 as a frontier military post, Fort Smith is nowa vibrant and growing city featuring a variety of culturalactivities and entertainment options, including a thriving downtownarts and entertainment district. Outdoors enthusiasts willappreciate the Natural State’s plentiful trails, mountains,forests, parks, and waterways, both within city limits andthroughout the surrounding area. The city is also within easydriving distance of Tulsa, Kansas City, Dallas, Oklahoma City,Little Rock, and Memphis.The UAFS campus is comprised of 77 buildings and facilities locatedon 170 beautifully manicured acres and crowned with the Donald W.Reynolds Campus Plaza, Tower, and Campus Green. Students who chooseto live on campus may do so in one of two residence hall complexes,complete with a full-service dining center, or the on-campusapartment complex for married students and upperclassmen. Campusinvolvement is encouraged by participation in more than 100registered student organizations, which includes academicsocieties, a dynamic Greek life system, intramural sports, andcultural/special interest groups. The UAFS Lions compete in NCAADivision II Lonestar Conference in men’s baseball, women’svolleyball, and men’s and women’s basketball, golf, cross country,and tennis. Position Summary Open Date License(s)/Certifications Summary of Job Duties * Please list the subject(s) you are interested in teaching:Dental Hygiene, Radiography, Surgical Technology, First Aid,Medical Terminology, Emergency Medical Technology, CertifiedNursing Assistant (CNA), Basic Life Support for HealthcareProviders, Pathophysiology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, PracticalNursing, BSN Nursing, Medical Surgical, Obstetrics, Pediatrics,Critical Care, Mental Health, Community, and Master’s in HealthcareAdministration.(Open Ended Question)* Please list your availability to teach: Day, Evening, and/orWeekend.(Open Ended Question)* Do you understand that failure to complete the EmploymentHistory section of the application will result in automaticelimination?YesNo * Did you upload your unofficial transcript(s)?YesNo SalaryVaries About the University The University of Arkansas – Fort Smith is an equal opportunity,affirmative action institution, dedicated to attracting andsupporting diverse student, faculty, and staff populations. TheUniversity welcomes applications without regard to race, religion,color, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexualorientation), parental status, national origin, age, disability,family medical history or genetic information, politicalaffiliation, military service, or other non-merit based factors.Persons must have proof of legal authority to work in the UnitedStates on the first day of employment. All applicant information issubject to public disclosure under the Arkansas Freedom ofInformation Act.UA Fort Smith provides equal employment, admission, and educationalopportunities without regard to race, color, gender, age, nationalorigin, religion, disability, veterans’ status, sexual orientation,or gender identify. The University abides by all applicableemployment laws.As an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, the Universityis committed to provide equal employment opportunities for allapplicants and employees with regard to recruitment, hiring,transfer, promotion, compensation, training, fringe benefits andall other aspects of employment. This position may be subject to a pre-employment criminalbackground check, sex offender registry check, financial historybackground check, and/or drug screening. A criminal conviction orarrest pending adjudication and/or adverse financial history aloneshall not disqualify an applicant in the absence of a relationshipto the requirements of the position. Background checks and drugscreening information will be used in a confidential, non-discriminatory manner consistent with state and federal law. Position Number20-13-P001 Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities * Do you understand that failure to upload your unofficialtranscript(s) may result in an incomplete application packet?YesNo If yes, please describe.(Open Ended Question)* How did you learn of this employment opportunity?(Open Ended Question) * Have you ever been fired or asked to resign from a job?YesNo Anticipated start datelast_img read more

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OUSU finances in crisis after new plans abandoned

first_imgAsked to reflect on the future of the model, Secretary to the JCCSM, Gary Crocker, refused to comment until a formal statement from the EBC had been released.“Once comments have been received from the EBC and any other consultative bodies the report will be reviewed and further consultation will take place,” he said.“Until the consultation and review process is complete it would be unwise to speculate about future funding options and the finances at OUSU.”OUSU President Lewis Iwu added that the JCCSM had taken great care to absorb feedback from students throughout the process.“Consultation is important and that is why I have had several meetings with common room representatives to get constructive feedback,” he said.The row over funding comes at an increasingly uncertain time for the Students’ Union, which is also facing a dramatic reorganisation to comply with the 2006 Charities Act – which comes into effect later this year.Jason Keen, JCR President of St John’s College, said, “How this funding issue is resolved will be fundamental to the future of OUSU.“We really are at a crossroads at the moment in terms of what we want our students union be, what it should do and how we should pay for it.”He added that many of his fellow JCR and MCR colleagues were worried that they would end up having to foot the bill for the suggested contribution from colleges.“The major concern at the moment is that this additional college rate would be passed straight on to common rooms, which could prompt a wave of disaffiliations,” he said.The current proposed changes have been strongly criticised, with many fearing it could result in an essential stealth tax on students.Among its fiercest critics is Ben Britton, MCR co-President of St Catherine’s College, who has created his own proposal as an alternative funding model.“I, and several others, am pleased that JCCSM WG proposal has been opposed by EBC and hope that Conference of Colleges will follow suit,” he said.“I remain very critical of the manner in which this model was constructed and that necessary consultation was hastily avoided.”In light of the episode, some have claimed that to justify its funding model, OUSU needs to rethink its scope, level and purpose.The OUSU Rep for Magdalen college, Tom Meakin welcomed this re-examination. He said, “I think the one great thing that can come out of this is that OUSU will have to more overtly justify its existence to JCRs. This will force people to go back to the drawing board and think about what they want from their student union. It will enable everyone who has an active role within the organisation be they JCR presidents, sabbatical officers or OUSU reps to take an active role in redefining what should be and what can be an organisation that caters for the needs of Oxford students.” The financial future of the Oxford University Students’ Union (OUSU) has been plunged into uncertainty after plans to restructure its funding was roundly rejected.University officials and student representatives had toiled for months on how to shore up the organisation’s shaky finances, but their proposals were dismissed at a meeting of Oxford bursars this week.The Working Party on OUSU funding are headed back to the drawing board following the snub from the Estates Bursars Committee (EBC).The group began their review into OUSU’s financial structure late last year, amid concerns that the institution’s sources of income were inherently unstable.As things stand, OUSU revenue is generated via a combination of ad hoc University grants, common room affiliation fees and profits from its commercial wing, Oxford Student Services Limited (OSSL).There are major doubts however over the stability of these funding sources, forcing OUSU to restructure or face cutbacks in key services.In response to the ongoing financial struggles, the Working Party on OUSU funding was set up by the Joint Committee of Council with Student Members (JCC). They proposed a new funding model, which brought colleges in as a fourth contributor to the OUSU budget.The proposal was scrutinised by bursars at the EBC last Thursday. Although official feedback has not yet been released, it is believed that the model was strongly condemned, with some bursars labeling the reforms little more than “a sticking plaster.”While the EBC was asked only to advise upon rather than accept or reject the proposal, it is very unlikely the JCC will be able pass the changes without their supportlast_img read more

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Mishawaka crash involving Indiana State Trooper results in injuries

first_img Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Mishawaka crash involving Indiana State Trooper results in injuries Pinterest By Tommie Lee – September 1, 2020 0 248 WhatsApp Google+ (Photo supplied/Elkhart Truth) A rollover crash Tuesday afternoon in Mishawaka involving a State Trooper resulted in minor injuries.It happened at the corner of Main and Battell Streets.The Trooper’s car had front-end damage as a result of the crash, and the other car ended up on its side. The driver of that vehicle reportedly didn’t see the trooper while crossing Main Street.That driver suffered minor injuries and the trooper was said to be up and moving when first responders arrived. Facebook Previous articleElkhart County Board expands landfill, approves bridge design fundingNext articleGun business booming in Indiana, leading to ammo shortage Tommie Lee Pinterest IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Google+last_img read more

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Medical hope on horizon

first_imgA tea bag–sized packet of insulin beta cells implanted in the arm eventually may replace the parade of pricks and daily insulin injections necessary to monitor and regulate blood sugar levels in a diabetic. That’s the vision that Douglas Melton, co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), shared with HUBweek attendees last week.At the event, the institute hosted the first “Horizons in Regenerative Medicine” series, three panel discussions showcasing how stem cells can provide new therapies, fresh ways to model disease, and new approaches to understanding fundamental biological processes such as aging.For the first panel, “A Quantum Leap in Diabetes,” Melton was joined by Gordon Weir and Peter Amenta of the Joslin Diabetes Center, a Harvard-affiliated treatment and research institution; Sayeed Malek of Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), also a Harvard affiliate; and Robert Millman of Semma Therapeutics. All of the panelists are working together in the Boston Autologous Islet Replacement Therapy (BAIRT) program, a collaborative between HSCI, those hospitals, and the biotech startup with the goal of finding a cure for diabetes.“We have a good plan for the next generation of treatments, which will eliminate the glucose level checks and injections of insulin, and instead make what we call ‘nature’s own solution’ to the problem,” said Melton, who is also Xander University Professor in Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB).Melton spent the past 10 years developing the recipe to turn stem cells into beta cells and recently received the Ogawa-Yamanaka Stem Cell Prize for his efforts.Now, using a process that was first described by Nobel Prize laureate Shinya Yamanaka in 2006, researchers can take a sample of blood cells from a diabetic and turn them into pluripotent stem cells. Thirty days after that, and a six-step process later, lab technicians can turn those stem cells into beta cells that can then be transplanted back into the same patient, offering healthy replacements for the diseased or dysfunctional cells. Because the cells are returning to the same body, the body’s immune system will not flag them as foreign and attack or destroy them.BAIRT is planning a clinical trial to test these stem cell–derived beta cells in patients who have had their pancreas removed.In addition to creating therapeutic solutions, stem cells also offer a new paradigm for understanding diseases and for discovering and testing drug therapies.Advances allow for unique disease modelsFor decades, understanding how diseases work was limited to data gathered by studying biopsied tissues removed from patients or, for those diseases that affect tissues that cannot be removed, from mouse and other animal models.However, as panelists in the second “Horizons in Regenerative Medicine” discussion pointed out, although mouse models are useful for determining a starting point in understanding disease mechanisms, they have proven ineffective for studying diseases of the brain.Separated from humans by 90 million years of evolution, mice are fundamentally different both genetically and behaviorally. Unlike humans, mice are nocturnal, their dominant sense is olfactory, and they have very different social behaviors and cognitive abilities.Mice, for example, don’t naturally develop Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease, and as a result there is no way to verify whether a mouse model actually represents a given disease or condition.“What would a schizophrenic mouse look like, and how would we know it has schizophrenia?” asked panelist Steve Hyman, director of the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, HSCI principal faculty member, and Harvard Distinguished Service Professor in HSCRB. “Are they hearing squeaks?”Instead, researchers can use stem cell science to create diseased human cells in a petri dish and then compare those cells to healthy human cells.“We are at the beginning of a very exciting time that is going to change the way in which we investigate these disorders,” Hyman said.The three panelists, who included HSCI principal faculty members Kevin Eggan of Harvard and the Broad Institute and Adam Cohen of Harvard, were careful not to overhype or overpromise the current state of the field. Stem cell technology is, as Eggan cautioned, still “in its infancy.”Neurons created from stem cells more closely resemble neurons from a newborn in that they have not experienced a lifetime of wear and tear like the neurons of patients with late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease.That said, disease modeling in a dish has become more advanced, allowing for more sophisticated models of more sophisticated diseases, said the panel. For example, Paola Arlotta and Lee Rubin of Harvard are creating multiple types of neurons in a single dish and letting them self-assemble into complete circuits, or mini-brains. Such mini-organs, or organoids, more closely reflect the complexity of the vast and interconnected neuronal networks in the brain.Each person has about 86 billion neurons in the brain; these neurons are each connected to about 10,000 other neurons. Because of this, diseases in the brain affect not a single cell type but an entire circuit, and organoids enable the study of networks of cells, circuits, and electrical communication.But how to collect data on these circuits is a challenge.“We can’t see the electricity in a cell any more than we can see the electricity in this wire,” said Cohen, pointing to a wire on stage. “If researchers can’t measure the electricity of the neurons, they will have difficulty finding drugs that restore normal firing patterns.”To overcome this obstacle, Cohen developed a device that uses light-sensitive proteins to stimulate and record electrical energy in a single cell and in networks of cells.Using this tool, Eggan and colleague Clifford Woolf measured the activity of ALS-diseased motor neurons. ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that attacks the circuit that sends electrical impulses from the brain, down long motor neurons extending out into the limbs, and into the muscle tissue.Eggan and Woolf found that the diseased motor neurons are hyperexcitable, meaning they fire more often than healthy neurons. Because they are more active, the diseased motor neurons wear out more quickly and expire, severing the line of communication between the brain and the muscles. This leaves patients without the ability to talk, walk, and breathe as the disease progresses, and eventually leads to paralysis and death.The scientists used the ALS-affected motor neurons to test for compounds that calm the hyperexcitability and found that an FDA-approved drug called retigabine may be a potential therapeutic. The team, in collaboration with the ALS Association and GlaxoSmithKline, has begun recruiting patients for a clinical trial to test the effects of retigabine on ALS patients.As part of the trial, Eggan and his colleagues will make motor neurons from the enrolled patients and test the effects of retigabine on the cells to see if the patient’s neurons made in a dish react the same way as the patient’s neurons in the body. If so, the trial will confirm that these cells could be used to predict how individual patients respond to specific drugs.Studying age-related diseasesAnother approach to determining how to restore normal cellular function is to study cells in an environment where they naturally stop working. Amy Wagers and Richard Lee, both HSCI principal faculty and HSCRB professors, search for factors in multiple body systems that impede repair and regeneration as people age. In pinpointing these factors, they may be able to “turn back the clock” on those cells so that people can remain mobile and healthy throughout life. Increasing health span, not life span, is their mantra.“The field of aging research isn’t about the fountain of youth,” explained William Mair, assistant professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “That’s not the reason we do this research. It’s really because public health enabled us to live a long time in the last 100 years, and what it’s given us is an extended period of time to live in an unhealthy state. And the challenge is to find ways to make those extra years healthy ones.”Wagers, Lee, and Mair were joined by Paola Sabatini of Boston University and HSCI principal faculty member Tracy Young-Pearse of BWH for “Ageless Aging,” the third panel discussion of the Hubweek series. They discussed how the field of regenerative medicine was informing approaches to research involving the aging process.One way to do that is to tackle age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. As Alzheimer’s progresses and more neurons in the brain die, those affected suffer from memory loss and a decline in their cognitive abilities.“If doctors have to wait until these symptoms have presented, the neurons have already died, and it will be difficult to regain function,” said Young-Pearse, whose lab seeks to understand the underlying mechanisms of Alzheimer’s and identify new therapeutic interventions.Before the neurons die, amyloid beta plaques and tau protein tangles build up in the brain. Young-Pearse’s lab is working with Biogen on a new trial to test an antibody that targets amyloid beta protein.Rather than studying the process that goes wrong during aging, Sabatini looks at what is working in the body. Bridging scientific disciplines, she compares centenarians’ genetic, behavioral, and medical histories to understand the perfect storm of conditions that has allowed them to live long and healthy lives.The greater Boston biomedical ecosystem sits as a backdrop not just for Sabatini but for the many scientific collaborations and therapeutic advancements presented during the “Horizons of Regenerative Medicine” series and other HUBweek events.“One of the fantastic things about living in Boston is that we are probably the world’s epicenter, if not the world’s best place, to do biomedicine,” said Melton, who gives credit to the caliber of research institutes, hospitals, biotech startup companies, and pharmaceutical companies in the area.In reference to the movement of his research from the lab to the clinic, Melton said, “Frankly, this would not have been possible if this work had been started somewhere else.”last_img read more

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Gina McCarthy questions proposed car emission rollbacks

first_imgA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plan to undo an Obama-era rule requiring vehicles to average 54.5 miles per gallon (mpg) by 2025, announced April 2 by EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, will harm air quality and public health, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Gina McCarthy.McCarthy, who served as EPA Administrator from 2013–17 under President Barack Obama and who is now director of Harvard Chan School’s Center for Health and the Global Environment, was quoted about Pruitt’s plan in several media outlets. “This is really all about continued work by this administration to undermine or roll back everything the Obama Administration did or considered,” she said on the WBUR show “Radio Boston” on April 3, 2018. She said that there is nothing about rolling back the emissions standards “that is actually going to be beneficial to public health, beneficial to our actions to address climate change, or beneficial to the industry itself.”McCarthy was also interviewed on CNN’s “New Day” on April 6 and on MSNBC’s “Kasie DC” on April 8 regarding the leadership direction at the EPA. Speaking about current EPA chief Scott Pruitt on MSNBC, McCarthy said, “You have an administrator who isn’t focused on the mission of the agency, who is solely looking at costs to industry rather than public health and lives saved.”Listen to WBUR’s “Radio Boston” interview: Former EPA Administrator Says Rollback Of Emissions Standards is ‘Heartbreaking’Watch CNN’s “New Day” interview: How Scott Pruitt is reshaping the EPAWatch MSNBC’s “Kasie DC” interview: Former EPA head McCarthy: Pruitt ‘hiding in his office’Read a Huffington Post article: EPA To Gut The Only Major Federal Rule To Cut Climate Pollution From Vehicles Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Winter canning

first_imgSterilize your canning jars by boiling empty, washed and rinsedjars for 10 minutes in water. The easiest way to do this is tostand empty jars up on a rack in a boiling-water canner filledwith clean water.Measure the sugar and set it aside. Mix the juice and water in asaucepan and stir in the powdered pectin. Bring the mixture to afull boil over high heat, stirring constantly. Once it’s boiling,stir in all of the sugar. Keep stirring and bring the mixture toa full boil that can’t be stirred down. Let it boil hard for 1minute, stirring constantly.Remove it from heat and skim off the foam quickly. Pour the hotjelly immediately into the hot, sterile jars, leaving one-fourthinch of headspace.Wipe the jar rims with a dampened paper towel. Adjust thetwo-piece, metal canning lids. Process them in a boiling-watercanner for 5 to 15 minutes, depending on the altitude.Easy hot sauceIf jelly isn’t your thing, try an easy hot-sauce recipe to spicethings up. It’s great for stirring into vegetables or cheese dipsand spicing up soups and chili. It yields four half-pint jars.You’ll need: Wear gloves when handling, cutting and seeding hot peppers orwash your hands thoroughly with soap and water before touchingyour face or eyes.Start by washing half-pint canning jars. Keep them hot untilyou’re ready to use them. Prepare lids by the manufacturer’sdirections.Place the mixed pickling spices in a spice bag and tie the endsfirmly. Mix all ingredients in a Dutch oven or large saucepan.Bring them to a boil, stirring occasionally. Let them simmer for20 minutes or until the tomatoes are soft.Press the mixture through a food mill. Return the liquid to thepot and boil it for 15 minutes. Then pour it into the clean, hot,half-pint jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace.Remove air bubbles and adjust the headspace if needed. Wipe thejar rims with a damp paper towel to remove any residue and applytwo-piece metal canning lids.Process the hot sauce in a boiling-water canner for 10 to 20minutes, depending on the altitude. Allow it to cool undisturbed12 to 24 hours and check the seals.More recipesFor more winter recipes, specific process times for your altitudeor tips on year-round preservation, visit the Center for HomeFood Preservation Web site at homefoodpreservation.com.The center is hosted by the University of Georgia College ofFamily and Consumer Sciences.(April Reese is a writer for the National Center for Home FoodPreservation with the University of Georgia College of Family andConsumer Sciences.) 12 ounces concentrated orange juice, thawed2 1/2 cups water4 1/2 cups sugar1 box powdered regular pectin By April ReeseUniversity of GeorgiaIn the spring and summer, vegetables from gardens can keep youcanning or freezing until you wear out. But by the time wintercomes, you may be ready to try some different preserves.New recipes from the Center for Home Food Preservation can makecanning a fun, delicious activity to add flavor and spice to thewinter, says Elizabeth Andress, director of the center.”There are recipes perfect for people yearning to can in thewinter,” Andress said. “You don’t always have to can with freshfruits and vegetables. Some of those preserves also make niceholiday gifts.”Orange jellyThis recipe calls for frozen concentrated juice and powderedpectin. It yields five or six half-pint jars of a flavorfulorange jelly for toast or biscuits on dreary winter mornings.You’ll need: 8 cups canned, diced tomatoes, undrained1 1/2 cups seeded, chopped Serrano peppers4 cups distilled white vinegar (5 percent)2 teaspoons canning salt2 tablespoons whole mixed pickling spiceslast_img read more

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Blue Ridge Marathon Celebrates 10 Years of More than Just Running

first_imgShowcase a Region: The race course shows that there is something special about the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains and lifestyle of the Roanoke Region. The course features three separate mountain-top vistas, historic homes, an eclectic downtown, and finishes in the open-air amphitheater at Elmwood Park. The race has drawn attention from national media including The Weather Channel, ESPN, USA Today, Conde Nast Traveler, Delta Sky Magazine, and Runner’s World.Engage a Healthy, Active Community: The community is involved in every aspect of the race. More than 600 volunteers work to pull off this monster event and race options such as the Carilion Children’s Family 1 Miler and walking options, make America’s Toughest more accessible. There are also tailgating parties in the front yards of spectators along the course; many runners cite these homemade aid stations as what makes the race special. Give Back in a Big Way: The Blue Ridge Marathon, which is put on by the Roanoke Outside Foundation, is a 100 percent nonprofit race. Every dollar earned goes toward dozens of nonprofits throughout the region. To date, the Blue Ridge Marathon has donated $185,000 to community organizations. Benefiting charities run the gambit from groups with a mission to empower girls through running to sexual assault awareness organizations to the preservation of historic buildings to developing trail networks. Economic Impact: In addition to supporting nonprofits, the race has had a significant impact on the entire Roanoke Region. Since the inception of the Blue Ridge Marathon, the race has contributed $4.5 million to the regional economy. That’s money that comes into the region from travelers attending the event, hotel stays, eating at restaurants, shopping at local businesses, and visiting regional attractions. The activity supports new jobs (6.9 jobs in 2017) each year. The 10th anniversary of America’s Toughest Road Race is a milestone for charitable giving and regional economic impact.The Foot Levelers Blue Ridge Marathon is known as one of the toughest races in the world. (The Weather Channel and Runner’s World  have both noted its challenging mountain route and scenic beauty.)On April 13, Blue Ridge celebrates its 10th anniversary in Roanoke, Virginia.  Even if you aren’t a runner, this event makes room for you to participate in a weekend that’s more than “just a race.” In addition to race distances including a double marathon, marathon, half marathon, 10K, relay, and 1-mile fun run, Roanoke hosts a weekend-long music festival. Known as America’s Toughest Road Marathon, the race has earned kudos from runners from all over the country and leverages that to benefit the entire region in several ways: Whether you are from the Roanoke Region of Virginia or just visiting, being part of the Blue Ridge Marathon is something special. The race is known for a friendly atmosphere, great swag, and an amazing sense of accomplishment when you tackle these mountains. Let’s celebrate 10 years of making a difference in the world and being the healthiest versions of ourselves at America’s Toughest Road Races.last_img read more

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