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GetBucks Financial Services Limited (GBFS.zw) 2016 Abridged Report

first_imgGetBucks Financial Services Limited (GBFS.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2016 abridged results.For more information about GetBucks Financial Services Limited (GBFS.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the GetBucks Financial Services Limited (GBFS.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: GetBucks Financial Services Limited (GBFS.zw)  2016 abridged results.Company ProfileGetBucks Zimbabwe provides unsecured loan products and educational loans to low income earners employed in the formal sector. Their product offering includes salary advances and term loans, aswell as an operation that accepts savings deposits. GetBucks Zimbabwe has a nationwide footprint with 14 branches in major towns and cities of Zimbabwe. The company is majority-owned (50.3%) by GetBucks Limited, a holding company domiciled in Mauritius and wholly-owned by MyBucks SA. The remaining shares are held by Brainworks Capital Management (Private) Limited, DBF Capital Partners Limited and local pension funds with a combined sharing holding of 10%. GetBucks Zimbabwe is registered and supervised by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe under its Microfinance Act. GetBucks Zimbabwe is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Philadelphia 11 ordinations marked with calls for continued justice work

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis August 2, 2014 at 10:51 am I was only able to attend the symposium. Dr. Thompsett’s keynote was extraordinary! Unfortunately, due to time constraints, there was little interaction between the panelists during the panel discussion session and no audience participation. I share Betsy Wendt’s concern about the “unsung saints” and to that number I add Fr. Paul Washington who offered the use of the Church of the Advocate for the ordination service and Fr. Peter Beebe of Christ Church, Oberlin, OH, who like Fr. Wendt, was disciplined for inviting eucharistic participation by members of the Philadelphia Eleven. I was a freshman at Oberlin College in 1975 and I remember the tension at Christ Church due to a split in the congregation over Fr. Beebe’s on-going activity in support of women’s ordination. Darlene O’Dell’s book is an excellent resource on so many of those involved in this story. Perhaps as we look toward the 50th anniversary in 2024 we can plan a day-long conference that will allow a more thorough examination of these events that are historically significant, that changed the priesthood/episcopate, and that inspire on-going struggles for social justice. July 28, 2014 at 6:32 pm About 20 years ago I met with Rev. Carter Heyward after she had given the Keynote address at the GIGNITY/USA Convention in NOLA. I asked her if she knew if the then, small and only Episcopal Church in my City would be agreeable to accepting a gay man. Long story short, after several trans-continental phone chats, I came home to a message: “Green Light”!. I followed instructions, called St. Stephen’s Church in Santa Clarita, CA, met Rev. Lynn Jay and sometime thereafter was received into ECUSA by Bp. Fred Borsch. It is said: “this is the day that the Lord has made.”, but that was the day that I was made! Up until that day in my 50+ years on the Planet, I had never felt so whole, so complete, so fully accepted by my Creator and best of all, those two constant daily fights that went on between my head’s interpretation of Sexuality and Spirituality came to a complete halt. I am so grateful to Rev. Carter and to the Episcopal Church for all that has occurred in, with and for my life since “that” day! Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Rector Knoxville, TN August 6, 2014 at 8:23 pm Dear Betsy, I told Carter about your comment and she asked me to tell you that Chapter 10 of Darlene O’Dell’s book, “The Story of the Philadelphia Eleven,” features your dad prominently. I haven’t been able to read the book yet but I am so looking forward to it. Meanwhile, I posted a section called “The Trials of the Rev. Bill Wendt and the Rev. Peter Beebe, Spring of 1975″ on http://philadelphiaordinations.blogspot.com/On reading your comment I’m thinking you were referring to the symposium itself, and Fredrica’s address. But I wanted you to know that your father is definitely remembered with deep appreciation for his courage and integrity, as well as his intelligence and creativity in living out the Gospel teachings of holy ethics. He remains a Christ-like hero to countless people, including the Eleven, and he will always be a hero in our hearts. Near the end of that section of my web blog I wrote this message for them and their families, and send it to you directly here: Forty years later, I take this moment publicly to thank, to bless, and again to embrace these two men of integrity and Christian courage, our brothers in Christ Bill Wendt and Peter Beebe, who stood beside us and stood up to bear witness to Christian conscience and the teachings of Christ, following the example of Christ’s acceptance of and respect for women, created in the image of God, female. Thank you, with all my heart, Peter Beebe and Bill Wendt, and your families and all those who suffered with you, for being true to the end. Wherever you are in the Great Communion now, may this acknowledgement and my eternal thanks reverberate to you and bless you. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Philadelphia 11 ordinations marked with calls for continued justice work 40th anniversary celebration includes memories, speeches, joyous Eucharist, Tim Trautmann says: Arthur K. Sudler says: Featured Jobs & Calls July 30, 2014 at 11:07 am Aunt Merrill, your family is so proud of this great accomplishment by you and your sisters! GO Aunt Merrill !!! By the way, Pete says there is still much wood to chop when I come to visit this fall. Is this true? Love, Tim Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 28, 2014 Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 29, 2014 at 10:45 am For those of us women priests who were not able to be in Philly, is there a way to get a copy of the program and one of the fans. I’m so proud of our sisters and for all the firsts: the Philadelphia 11, Barbara Harris, Katherine Jefferts Schori and those who worked that we might be ordained. Praise God. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 30, 2014 at 7:40 pm I was about 9 or 10 when my aunt Merrill was ordained. She is a woman of extraordinary strength and love. I have read segments of her interview with Odells book. I am in awe of her and these woman for their leadership, faith and internal strength. I am very proud of them. Peter Trautmann says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA August 4, 2014 at 12:59 pm Father Wendt’s important role in the history of women’s ordination is included in our interactive timeline that was published the same day as this story. You can access it here https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2014/07/28/ordination-timeline/ You will see him in the background photo and information about his role is in the event headlined “Celebration and prosecution.” Ann Fontaine says: Betsy Wendt says: Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 6, 2014 at 8:03 pm Good idea. Though I did not write about Paul Washington beyond a general sense, thanking him for his great risk-taking hospitality, I quoted his descriptive epithet as “the Conscience of the City,” which was his identity as a Christian activist and how Philadelphians regarded him, but he features prominently here: http://tributetobishopbarbaraharris.blogspot.com/. for Peter Beebe and Bill Wendt, see “The Trials of the Rev. Bill Wendt and the Rev. Peter Beebe, Spring of 1975” section on the 40th anniversary additions to my web blog, http://philadelphiaordinations.blogspot.com/ There needs to be more, for certain! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 28, 2014 at 6:45 pm What is the design on the fan? July 31, 2014 at 8:16 pm I regret that my father, Rev. William Wendt, of St. Stephen’s wasn’t mentioned. He was officially reprimanded by the Episcopalian church for inviting Rev. Cheek to participate in the service following the ordination. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Women’s Ordination 40th Anniversary Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Philadelphia 11, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Alla Bozarth says: Rector Albany, NY Women’s Ministry, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Among those who attended the July 26 celebration in Philadelphia were some history-makers. They included, left to right, the Rev. Alison Cheek (Philadelphia 11), retired Bishop of Costa Rica Antonio Ramos (who joined in the laying on of hands at the Philadelphia 11 ordinations), the Rev. Carter Heyward (Philadelphia 11), Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori (whose election in 2006 made her the first women primate in the Anglican Communion), the Rev. Merrill Bittner (Philadelphia 11), the Rev. Betty Powell (one of the Washington Four who were ordained in September 1975), the Rev. Marie Moorefield Fleischer (Philadelphia 11), the Rev. Nancy Wittig (Philadelphia 11) and retired Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Barbara Harris (who is this year celebrating the 25th anniversary of her consecration as the first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion). Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceAn interactive timeline of the history of women’s ordination in the Anglican Communion is here.[Episcopal News Service – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] A joyous celebration of the 40th anniversary of women’s priestly ordination on July 26 here included calls for people to realize that the dream of a more egalitarian and less patriarchal Episcopal Church – and society – that was embodied by the Philadelphia 11’s ordinations requires much more work.“I wonder why we cannot speed up the work of gender justice and aligned oppressions in the days and years ahead,” Fredrica Thompsett Harris, Mary Wolfe Professor Emerita of Historical Theology at Episcopal Divinity School, asked during her keynote address to a symposium that kicked off a day meant to celebrate the July 29, 1974, ordinations of 11 women deacons at Church of the Advocate here. “This would be one way to honor our courageous sisters and those who stood with them.”The Rev. Merrill Bittner, the Rev. Alison Cheek, the Rev. Alla Bozarth, the Rev. Emily C. Hewitt, the Rev. Carter Heyward, the Rev. Suzanne R. Hiatt, the Rev. Marie Moorefield, the Rev. Jeanette Piccard, the Rev. Betty Bone Schiess, the Rev. Katrina Welles Swanson and the Rev. Nancy Hatch Wittig were ordained on that day in 1974, slightly more than two years before the General Convention of the Episcopal Church gave its explicit permission for women to become priests.Retired Colorado Bishop Suffragan Daniel Corrigan, retired Pennsylvania Bishop Robert L. DeWitt and retired West Missouri Bishop Edward R. Welles II (Katrina Wells Swanson’s father) were the ordaining bishops. They were joined by Costa Rica Bishop Antonio Ramos, the only one of the four who then was exercising jurisdiction in the church. Ramos did not participate in the actual ordination, but joined in the laying on of hands.The group “40 Years Ordained – 2,000 Years in Ministry”, organized by the Diocese of Pennsylvania in conjunction with others throughout the church, designed the July 26 celebration not just to mark the Philadelphia 11’s ordinations – and those of the Washington Four on Sept. 7, 1975, at St. Stephen and the Incarnation Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. – but also to celebrate the ministry of all women, lay and ordained, in the past, present and future. The gathering included Holy Eucharist at Church of the Advocate, followed by a reception amid displays of various ministries in which women are engaged.Speeding up the progress towards gender justice and eliminating other interlocking oppressions would be a good way to honor the first women ordained to the priesthood in the Episcopal Church, says Fredrica Harris Thompsett, Mary Wolfe Professor Emerita of Historical Theology at Episcopal Divinity School, during her July 26 keynote address. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“This celebration must not be honored by excluding others,” Harris Thompsett said during her keynote address. “It should not be sentimentalized by Hallmark [greeting] card theology, or trivialized by invoking a too-small God, a non-controversial, semi-engaged complacent divinity.”She gave three challenges to the approximately 230 women and men who attended the symposium. The first was to honor the first ordinations of women by becoming “much more insistent advocates for baptism as being chief among Holy Orders,” warning against what she called “creepy theology out there in everyday use” which assumes that deacons, priests and bishops are somehow more connected to God and called to be more prophetic than lay people.The second challenge was to live truly into the “embodied nature of Anglican theology” that emphasizes the goodness of all creation and the dwelling of the incarnate Christ in us and us in him. All people, she said, must claim their bodies “as sacred vehicles of spiritual authority.”Harris Thompsett’s third challenge was very specific, calling for making the House of Bishops 30 percent female in the next 10 years. That would mean electing about 50 or more “highly and diversely qualified women bishops,” she said. To do so would require more attention being paid to discrimination and tokenism in all search processes, including those for the episcopate, she added.The symposium at Temple University also featured a panel of lay and ordained women who responded to Harris Thompsett’s speech. Participants included Bishop Carol Gallagher, the Rev. Miguelina Howell, the Rev. Pamela Nesbit, the Rev. Sandye Wilson and educator and social worker Nokomis Wood. The panel was moderated by the Very Rev. Katherine H. Ragsdale, EDS dean and president. Philadelphia 11 member Wittig closed the symposium with a meditation.Wilson, the rector of St. Andrew and Holy Communion in South Orange, New Jersey, echoed comments made by her fellow panelists and Harris Thompsett about interlocking oppressions. For years black women were invisible in the Episcopal Church, she said.“When they spoke of women, they spoke of white women, and when they spoke of black, they spoke of black men,” she said, adding that “we have to name these things because if we don’t name them, we’re subject to repeat them.”Wilson, who was the fourth African-American woman ordained in the Episcopal Church, said “we need to be sure that we are radically welcoming everyone and that no one is left out or left behind, that the table is set for everyone and that no one on a committee has to advocate for one group or another.”Ragsdale told the symposium that she heard a recurring theme about the “celebration of diversity along with the painful and … grief-giving and infuriating reality of how far we have yet to go in the church and the world to really celebrate that diversity” and the justice that ought to come with it.She added that she also heard a call for people to value all four orders of ministry and to recognize that those in ordained orders must listen to the stories of the work done by lay people outside the doors of the church and empower those ministers to carry on.A Diocese of Pennsylvania video of the panel discussion is here.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori during her sermon at Church of the Advocate uses a pair of red high heels to illustrate the expectations set upon ordained women. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServicePresiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, preaching and presiding at the celebratory Eucharist later in the day, said the entire Episcopal Church gives thanks that women now serve in all orders of ministry. As the congregation of about 600 roared its approval, she turned in the Advocate’s ornate pulpit and bowed to the five members of the Philadelphia 11 and one of the Washington Four who participated in the Eucharist.Jefferts Schori reminded the congregation that women priests have been told that they should not wear high heels or dangly earrings in the pulpit or at the altar. After brandishing a pair of red high heels, she said “Women in all orders of ministry – baptized, deacons, priests, and bishops – can walk proudly today, in whatever kind of shoes they want to wear, because of what happened here 40 years ago.”“We can walk proudly, even if not yet in full equality, knowing that the ranks of those who walk in solidarity are expanding,” she continued.“Try to walk in the shoes of abused and trafficked women. Walk on to Zion carrying the children who are born and suffer in the midst of war,” the presiding bishop said. “Gather up the girls married before they are grown, gather up the schoolgirls still missing in Nigeria, and gather up all those lives wasted in war and prison. March boldly, proclaiming good news to all who have been pushed aside, and call them to the table of God, to Wisdom’s feast.”Video and text of the presiding bishop’s sermon is here.Attending the celebration from among the 11 members of the 1974 ordinations were the Rev. Alison Cheek, the Rev. Carter Heyward, the Rev. Merrill Bittner, the Rev. Marie Moorefield Fleischer and the Rev. Nancy Wittig.Bishop Ramos processed with the women, as did the Rev. Betty Powell, one of the Washington Four, and retired Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Barbara Harris, who this year is celebrating her 25th anniversary of being the first female bishop in the Anglican Communion.Speaking during the announcement time, Ramos told the congregation that on July 29, 1974, “we decided to disobey the order of the church for the sake of the orders of the church.”“We decided to end a discriminatory set of canons to make all the orders of the church both equally inclusive for men and women,” he said.Pennsylvania Bishop Provisional Clifton “Dan” Daniel had been a priest for a year when he decided to participate in the Philadelphia ordinations (priests are often invited to join the ordaining bishop or bishops in the laying on of hands). He reminded the gathering that while the ordinations changed the history of the Episcopal Church, it was also a very personal event for the 11 ordinands.“At the time I think we had a very different sense of what was at stake for us and of how much we had to gain or lose,” Heyward told ENS in an interview. “I just knew it was an important step to take given where the church was and given where I was in my life.”In the same interview, Cheek said her already-raised consciousness “got raised a lot higher after her ordination. “It was a real big turning point in my life and I think that that was because quite a few oppressed groups of folk then reached out to us and wanted us to come celebrate for them,” she said.The Rev. Merrill Bittner, one of the Philadelphia 11 who was honored at the 40th anniversary celebration July 26, distributes communion at the Eucharist. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn addition to experiencing the typical feelings of a person preparing for and then being ordained, before and after, the women were barraged with criticism that veered into outright threats. Called unprintable names, their appearances and their voices were examined and found wanting as were their personalities and intellects. Some were told they would be good for the church because it would be better to see them in the pulpit than ugly, old male rectors. They were accused of being immoral and self-indulgent. One received a length of fish cord with the suggestion that she use it to hang herself, according Darlene O’Dell in her new book “The Story of the Philadelphia Eleven.”On the day of the ordinations, buckets were lined up along the church’s wall in case of bombs or fire, plain-clothed police officers were among the 2,000 congregants, a busload of police were stationed down the street and the congregation included a group of radical lesbians, some trained in crowd control and karate, O’Dell wrote.The path to the Church of the Advocate and beyondWhen, after years of struggle and rejection, the Philadelphia 11 broke the traditional prohibition against the ordination of women to the priesthood of the Episcopal and Anglican Churches they entered a sort of limbo. There was no canon in church law that specifically forbade women from being priests and there was no canon that said only men could become priests.However, the canons did and do still outline a process leading to ordination first to the transitional diaconate and then to the priesthood. The final step of that process before priestly ordination is the approval by one’s standing committee. For women, that never happened.While all 11 had been through the canonical process for ordination to the diaconate (which had been open to women only since 1970), just one of them had received the necessary Standing Committee approval for priestly ordination. Her bishop refused to ordain her. Another’s bishop said he would ordain her if the Standing Committee approved. It did not.None of the eight bishops who had authority over the 11 agreed to the ordinations and the bishop of Pennsylvania objected to the ordinations taking place in that diocese. Bishops in the Episcopal Church are required to ordain only those people who have gone through the ordination process in their dioceses, or they must have the permission of the bishop who supervised that process. Thus, the Philadelphia 11’s ordaining bishops were seen to have violated church law as well as tradition.Charles V. Willie, who preached at the Philadelphia 11 ordinations, is greeted during the peace by the Rev. Renee McKenzie, vicar and chaplain of Church of the Advocate. Willie was vice president of the House of Deputies and a member of the Episcopal Church Executive Council at the time of the ordinations but he resigned both positions in protest when, three weeks later, the House of Bishops invalidated the ordinations. Willie read one of the readings during the July 26 Eucharist. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceOn Aug. 15, 1974, the House of Bishops, called to an emergency meeting that reportedly was by turns rancorous and confused, denounced the ordinations and declared that “the necessary conditions for valid ordination to the priesthood in the Episcopal Church were not fulfilled.” In effect, the bishops said, nothing had happened at the Church of the Advocate and the 11 were still deacons – to whom they offered pastoral care.Charges were filed against the ordaining bishops and attempts, ecclesial and otherwise, were made to prevent the women from exercising their priestly ministries.Still, women’s ordination movement continued. Resigned Rochester Bishop George W. Barrett ordained four women deacons on Sept. 7, 1975, at the Church of St. Stephen and the Incarnation in Washington, D.C., despite Washington Bishop William F. Creighton’s refusal to allow the action. About 1,200, including 50 priests, attended. The Rev. Lee McGee, the Rev. Alison Palmer, the Rev. Betty Powell, all of Washington, D.C., and the Rev. Diane Tickell of Anchorage, Alaska, became known as the Washington Four.In September 1976, the General Convention approved the ordination of women to the priesthood and episcopate by adding a new section to the church’s ordination canons that read: “The provisions of these canons for the admission of Candidates, and for the Ordination to the three Orders: Bishops, Priests and Deacons shall be equally applicable to men and women.”The House of Bishops, during the 1976 convention, at first ruled that the Philadelphia 11 and the Washington Four would have to be re-ordained, calling the first actions “conditional ordinations” similar to the conditional baptism allowed in emergency situations when one is not sure if a person was baptized. The women said they would refuse to be re-ordained and, the next day, the bishops voted unanimously for a “completion” ceremony that would avoid the laying on of hands.The Rev. Betty Powell, one of the Washington Four who were ordained in September 1975 and who was honored during the 40th anniversary celebration July 26, asperges the congregation during the Eucharist that emphasized the ministry of all the baptized. All six of the first women who attended the service sprinkled the congregation members with water from the baptismal font. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe story was not yet over. In October 1977, the House of Bishops adopted “A Statement of Conscience” that assured that “No Bishop, Priest, or Lay Person should be coerced or penalized in any manner, nor suffer any canonical disabilities as a result of his or her conscientious objection to or support of the sixty-fifth General Convention’s actions with regard to the ordination of women to the priesthood or episcopate.”The statement arose out of a meeting that began with Presiding Bishop John Allin saying he did not think “that women can be priests any more than they can become fathers or husbands,” and offering to resign as presiding bishop. The House of Bishops affirmed Allin’s leadership and adopted the “conscience clause” contained in a pastoral letter issued after the meeting.Since the clause was never adopted by the House of Deputies, it had no canonical authority but a handful of bishops and their dioceses used it to bar women from the priesthood for 33 more years.A more complete timeline of the history of women’s ordination in the Anglican Communion is here.A statistical look at ordained women in the Episcopal Church todayChurch Pension Group’s 2014 annual report shows 2,471 ordained women participating in the clergy pension plan, compared with 4,188 males.Male clergy make up 62 percent of recently ordained employed clergy and 66 percent of all employed clergy, according to the organization’s latest State of the Clergy report from 2012.Recently ordained female clergy consistently make between $1,000 to $7,000 less than male clergy of the same age. Also, as female clergy’s age at ordination increases, compensation steadily decreases. Plus, females can expect a $1,766 smaller salary increase when changing parish positions.The report called this gap “striking” and said it points to “significant structural inequalities confronting female clergy when searching for new jobs.”“Our findings reveal that women clergy are consistently realizing smaller gains from taking new jobs than males, regardless of the type of parish they serve,” the report concluded.Also for 2012, the Church Pension Group’s annual Clergy Compensation report showed thatthe median full-time compensation for all male priests, parochial and non-parochial, was slightly more than $10,000 higher than that for female priests ($75,747 for the 3,455 men compared with $65,438 for the 1,827 females).the median full-time compensation for senior male priests was $103,660 compared with $93,566 for senior female priests (there were 572 men in such positions and 138 women)Celebration organizers offered commemorative fans to each of the more than 600 people who came to Church of the Advocate in Philadelphia July 26 to celebrate the July 29, 1974, priestly ordinations of 11 women deacons slightly more than two years before the General Convention of the Episcopal Church gave its explicit permission for women to become priests. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceLearn more about itWhere are the Philadelphia 11 – and their ordaining bishops – now?“The Story of the Philadelphia Eleven,” Darlene O’Dell, (Seabury Books, 2014)“Looking Forward, Looking Back: Forty Years of Women’s Ordination,” Fredrica Harris Thompsett, editor, (Moorehouse Publishing, 2014)“The Spirit of the Lord is Upon Me: The Writings of Suzanne Hiatt,” Carter Heyward and Janine Lehane, editors, (Seabury Books, 2014)“Forty Firsts,” an online series from Episcopal Commons and the Diocese of Los Angeles marking the 40th anniversaryA Diocese of Pennsylvania video about the Philadelphia 11, produced by Barbara Dundon, is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (10) Alla Bozarth says: Judith Davis says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Malcolm J Blue says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

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Presiding Bishop offers election message, encourages voting as ‘a Christian…

first_img Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Iris Walters says: 3:07[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] “Voting and participation in our government is a way of participating in our common life,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry said in a video election message.  “And that is a Christian obligation. Indeed, we who follow in the Way of Jesus of Nazareth are summoned to participate actively as reflections of our faith in the civil process.”The Presiding Bishop’s video election message is here. The video is closed-captioned and is subtitled in Spanish. The text of the Presiding Bishop’s message in English and Spanish is located at the end of this note.The video is ideal for conversation, adult forums and group gatherings, Sunday School, youth groups, conventions, and meetings, etc.Election Toolkit and resourcesThe Episcopal Church online toolkit with webpage outlines how individual Episcopalians and congregations can participate in the electoral process through nonpartisan activities. Among the possible non-partisan activities offered are: engaging young adults who are eligible to vote for the first time; hosting a candidate forum; advocating for voting rights legislation; and hosting Get Out The Vote campaigns. Through the Episcopal Public Policy Network (EPPN), information is also available on an important initiative, the Episcopal Pledge to Vote• Election engagement resources, including the downloadable Episcopal Election Engagement Toolkit, are available here.• Bulletin inserts are available here.• A Facebook/Twitter social media campaign highlighting: state-by-state registration deadlines; information on voting rights; ways to support civil discourse; and historical fun facts of Episcopal political engagement through the centuries of our country. Facebook here and Twitter here.• Hashtag #EpiscopaliansVoteThe Presiding Bishop’s message in English follows:Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Election MessageThis November we will gather together as a nation to vote not only to elect a new president but to elect governmental leaders on a variety of levels.We are blessed.  We are blessed as a nation to be able to do so as citizens of this country.  This is a right, an obligation, and a duty.  And indeed the right and the privilege to be able to vote is something that was won through an American revolution.  Something that was won even more through civil rights and women’s suffrage.  A right and a privilege that was won for all.  So I encourage you to please go and vote.  Vote your conscience.  Vote your perspective.  But vote.But it’s not just simply a civil obligation and duty.  Voting and participation in our government is a way of participating in our common life.  And that is a Christian obligation.  Indeed, we who follow in the Way of Jesus of Nazareth are summoned to participate actively as reflections of our faith in the civil process.In the thirteenth chapter of Romans, sometimes a chapter that is debated among scholars and among Christians, St. Paul reminds us that we have a duty and an obligation to participate in the process of government, “For that is how our common life is ordered and structured.”  And at one point he actually says, “For the same reason,” going on, he’s expanding, he says, “For the same reason you also pay taxes for the authorities are God’s servants, busy with everything.”  That’s probably very true.  “Pay to all them that is due them.  Taxes to whom taxes are due.  Revenue to whom revenue is due.  Respect to whom respect is due.  Honor to whom honor is due.”  Now he’s talking about the role of government as helping to order our common life.  But here’s what I want you to really hear.  He continues and says:“So owe no-one anything except to love one another.  For the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.  The commandments ‘You shall not commit adultery’, ‘You shall not murder’, ‘You shall not steal’, ‘You shall not covet’, any other commandment, they are all summed up in this word:  ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’.  Love does no wrong to a neighbor, therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.”For St. Paul, the way of love, the love of neighbor, is the fulfilling not only of the moral law of God, but the way to fulfill the civil law.Go and vote.  Vote your conscience.  Your conscience informed by what it means to love your neighbor.  To participate in the process of seeking the common good.  To participate in the process of making this a better world.  However you vote, go and vote.  And do that as a follower of Jesus.The Most Rev. Michael B. CurryPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchThe Presiding Bishop’s message in Spanish follows:Obispo Presidente Michael Curry Mensaje sobre las eleccionesEste mes de noviembre nos reuniremos como nación para votar, no solo para elegir un nuevo presidente, sino para elegir a líderes gubernamentales en una variedad de niveles.Somos bendecidos. Somos bendecidos como nación por ser capaces de hacerlo como ciudadanos de este país. Esto es un derecho, una obligación y un deber. Y en verdad el derecho y el privilegio de poder votar es algo que se obtuvo mediante una revolución americana. Algo que fue logrado, aún más, a través de los derechos civiles y el sufragio femenino. Un derecho y un privilegio que fue conseguido por todos. Así que les animo a que, por favor, vayan y voten. Voten su conciencia. Voten su perspectiva. Pero voten.Pero no es simplemente una obligación civil y un deber. El votar y participar en nuestro gobierno es una forma de colaborar en la vida común. Y eso es una obligación cristiana. Verdaderamente, a los que seguimos en el Camino de Jesús de Nazaret se nos pide que participemos activamente como reflejo de nuestra fe en el proceso civil.En el capítulo trece de la Carta a los Romanos, -un capítulo que a veces se debate entre los académicos y entre los cristianos-, san Pablo nos recuerda que tenemos el deber y la obligación de participar en el proceso del gobierno, “pues así es cómo nuestra vida en común está ordenada y estructurada”. Y en realidad llega a decir: “Por la misma razón”, continúa, lo amplía, y dice: “por la misma razón ustedes también pagan los  tributos pues las autoridades son funcionarios al servicio de Dios, encargados de cumplir este oficio”. Eso es probablemente muy cierto. “Pagar a cada uno lo que le es debido. Al que se le deben impuestos, impuestos. Al que se le debe contribución, contribución. Al que se le debe respecto, respeto. Al que honor, honor”. Ahora está hablando de la función del gobierno en cuanto ayuda a ordenar nuestra vida en común. Pero aquí está lo que de verdad quiero que oigan. Continúa y dice:“Así que la única deuda que tengan  con los demás  sea la del amor mutuo. Porque el que ama al prójimo ya cumplió toda la ley. Los mandamientos: ‘No cometerás adulterio’, ‘No matarás’, ‘No robarás’, ‘No codiciarás’, y cualquier otro mandamiento, todos están resumidos en esta palabra: ‘Amarás al prójimo como a ti mismo’. El amor no hace mal al prójimo, por eso, el amor es el cumplimiento de la ley”.Para san Pablo, el camino del amor, del amor al prójimo, es el cumplimiento no sólo de la ley moral de Dios, sino la manera de cumplir la ley civil.Vayan y voten. Voten su conciencia. Su conciencia informada por lo que significa amar al vecino. Participen en el proceso de la búsqueda del bien común. Participen en el proceso de hacer de este un mundo mejor. Comoquiera que voten, vayan y voten. Y hagan eso como seguidores de Jesús.El Reverendísimo Michael B. CurryObispo Presidente y PrimadoIglesia Episcopal September 21, 2016 at 11:47 am Interesting outlook….ashamed? You have a right and a responsibility to exercise that right. Bishop Curry is not advocating for one party or another….he is encouraging you to vote. M.E. Eccles says: August 27, 2016 at 6:05 pm I have a sneaking suspicion that most in TEC consider voting a “Christian obligation” only as long as one votes for a Democratic candidate, especially a progressive Democratic candidate. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Donald Trump, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (14) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 23, 2016 at 12:46 pm Why? Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Video Rector Knoxville, TN Bill Harrison says: Rector Tampa, FL JoAnne Silvia says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Terry Francis says: Rector Martinsville, VA August 23, 2016 at 9:58 am I appreciate Bishop Michael’s reference to the “common good”. My struggle is deciding how to vote for “it” as opposed to the “status quo”. His admonition to vote as opposed to staying home is spot on! Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kalena Williams says: Rector Collierville, TN October 14, 2016 at 9:29 am Seems like the Apostle Paul is suggesting we should vote. I wonder if the ashamed guy feels he doesn’t have a choice that will satisfy his conscience. That concept taken to it’s logical conclusion would always preclude voting. We are either going to have to vote for some less than perfect or let others decide for us. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Presiding Bishop offers election message, encourages voting as ‘a Christian obligation’ Election Toolkit provides resources for congregations, individuals Faith & Politics, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Pegram Johnson III, PHD says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC August 31, 2016 at 11:23 pm Actually, the “Christian obligation” (to use the questinable quotation marks of the previous post) that Bp. Curry was referencing is to measure the comments & message of the candidates by the Gospel and our Baptismal Vows (to review those see the “Rite of Holy Baptism” beginning on page 299 in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Thomas Bushnell BSG says: Kenneth Knapp says: August 25, 2016 at 4:49 pm As am I. Election 2016, Joel Watson says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls September 15, 2016 at 10:46 pm “New occasions teach new duties, time makes ancient good uncouth.” – – 1940 HymnalThe comment about Episcopalians voting for Democrats I find odd. As a priest I can tell you that there are a lot of conservatives in the pews (usually the trouble-makers). An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest M.E. Eccles says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service September 2, 2016 at 12:09 pm I took my baptismal vows using the 1928 prayer book. I don’t remember what page it was on nor do I remember it saying anything about voting. Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Carol Mader says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab September 17, 2016 at 10:39 pm I completely agree with Bushnell. First time ashamed to be an Episcpalian. Glad I am retired and not be expected to publish this. Comments are closed. August 24, 2016 at 12:33 pm I am just as proud of Bishop Curry as ever. Rector Pittsburgh, PA November 18, 2016 at 4:22 pm “As a priest I can tell you there are a lot of conservatives in the pews (usually the trouble-makers).” You are a priest of the Episcopal Church? Sad. Tags David Kemp says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA August 23, 2016 at 6:56 pm I am curious also, as to why you are ashamed? Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Rocky Rachal says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET August 23, 2016 at 12:47 am For the first time I am ashamed of Bishop Curry. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Aug 22, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Las políticas del gobierno de Trump sobresalen en la sesión…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH General Convention 2018, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Refugees Migration & Resettlement Immigration, Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Por David PaulsenPosted Jul 9, 2018 General Convention, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Faith & Politics, La Rda. Nancy Frausto, “soñadora” y diputada de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles, testifica el 7 de julio en la audiencia conjunta sobre las resoluciones de inmigración Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] Pocos temas se debatirán tan enfáticamente en la 79ª. Convención General como el de la inmigración. La reunión trienal de la Iglesia Episcopal se está celebrando en la capital de este estado fronterizo en medio de un continuo clamor por la política de “tolerancia cero” del gobierno de Trump hacia los inmigrantes que entran en el país, una política que hasta hace poco conllevaba la separación de los niños de sus padres detenidos.La Convención General estudia nueve resoluciones sobre la migración y la inmigración, y las nueve estaban en la agenda de una audiencia conjunta de los dos comités legislativos, que tuvo lugar el 7 de julio en el hotel JW Marriot, justo al oeste del centro de convenciones.“Necesitamos una declaración que diga que estas familias le importan a esta Iglesia”, dijo el Rdo. José Rodríguez-Sanjuro diputado suplente de la Diócesis de Florida Central.Alrededor de dos docenas de personas testificaron, entre ellas obispos centroamericanos, sacerdotes de estados fronterizos, episcopales activos en el reasentamiento de refugiados y al menos una “soñadora” [dreamer], la Rda. Nancy Frausto, que al igual que otros [de su condición] fue traída ilegalmente a Estados Unidos siendo niña. Ella ahora es sacerdote en la Diócesis de Los Ángeles.“Los 800.000 soñadores deben contar con el respaldo de la Iglesia Episcopal, y no sólo ellos sino todos los inmigrantes”, dijo Frausto, al hablar a favor de la Resolución C033, que declara oficialmente que la Iglesia respeta la dignidad de los inmigrantes y bosqueja la manera en que la política debe reflejar esa creencia.“Lo voy a poner en términos sencillos: esto salva vidas”, dijo Frausto, que también fue una de los tres panelistas que discutieron la reconciliación racial el 6 de julio en la primera de las tres Conversaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal [TEConversations] programadas como sesiones conjuntas de la Convención General.Los dos comités de justicia social, uno centrado en la política de Estados Unidos y el otro en la política internacional, celebraron la audiencia para tener reacciones sobre las resoluciones que abarcan una amplia gama de temas, incluidos el proporcionar santuario a inmigrantes que enfrentan deportación, condenar la separación de familias migrantes, respaldar a los haitianos que se preparan para ser deportados y exigir una legislación que les otorgue un estatus legal permanente a los “soñadores” a través de la legislación federal que se conoce como la Ley DREAM[*].La Convención General se ha pronunciado sobre temas de inmigración a través de resoluciones que se remontan a los años ochenta [del pasado siglo]. Entre ellas una resolución de 2012 que insta la aprobación de la Ley DREAM. Este año la Resolución C002  pide la aprobación de una Ley DREAM “limpia”, una referencia a acontecimientos políticos recientes que han empantanado el progreso de la legislación desde que el presidente Donald Trump le puso fin a una política del Poder Ejecutivo que les brindaba protección a los “soñadores”.Las resoluciones aprobadas por la Convención General pueden ser usadas, para su labor de promoción social, por la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales, que tiene su sede en Washington, D.C. y que lleva a cabo tareas de promoción [o defensa] social mediante apelaciones directas a las oficinas del Congreso o a través de movilizaciones de la Red Episcopal de Política Pública.De las nueve resoluciones sobre inmigración que se encuentran ante la Convención General, el comité de política internacional está revisando sólo una, la D009, pero esa sola es sustancial. Con el título de “Principios cristianos en respuesta a la migración humana” sienta algunas de los fundamentos bíblicos y teológicos para la defensa social de la Iglesia en tales asuntos, así como la aplicación de esas creencias en el mundo real.El Rdo. Paul Moore, sacerdote episcopal de Silver City, Nuevo México, y presidente del Ministerio Fronterizo de Río Grande, testificó a favor de la D009, hablando en inglés y luego traduciéndose el mismo al español, y citó varios pasajes bíblicos que respaldan la sensibilización de la Iglesia hacia los inmigrantes.“Acojan a los extranjeros, para que no dejemos de hospedar ángeles”, dijo él, parafraseando un pasaje de Hebreos.Angela Smith testificó de su trabajo con el Ministerio de Migración de San Francisco de Asís, en Kansas, una filial del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, una de las nueve agencias que tienen contratos con el Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. para reasentar refugiados en este país. El número de reasentamientos ha descendido bajo la égida de Trump, lo cual, según Smith, está afectando el prestigio del país en el mundo.“Esto no es lo que somos. No es quienes queremos ser” dijo Smith. “Los refugiados enriquecen nuestras comunidades a lo largo y ancho de Estados Unidos. Aportan alegría y nos hacen mejores”.Más de 100 personas asistieron a la audiencia conjunta del 7 de julio sobre resoluciones de inmigración en el hotel JW Marriot en Austin, Texas, durante la 79ª. Convención General. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.Y el Rdo. Chris Easthill, diputado de la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa, enfatizó que los problemas en torno a la migración no son exclusivos de Estados Unidos, y que la Iglesia puede ayudar a contener la marea de temor y de odio.“La migración [impone] una gran división política en todo el mundo”, dijo Easthill. “Necesitamos una sólida respuesta cristiana”.La audiencia tuvo lugar mientras los obispos y diputados que asisten a la Convención General planean, de motu proprio una respuesta visible: un viaje programado para el 8 de julio a un centro de detención federal de inmigración que queda a poco más de media hora de Austin. Está previsto un oficio de oración para alrededor del mediodía frente al Centro de Detención Residencial T. Don Hutto, y el calendario legislativo del domingo se ajustó para darle cabida a los que deseen asistir.El oficio de oración se preparó en respuesta a la política del gobierno de Trump hacia las familias inmigrantes que cruzan la frontera ilegalmente con niños, esa política se aborda directamente en la Resolución A178 que se titula “Alto a la intensificación e implementación de las políticas y prácticas migratorias que son lesivas a mujeres, padres y niños migrantes”.Esa política también fue citada el 7 de julio durante los testimonios en la audiencia conjunta sobre inmigración.El obispo Juan David Alvarado de la Iglesia Episcopal en El Salvador, testificó en español con un intérprete al inglés para decirles a los comités los desastres naturales y humanos que la gente de su país ha sufrido, desde terremotos e inundaciones hasta la guerra civil. A los inmigrantes salvadoreños que buscan entrar en Estados Unidos los motiva la seguridad, la familia y la oportunidad, dijo él.“La política de tolerancia cero en este país afecta grandemente a la región de América Central”, expresó Alvarado en apoyo a la Resolución C033.Varias personas pidieron que el lenguaje de las resoluciones fortaleciera el llamado a la acción o proporcionara más datos específicos acerca de la urgencia de estos temas. Otros dijeron que, sencillamente, era importante para la Iglesia asumir una posición.“Necesitamos una declaración global. Necesitamos esta declaración, afirmó el Rdo. José Rodríguez-Sanjuro, diputado suplente de la Diócesis de Florida Central.Él dijo que la mitad de su congregación, la iglesia episcopal de Jesús de Nazaret [Jesus of Nazareth] en Orlando, está compuesta de inmigrantes, y muchos tienen miedo. Contó de una reunión en su oficina con una familia, y el niñito llorando. El padre ya tenía una fecha de deportación y su madre tenía que presentarse más adelante este año ante las autoridades federales del Servicio de Inmigración y Aduanas.“Necesitamos una declaración que diga que estas familias son importantes para esta Iglesia” dijo él al abogar a favor de la Resolución C033. “Estoy perdiendo feligreses debido a la deportación. Denme algo que yo pueda usar para darles esperanza. Denme algo para reforzar el mensaje de que esta Iglesia les da la bienvenida, de que esta Iglesia los ama”.La Rda. Devon Anderson de Minnesota, presidente del comité de política nacional, concluyó la audiencia agradeciéndoles a los que testificaron y a las más de 100 personas que asistieron.“Gracias por las proclamaciones de esperanza y la posibilidad de que nuestra Iglesia ande por el mundo abogando a favor de los inmigrantes en nuestras comunidades”, dijo ella.Las deliberaciones de comités sobre las resoluciones están programadas para la mañana del 9 de julio.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él en at [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri.[*] Sigla en inglés de Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act. Ley para el Desarrollo, la Ayuda y la Educación para Menores Extranjeros. (N del T.) Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Las políticas del gobierno de Trump sobresalen en la sesión conjunta sobre inmigración Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tagslast_img read more

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Planchette Sheltered Housing / AZC

first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/785672/planchette-sheltered-housing-azc Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/785672/planchette-sheltered-housing-azc Clipboard Apartments CopyClient:ElogieUser:La Fondation des Amis de l’AtelierPartners:OTE IngénierieLabels:HEQ processCost:10,6 M€ for a work cost of 7,5 M€ TTCAzc Team:Grégoire Zündel, Irina Cristea, Valentine Jamet, Stefano LunardiCity:ParisCountry:FranceMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Sergio GraziaRecommended ProductsWoodHESS TIMBERTimber – GLT HybridEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreMetallicsKriskadecorMetal Fabric – Outdoor CladdingFiber Cements / CementsApavisaTiles – Nanofusion 7.0Text description provided by the architects. This project provides sheltered housing for frail, elderly residents with a variety of disabilities. The building comprises individual studio apartments, communal areas and medical consultation rooms for residents and out-patients.To understand the project one must understand the history of the site at 232 Rue de Charenton in south-eastern Paris, along the side of which runs a passage that can be found on city plans as far back as 1789, at which time it led to cultivated fields. Fraught with real-estate related tension due to the complex planning laws in Paris and the Bercy neighbourhood, the project took seven years to see the light of day. The site is surrounded by high buildings that cast their shadows, and cramped by a house on the corner whose owner refuses to sell. Nonetheless, the orientation is interesting and planning laws are moving in the right direction. To the north, on the Rue de Charenton, we were able to build to six storeys, to the south, at the heart of the block, up to three storeys.Save this picture!© Sergio GraziaAs with all historical urban environments, planning regulations left no flexibility in terms of defining the height, width and length of the building. The resulting volume faithfully transcribes the layers of restrictions: the minimal access from the Rue de Charenton, extending back into the block where it is calm and protected, gives a position between street and garden with, above all, a large part of it in full sun at the height of summer.Shaped like a bayonet, the site engaged us in an interesting architectural exercise. The urban restrictions combined with the requirements of the brief led us to consider the most efficient means of squeezing in the allocated 2,150 sq m. Following the planning laws, the resulting volume slips like a living thing in between the existing buildings – our pragmatic approach aimed to use every inch of available space.Save this picture!© Sergio GraziaOn the Rue de Charenton, the generous height allowances and the shape of the site led us to design volumes of surprising proportions, which fold along the roofline. On the Ruelle de la Planchette, the upper part of the aligning facade folds in, scrupulously following the volumes permitted.The smooth external skin faces onto the city. Generously proportioned windows, almost square, provide maximum light and transparency in all the internal spaces, a luxury in Paris. The day-rooms are arranged around two patios; their proportions were reconsidered in order to meet standards, as well as requirements for natural lighting. All the day-rooms are naturally lit, as are the circulation spaces. Planchette Sheltered Housing / AZCSave this projectSavePlanchette Sheltered Housing / AZCSave this picture!© Sergio GraziaApartments•Paris, France 2015 “COPY” Area:  2250 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ArchDaily Planchette Sheltered Housing / AZC Projects France Photographs “COPY” Architects: AZC Area Area of this architecture project Year:  Photographs:  Sergio Grazia+ 18 Share Save this picture!© Sergio GraziaThe height of the neighbouring buildings gives them plunging views over the site. With this in mind, every detail of the building was carefully studied to ensure that they fitted in and were pleasant to look at. In both the design and its realisation, we opted for a building that is sober and adaptable, conceived in terms of real-life usage over the long term. We took into account the possibility of future extension in the event of acquiring the corner house. In considering the ensemble of issues with regards to health and thermal and acoustic comfort, we gave great importance to user needs.The first consideration regarded contact with the outside world. The quality of the envelope and exterior openings is essential in ensuring the quality of a building. Large windows create a relationship between the internal spaces and the city and neighbourhood. The second consideration concerned opportunities for interaction within the building. We strove for transparency at the heart of the site, for the quality of the communal and circulation spaces, which are designed as largely glazed walkways providing opportunities for residents to see, meet and interact with one another. These circulation spaces are a determining factor in the quality of life in shared accommodation. The third consideration took into account the layout of the different functions. The building houses several different functions, as well as the private living units – communal areas, easily accessible spaces for activity and leisure, and work areas for the staff.Save this picture!SectionFinally, if the question of energy is fundamental, so, obviously, are questions of well-being, comfort and health.The relationship between the occupants and the city was one of our foremost concerns. On the ground floor on Rue de Charenton is the entrance hall, on the Ruelle de la Planchette is a service entrance, and between these two entrances, along the Ruelle de la Planchette, administrative offices, family reception areas, and part of the paramedical unit are located. Designing the circulation in bayonet formation enabled us to place large spaces at the heart of the block and small offices along the side street. At the centre, directly visible from the entrance hall, is the multi-use room and the two large activity and reading rooms.Save this picture!© Sergio GraziaLarge, central glazed areas, including the main patio, which is itself an ‘outdoor room’, help to maintain transparency throughout the ground floor. At the semi-basement level are the service areas, for maintenance, laundry and staff, lit by daylight. In the central zone, three large activity rooms are organised around the central patio, from which they receive natural daylight. We identified the areas where residents would spend the most time, such as the activity rooms and circulation spaces, in order to prioritise natural light. Areas that are used only occasionally, such as physio and psychomotor therapy rooms, are daylit from the sub-basement level.Save this picture!DetailRepeating the same configuration of circulation space for each floor of the building, we created an efficient means of arranging the various areas. We distributed the 26 housing units on the upper floors, feeling that ground-floor bedrooms would not be agreeable. The patios are places for contemplation, like Japanese patios. They are the points towards which views from the communal living areas are directed. Circulation ceases to be a ‘corridor’, instead becoming a ‘route’. One passes from one point in the building to another looking outside.Save this picture!© Sergio GraziaThe architecture seeks a duality in the choice and use of materials. On the city side, a neutral skin, discrete and timeless, is achieved using an external facing in high-resistance concrete, grey in colour, dressing the edifice for urban life. On the patio side, larch-wood cladding, which requires no maintenance, provides a welcoming appearance for the residents. Project gallerySee allShow lessCall for Ideas: Post-War Housing in SyriaIdeasEdmonton Infill Design CompetitionIdeasProject locationAddress:5 Ruelle de la Planchette, 75012 Paris, FranceLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share CopyAbout this officeAZCOfficeFollowProductsSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsParisFrancePublished on April 18, 2016Cite: “Planchette Sheltered Housing / AZC” 18 Apr 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsFaucetsDornbrachtKitchen Fittings – EnoWoodSculptformTimber Tongue and Groove CladdingMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenBlinds / Mosquito Nets / CurtainsBANDALUXPleated ShadesEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAWoodBlumer LehmannCNC Production for Wood ProjectsMaterials / Construction SystemsCaneplex DesignPoles – Tonkin BambooFibre Cement / ConcreteTegralFibre Cement Slate Roofing – Thrutone Endurance SmoothMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! 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Institute of Fundraising laud Kwik-Fit payroll scheme

first_imgKwik-Fit Insurance received the Payroll Giving Quality Mark which recognises and rewards organisations for making Payroll Giving available to their staff. The Quality Mark provides employers with a certificate and logo for signing up to Payroll Giving and Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards in respect of each employer’s employee participation rates. The Quality Mark aims to provide UK charities with sustainable income streams by increasing participation in Payroll Giving. Tagged with: Awards  27 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 3 September 2007 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Institute of Fundraising laud Kwik-Fit payroll scheme Kwik-Fit Insurance has been awarded recognition from the Institute of Fundraising following the company’s achievements in payroll giving. The insurance intermediary, which currently has over 950 employees, was awarded the recognition, initially at bronze level for the money given so far in 2007 by staff. This has been given a huge boost by the introduction of the company’s ‘donate an hours pay’ scheme which launched back in January to raise money for it’s Charity of the Year, Tak Tent. The scheme has so far raised nearly £20,000 for the Glasgow-based cancer support charity and has had an impressive uptake with over 600 hundred staff donating an hours wage. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Lucy Gower joins Clayton Burnett as Innovation Director

first_img  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 June 2013 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. She describes innovation as “about connecting people and ideas to solve real problems and spot opportunities for positive change. The hardest part is being brave enough to take action and do something differently.”Alan Clayton explained why Lucy is joining the consultancy, coaching and training company for the voluntary sector, which he and Ken Burnett founded.”Insight and creativity are only of value if something is done with them” he said. “The process of turning ideas and insight into action is called innovation and Lucy is the very best at installing innovative belief and, most importantly, action into dynamic teams. She adds an enormous skill set, experience base and highly driven attitude to our team. We are simply delighted she has decided to join Clayton Burnett.” Lucy Gower joins Clayton Burnett as Innovation Director Innovation expert Lucy Gower is to join Clayton Burnett as the company’s first Innovation Director.Gower had a background in fundraising when she established the NSPCC’s first innovation programme. As a consultant she has now worked for a wide range of charities and nonprofits in the UK and around the world. She aims to help them develop their creative thinking and innovation skills to help them achieve their charitable objectives.A blogger for SOFII, 101fundraising, and the Institute of Fundraising, she also works for 100%Open. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Ecclesiastical seeks charity nominations for annual 12 Days of Giving

first_img Melanie May | 11 November 2019 | News  609 total views,  6 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis35 Ecclesiastical seeks charity nominations for annual 12 Days of Giving About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Ecclesiastical has launched its annual 12 Days of Giving, and is inviting charity nominations for 120 grants of £1,000.Ecclesiastical’s 12 Days of Giving sees the insurance company split £120,000 equally between 120 charities in 12 days during December.center_img Tagged with: christmas Funding grants AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis35 Any UK or Irish registered charity can be nominated, and nominations will remain open until midnight the day before each draw. Draws will take place each weekday from 5 – 20 December 2019.The more nominations a charity receives, the greater the chance of them winning. The application form asks simply for details on the charity, the nominee, and the reason why they would like to see their nominated charity receive £1,000.Successful charities last year included Acorn Village, which used its £1,000 to help fund help life-enhancing activities such as swimming, sailing, horse riding, media groups, gardening and activities in its Creative Craft Centre, and Barking Mad Dog Rescue, which used the funds for a down payment on the purchase of its currently rented village house, which it will transform into a second, smaller shelter for its most vulnerable dogs.  608 total views,  5 views todaylast_img read more

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Women march for justice

first_imgWomen demand rights, March 26.WW photo: Liz GreenBoston — Despite temperatures hovering around freezing and 50-mile-per-hour wind gusts, the Women’s Fightback Network commemorated International Working Women’s Month with a militant march and street rally on March 26.From a speakout at the Park Street transit station, participants marched right through the doors of a nearby McDonald’s restaurant. They chanted, “What’s outrageous? McDonald’s wages!” among other slogans defending low-wage workers and calling for raising the minimum wage in Massachusetts. They also stopped at a military recruitment station to demand an end to U.S. wars of aggression.Then the march went through what is known as Downtown Crossing, where a few affordable shops used to be, but which are now being replaced with more expensive ones. This area is experiencing increased gentrification as is happening in other areas of the city.Outside the Boston School Committee.WW photo: Liz GreenThe marchers then went to the location where the Boston School Committee was voting for cutbacks by kicking 4,500 6th, 7th and 8th grade students off school buses and on to city buses. There they joined with close to 200 members of USW 8751 Boston School Bus Drivers Union, the Coalition for Equal Quality Education and others to protest the austerity cuts.Activists raised many concerns about safety for their children and their access to public education, but the committee voted unanimously to approve the cuts. One outraged parent shouted “Shame on every one of you!” as she stormed out. The racist cuts impact the Black and Latino/a communities most severely, and are part of the ongoing resegregation of Boston schools.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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A tragic anniversary

first_imgDecember 25 marked the 25th anniversary of the dissolution of the Soviet Union.Two historic centennial anniversaries will take place this year. Next month will usher in the 100th anniversary of the February 1917 Revolution in Russia, which started with a great demonstration of women textile workers on International Working Women’s Day, and which within five days overthrew the czar.Revolutionary upheavals continued throughout the czarist empire, culminating in October of the same year (November by our calendar) with the uprising of workers, peasants and soldiers, led by the Bolshevik Party of V.I. Lenin, that not only ended the monarchy for good, but overthrew the capitalist class and the entire land-owning aristocracy.In future issues of Workers World we will write more on the tumultuous events of 1917 that ushered in the world’s first workers’ state.For now, we take up what happened just 25 years ago and what it meant for the workers and farmers of the former Soviet Union, also called the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics or USSR.Since its birth, the USSR had fought to survive in a hostile capitalist world. Its greatest human losses came in World War II when Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union in the biggest invasion in world history. Called Operation Barbarossa, Germany deployed 4 million troops along an 1,800-mile front.After four bloody years, in which the USSR lost more than 27 million people and most of its industry, Soviet troops beat back Hitler’s armies, liberated Eastern Europe from fascism and planted the red flag on top of the Reichstag parliament building in Berlin.The U.S. suffered practically no physical damage in World War II. In fact, it emerged from the conflict with an economy that produced half the world’s manufactured goods. From 1946 on, the Western imperialists, led by the U.S. and Britain, started a new war — the Cold War — targeting the Soviet Union.Cold War and arms race take tollThe USSR was still struggling to rebuild and could do little for the East European countries now allied to it, while the U.S. pumped billions of dollars into Western Europe through the Marshall Plan, stabilizing the capitalist economies there. A huge arms race accompanied the Cold War and was meant to bankrupt the weakened Soviet economy.All these enormous pressures on the first workers’ state trying to build socialism took their toll on the Soviet system from the beginning. There eventually emerged leaders in the Communist Party who were desperate to accommodate to imperialism. By the late 1980s, two of these figures — Premiers Mikhail Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin — made concessions that allowed the imperialists to restore capitalism in Eastern Europe. They broke up the Soviet Union into 15 separate countries and turned over its state-owned industries to private ownership, both domestic and foreign.Many critics of the USSR who professed to be socialists welcomed these developments, hailing them as bringing a more democratic form of socialism. But they were sorely mistaken.What followed the pulling down of the Soviet Union was a full-blown counterrevolution. Foreign capital and corrupt former Soviet officials joined in a feeding frenzy to snatch up what had been state property, while the material conditions of the great masses of the people spiraled downward, out of control.Margaret Thatcher, the Conservative Party leader in Britain who attacked the unions there and gutted social programs, was the first to openly give imperialism’s blessings to the changes in the Soviet leadership when she said in 1984, “I like Mr. Gorbachev. We can do business together.”Once the Soviet Union was gone, Gorbachev got his “reward” by appearing in commercials for Pizza Hut. Quite a comedown for someone who led a country of 287 million people, but nothing like what the workers in the former Soviet republics were going through.Conditions under capitalismAverage life expectancy in the Russian part of the USSR was 70 years in 1991. By 1994, after the restoration of the “free market,” it was only 65. The total population actually declined for the first time since World War II as the death rate exceeded the birth rate. The free health care system was discarded, along with the dismantling of all the social guarantees for employment, retirement income, paid vacations and other advantages enjoyed by Soviet workers.Rampant alcoholism, drug abuse and prostitution reflected the desperation of millions who had been thrown to the wolves while “entrepreneurs” created profitable new markets in the trafficking of women and addictive drugs. Conditions in other parts of the former Soviet Union became at least as bad as in Russia, if not worse.During this period, Russia was considered a “friend” of the United States. Leaders like Gorbachev and Yeltsin, who went along with this vicious dismantling of what the workers had built, were embraced, no matter how venal and even buffoonish they became.It was only after Russia, now an openly capitalist country, was able to take back control of some of its vital resources, like oil, and consolidate a political and economic structure that put the interests of Russian development ahead of the demands of the imperialist banks and corporations, that the attitude of the U.S. ruling class changed. In the current period, conditions for the masses have improved, and even the imperialist media have to acknowledge that Vladimir Putin is popular compared to those who sold out the Soviet Union.Now, most of the U.S. ruling class establishment are openly hostile to Putin, going so far as to demagogically blame Russia for Trump. Maybe the incoming U.S. president thinks he can charm the Russian ruling class into opening up to the whole Trump empire of golf courses, luxury hotels and casinos. But that won’t stop the Pentagon from building new bases in Eastern Europe and moving more troops to Russia’s border.In future issues, we’ll write about the great revolutions that allowed the Soviet Union to develop into a world power despite all the efforts of the imperialists to crush it.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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