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Howard Stern Joins Jon Batiste & Stay Human, Cory Wong, Tim Lefebvre On ‘The Late Show’ [Watch]

first_img[H/T JamBase] On Tuesday night, radio host Howard Stern stopped by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in support of his new book, Howard Stern Comes Again.Prior to his interview, Stern entered New York City’s Ed Sullivan Theater as Stephen Colbert‘s house band, Jon Batiste and Stay Human, worked through Elvis Costello & The Attractions’ “Radio Radio”. Funk/jazz guitarist Cory Wong and former Tedeschi Trucks Band bassist Tim Lefebvre were also in attendance as special house band guests on the late-night television show.With The Late Show house band amping up the crowd, Stern walked beside Batiste and banged away on the grand piano. From there, Stern took the mic and led the band through a comical, impromptu song with made-up lyrics in promotion of his new book. Stern exclaimed, “I wrote a book. I wrote a book. It’s a very good book. I’m here to promote,” as the musicians laughed along with the audience.Watch Howard Stern’s appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert below:Howard Stern – The Late Show with Stephen Colbert – 5/21/19[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]Wong and Lefebvre also did some jamming together backstage. You can check out a clip via Wong’s Instagram below:last_img read more

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The Mattson 2 Share Music Video For Dreamy New Single, “Wavelength” [Watch]

first_imgThe Mattson 2 are steadily blossoming into one of the more notable family bands within the psychedelic rock scene. The emerging duo, who blend the groove and ease of psychedelia with the intense complexity of jazz, is comprised of twin brothers Jared (guitar) and Jonathan Mattson (drums). On Tuesday, the talented brothers shared their new music video for “Wavelength”, one of the songs set to appear on their forthcoming Paradise LP.Related: Khruangbin Announces Debut Performance At The Capitol TheatreThe video’s storyline follows the two brothers as they can’t seem to find one another after initially setting off for some afternoon ice cream. Ironically, the two have no problem finding the perfect musical groove with one another, as the song’s subtle energy holds listener’s attention thanks to its lively swing tempo and dreamy melodies courtesy of Jared’s guitar. The band even looks to expand on their style of performing on this album cycle, as “Wavelength” features lyrics while their recordings have mostly been instrumental-based until now. The lyrics don’t stick around too long however, as Jared eventually takes listeners for a ride with a fantastic guitar solo beginning shortly after the two-minute mark.Watch the new video for “Wavelength” in full below.The Mattson 2 – “Wavelength”[Video: Company Records]The Mattson 2 have spent the last few years expanding their fanbase into the jam and indie rock communities. After touring North America alongside emerging chillwave-rock trio Khruangbin last spring, The Mattson 2 find themselves back on the road heading into summer 2019 with scheduled appearances at Ohio’s Nelsonville Music Festival, California’s San Francisco Jazz Festival, and Colorado’s Telluride Jazz Festival.Fans can head to the band’s website for tickets and tour info for their upcoming shows.Paradise is due out on June 7th via Company Records.last_img read more

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Ernst Badian, professor of history emeritus, 85

first_imgProfessor Ernst Badian, John Moors Cabot Professor of History Emeritus, died on Feb. 1.After teaching in the universities of Sheffield, Durham, and Leeds in Britain, and at the State University of New York, Buffalo, he was appointed to Harvard’s Department of History in 1971, and was cross-appointed to the Department of the Classics in 1973. He became emeritus in 1998.Badian was one of the great historians of Greece and Rome of the 20th century. He was born in Vienna in 1925. In 1938, in view of the growing persecution of Jews in Austria and Germany, he moved with his parents to New Zealand. There he attended Canterbury University College, Christchurch, and received a B.A. with first-class honors in 1945, and an M.A. in 1946. He then transferred to Oxford University, in England, where he received another B.A., again with first-class honors, and went on to write his doctoral dissertation under Sir Ronald Syme; he later edited two of the seven volumes of Syme’s “Roman Papers.” His dissertation formed the basis of his first book, which remains his magnum opus, his “Foreign Clientelae” of 1958. This fundamental study of Roman imperialism in a period of crucial growth and transformation is still an unreplaced classic. Roman imperialism continued to be one of Badian’s major interests, and “Foreign Clientelae” was followed by “Roman Imperialism in the Late Republic” and “Publicans and Sinners.”Unusually for someone whose main field was Roman history, Badian was also a major force in Greek history. In particular, beginning with an article on the city of Alexandria published in 1960, he brought about a revolution in modern understanding of one of the main figures in the tapestry of ancient history: Alexander III of Macedon, often called “the Great.” Reacting against the hero worship that was still offered to Alexander in the mid-20th century, Badian forced historians to look again at the contradictory and confusing texts on which most knowledge rests, and to realize that Alexander was as ruthless as any of the Roman generals that march through the pages of “Foreign Clientelae.” Allied to Badian’s deep historical sense was an acute philological ear, especially in his mastery of Latin, and he was a superb stylist in his second language of English.Badian’s large output comprises well over 200 items, including six books and many notices for a basic tool of classical scholarship, the Oxford Classical Dictionary. He was also a formidable and sometimes devastating reviewer. Active in the historical profession in both the United Kingdom and the United States, he helped found the Association of Ancient Historians (1974) and the American Journal of Ancient History (1978). In 1999 he received the Austrian Cross of Honor for Science and Art.Badian leaves behind a wife, Nathlie; two children, Hugh and Rosemary; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.A memorial service will be held on March 22, at 1 p.m., at Harvard Hillel, 52 Mt. Auburn St.last_img read more

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Green building milestone

first_imgUSGBC Marisa Long, External Relations [email protected] About the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)The council is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for the nationthrough cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. With 79 local affiliates, nearly 16,000 member organizations, and more than 167,000 LEED Professional Credential holders, USGBC is the driving force of an industry that is projected to contribute $554 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product from 2009-2013. USGBC leads a diverse constituency of builders and environmentalists, corporations and nonprofit organizations, elected officials and concerned citizens, and teachers and students. For more information, visit www.usgbc.org, or Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. About LEEDThe LEED green building certification system is the foremost program for the design, construction, and operation of green buildings. There are nearly 40,000 projects in the commercial and institutional LEED rating systems, covering more than 8 billion square feet of construction space in every U.S. state and in 120 countries. Further, more than 11,000 residences have been certified under the LEED for Homes rating system, with more than 52,000 additional homes registered. By using less energy, LEED-certified buildings save money for families, businesses, and taxpayers. They reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and they contribute to a healthier environment for residents, workers, and the larger community. Rick Fedrizzi, president, CEO, and founding chair of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) that oversees the LEED standards, said, “The strength of USGBC has always been the collective strength of our leaders in the building industry. Given the extraordinary importance of climate protection and the central role of the building industry in that effort, Harvard University demonstrates a tremendous accomplishment and exemplary leadership through its 50th LEED certification.”(Click here to view a photo slideshow of some of Harvard’s LEED green building projects.)Harvard’s commitment to green building is part of a University-wide goal adopted by President Drew Faust and the School deans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent below 2006 levels, including growth, by 2016.“As a University, we have a special responsibility to confront the challenges of climate change, not only through academic research but by transforming the way we operate our campus,” said Faust. “By constructing more-efficient buildings and renovating older buildings to make them greener, we are reducing energy use, cutting harmful greenhouse gas emissions. and improving the teaching and working environment for our entire community. I want to thank the staff members across Harvard who partnered with faculty and students to reach this milestone.”In all, Harvard has more than 90 green building projects that have received or are seeking LEED certification. Energy models suggest that the 14 LEED new construction projects have delivered more than  $1.5 million in energy savings annually and a reduction of more than 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MTCDE) annually, which equates to an average reduction of 34 percent below industry energy standards.Since its first LEED Commercial Interior Pilot Project in 2001, Harvard has used the USGBC’s rating systems to advocate for sustainable design, to drive continual improvement, and to ensure accountability in building design, construction, maintenance, and operations.Design, construction, operations, and sustainability teams collaborate to reach environmental goals throughout the project development and implementation processes. In addition, as part of a focus on implementing “net present value” projects, the University’s Schools and units developed and approved a Life Cycle Costing Tool to prioritize projects that are both economically viable and environmentally beneficial.In April, Harvard announced a 10 percent decline in the University’s overall greenhouse gas emissions, including about 3 million square feet of growth, from its fiscal 2006 baseline. Excluding growth, emissions from baseline buildings have dropped 20 percent, reflecting energy supply improvements, efficiency measures, and the engagement of faculty, staff, and students in activities designed to change behavior.Harvard’s green building progress has been driven by widespread community engagement from students, faculty, and staff across many Schools and units. The approach includes several key elements:Comprehensive and aggressive Green Building Standards that apply to all capital construction and renovation projects. The standards, adopted in 2009, recognize the importance of process by including requirements for integrated design and building in occupant engagement, life cycle costing, and energy modeling. LEED rating system requirements ensure accountability.A central Office for Sustainability that oversees University-wide implementation of sustainability commitments. Occupant Engagement programs and initiatives help to build a culture of sustainability across Harvard, giving students, staff, and employees the tools and resources to creatively and effectively reduce energy use and conserve resources.Harvard’s Green Building Services team, an internal group that provides sustainable-building consulting, LEED certification management, energy audits, commissioning, services to measure implementation of energy conservation efforts, and knowledge management services.Harvard’s online, web-based Green Building Resource, an important tool that not only allows the University to publicly share best practices and lessons learned, but also helps to drive ongoing improvements in the Harvard community. About sustainability and green building at Harvard Additional background and online resources:Click here to view a photo slideshow of some of Harvard’s key green building projects.Click here to view case studies of Harvard’s LEED building projects.Visit the Harvard Green Building Resource for tools and resources.Visit green.harvard.edu and the Office for Sustainability for more information about Harvard’s commitment to sustainability.center_img For further information, contact: The Harvard Green Building Services team supports University Schools and units in efforts to design, build, and operate their buildings more sustainably. The team helps to identify opportunities for improving building performance and shares best practices across the University. Green Building Services staff members also meet with project teams to explain Harvard’s Green Building Requirements, to facilitate green building training, and to manage many of the University’s LEED certification efforts.The Harvard Office for Sustainability oversees the implementation of Harvard’s sustainability goals, aimed at saving energy, conserving resources, and reducing environmental impact. The office promotes change and innovation by partnering with Harvard’s Schools and departments to foster a culture of sustainability and to use the campus as a living laboratory for innovation. The office draws together faculty, students, and staff to share best practices and to develop new programs, policies, and procedures that serve as replicable models to inspire students and future leaders, while seeking to influence the higher education, government, and business sectors. CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Aug. 1, 2011 — In a first for any higher education institution, Harvard University has achieved its 50th Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. The green building milestone includes six platinum-level projects and represents more than 1.5 million square feet of labs, dormitories, libraries, classrooms, and offices. An additional 3 million square feet of space is registered and pursuing LEED certification. Harvard University Public Affairs & CommunicationsColin Durrant, Manager of Sustainability [email protected]last_img read more

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Harvard endowment posts big investment gain

first_imgHarvard University’s endowment earned 21.4 percent on its investments for the year ended June 30, roughly in line with the financial performance of other large funds, the school’s money managers reported yesterday.The Harvard endowment, the nation’s largest, grew by about $4.6 billion to $32 billion over the school’s fiscal year.The fund also contributed an estimated $1.5 billion to the university, covering about a third of Harvard’s operating budgets for the year…Read more here:last_img read more

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Cohen named dean of Radcliffe

first_imgLizabeth Cohen, an eminent scholar of 20th-century American social and political history and interim dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study since last July, has been named dean, Harvard President Drew Faust announced today.“Liz Cohen is a distinguished and imaginative scholar with a deep knowledge of Radcliffe and Harvard and a strong dedication to Radcliffe’s pursuit of new ideas and collaborations across the academic disciplines, the professions, and the creative arts,” said Faust in announcing the appointment. “She is an experienced academic leader with a talent for nurturing creativity and spurring cooperative effort, and as interim dean she has already strengthened Radcliffe’s ties to people and programs across Harvard and beyond. Her wide span of intellectual interests, her spirited curiosity, and her incisive intelligence promise to serve the institute well.”“I am thrilled to have the opportunity to lead the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study to further success in its mission to create and disseminate bold new thinking in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and the arts,” said Cohen. “In my eight months as interim dean, I have learned how much the institute has to offer — advancing the research of Harvard faculty and students, providing intellectual invigoration to our interdisciplinary fellows, sustaining the world’s preeminent research library on the history of women, and pursuing programs to share this wealth of new knowledge with wider audiences close to home and increasingly around the world.“I like to think of Radcliffe as Harvard’s front door — open and welcoming to all who seek intellectual nourishment and creative inspiration.”Cohen joined the Harvard faculty in 1997 as a professor of history and was appointed the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies in 1999. Since coming to Harvard, she has served in a variety of academic leadership roles, including chair of the History Department, director of the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, and co-chair of the Common Spaces Steering Committee. She co-chaired the Harvard College Curricular Review’s working group on pedagogy in 2003-04, and she served on the Harvard Task Force on Women Faculty in 2005. She was a Radcliffe fellow in 2001-02.Much of Cohen’s influential scholarship has probed the connections between Americans’ social and cultural experiences and their political orientations over the course of the 20th century. Her writings range widely from urban, social, and political history to popular culture and the built environment.She is the author of “Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919–1939,” which won the Bancroft Prize in American History and the Philip Taft Labor History Book Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Her book “A Consumers’ Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America” explores how an economy of mass consumption shaped social life, culture, and politics following World War II. She has published widely in leading history and urban studies journals, and her writings have also appeared in edited collections and such popular venues as The New York Times, the Washington Post, The American Prospect, and the Boston Herald.With David Kennedy, Cohen is co-author of a widely used U.S. history college textbook, “The American Pageant,” now in its 15th edition. Cohen’s current book project, “Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age,” considers the benefits and costs of strategies to rebuild U.S. cities through the life and career of urban redeveloper Edward J. Logue.Cohen received her undergraduate degree from Princeton and her M.A. and Ph.D. in American history from the University of California, Berkeley. She served on the faculties of New York University (1992-97) and Carnegie Mellon University (1986-92) before coming to Harvard. Besides her Harvard appointments in history and at Radcliffe, she is an affiliated professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design in Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, a core faculty member of the Real Estate Academic Initiative, and a member of the higher degree committees for the programs in the history of American civilization and in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning.A longtime member of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Standing Committee on Women, she has additionally served on the Tanner Lectures Committee, the Social Sciences Chairs Council, the History Department Planning Committee, the FAS Resources Committee, the FAS Faculty Council, and administrative committees for the Charles Warren Center and the Center for History and Economics.Cohen’s teaching has ranged widely from survey courses of post-World War II America to more-focused classes on topics such as Boston’s urban history.Cohen has been awarded fellowships by the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies. In 2001, she served as president of the Urban History Association. During the 2007-08 academic year, she visited Oxford as the Harold Vyvyan Harmsworth Professor of American History.In a letter announcing the appointment, Faust expressed her gratitude “to the many people who offered advice on the search and, especially, to the 14-member faculty advisory group, whose insights were invaluable to the process.”“The Radcliffe Institute was my first Harvard home,” she wrote, “and I know from experience what an important role it has to play — within and beyond the University — as a hub for innovative and influential scholarship and as a crossroads for thinkers and practitioners from different domains. I hope you will join in welcoming Liz Cohen as Radcliffe’s dean and in helping the institute fulfill its vital role in the world of ideas.”last_img read more

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Ebola genomes sequenced

first_imgResponding rapidly to the deadly outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute and Harvard University, working with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and researchers elsewhere, has sequenced and analyzed many Ebola virus genomes. Their findings could have important implications for rapid field diagnostic tests.The researchers hope their results will speed up scientific understanding of the epidemic and assist global efforts to contain it.The researchers sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes collected from 78 Ebola patients in Sierra Leone during the first 24 days of the outbreak. (Some patients contributed samples more than once, allowing researchers a clearer view into how the virus can change in a single individual over the course of infection.) The team found more than 300 genetic changes that make the 2014 Ebola virus genomes distinct from the viral genomes tied to previous outbreaks. They also found sequence variations indicating that the present outbreak started from a single introduction into humans, subsequently spreading from person to person over many months.The variations they identified were frequently in parts of the genome that encode proteins. Some of the variation detected may affect the primers, or starting points for DNA synthesis, used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic tests, emphasizing the importance of genomic surveillance and the need for vigilance. The researchers reported their results online today in the journal Science.“By making the data immediately available to the community, we hope to accelerate response efforts,” said co-senior author Pardis Sabeti, a senior associate member at the Broad Institute and an associate professor at Harvard University. File photo Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerTo accelerate response efforts, the research team released the full-length sequences on the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s DNA sequence database in advance of publication, making the data available to the global scientific community.“By making the data immediately available to the community, we hope to accelerate response efforts,” said co-senior author Pardis Sabeti, a senior associate member at the Broad Institute and an associate professor at Harvard University. “Upon releasing our first batch of Ebola sequences in June, some of the world’s leading epidemic specialists contacted us, and many of them are now also actively working on the data. We were honored and encouraged. A spirit of international and multidisciplinary collaboration is needed to quickly shed light on the ongoing outbreak.”The 2014 Zaire Ebola virus outbreak is unprecedented both in its size and in its emergence in populated areas. Previous outbreaks had been localized mostly to sparsely populated regions of Middle Africa, with the largest outbreak reporting 318 cases in 1976. The present outbreak has manifested in more densely populated West Africa. Since it was first reported in Guinea in March, 2,127 cases have been reported, with 1,145 deaths, as of the end of last month.Augustine Goba, director of the Lassa Laboratory at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone and a co-first author of the paper, identified the first EVD case in Sierra Leone using PCR-based diagnostics.“We established surveillance for Ebola well ahead of the disease’s spread into Sierra Leone and began retrospective screening for the disease on samples as far back as January of this year,” said Goba. “This was possible because of our longstanding work to diagnose and study another deadly disease, Lassa fever. We could thus identify cases and trace the Ebola virus spread as soon as it entered our country.”The research team increased the amount of genomic data available on the Ebola virus fourfold, and used the “deep sequencing” technique, in which sequencing is repeated often enough to generate high confidence in the results, on all available samples. The researchers sequenced at a depth of 2,000 times on average for each Ebola genome to get an extremely close-up view. This allowed them to detect multiple mutations that alter protein sequences — potential targets for future diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies.The Ebola strains responsible for the current outbreak likely have a common ancestor, dating back to the first recorded outbreak in 1976. The researchers also traced the transmission path and evolutionary relationships of the samples, revealing that the lineage responsible for the current outbreak diverged from the Middle African version of the virus in the last decade and was spread from Guinea to Sierra Leone by 12 people who had attended the same funeral.The team’s catalog of 395 mutations (more than 340 that distinguish the current outbreak from previous ones, and more than 50 in the West African outbreak) may serve as a starting point for other research groups.“We’ve uncovered more than 300 genetic clues about what sets this outbreak apart from previous outbreaks,” said Stephen Gire, a research scientist in the Sabeti lab at the Broad Institute and Harvard. “Although we don’t know whether these differences are related to the severity of the current outbreak, by sharing these data with the research community, we hope to speed up our understanding of this epidemic and support global efforts to contain it.”“There is an extraordinary battle still ahead, and we have lost many friends and colleagues already, like our good friend and colleague Dr. Humarr Khan, a co-senior author here,” said Sabeti. “Providing this data to the research community immediately and demonstrating that transparency and partnership is one way we hope to honor Humarr’s legacy. We are all in this fight together.”The work was supported by Common Fund and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Science Foundation, the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, and the Natural Environment Research Council.Other researchers who contributed to this work include Kristian G. Andersen, Rachel S.G. Sealfon, Daniel J. Park, Lansana Kanneh, Simbirie Jalloh, Mambu Momoh, Mohamed Fullah, Gytis Dudas, Shirlee Wohl, Lina M. Moses, Nathan L. Yozwiak, Sarah Winnicki, Christian B. Matranga, Christine M. Malboeuf, James Qu, Adrianne D. Gladden, Stephen F. Schaffner, Xiao Yang, Pan-Pan Jiang, Mahan Nekoui, Andres Colubri, Moinya Ruth Coomber, Mbalu Fonnie, Alex Moigboi, Michael Gbakie, Fatima K. Kamara, Veronica Tucker, Edwin Konuwa, Sidiki Saffa, Josephine Sellu, Abdul Azziz Jalloh, Alice Kovoma, James Koninga, Ibrahim Mustapha, Kandeh Kargbo, Momoh Foday, Mohamed Yillah, Franklyn Kanneh, Willie Robert, James L.B. Massally, Sinéad B. Chapman, James Bochicchio, Cheryl Murphy, Chad Nusbaum, Sarah Young, Bruce W. Birren, Donald S. Grant, John S. Scheiffelin, Eric S. Lander, Christian Happi, Sahr M. Gevao, Andreas Gnirke, Andrew Rambaut, and Robert F. Garry.last_img read more

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Classroom to courtroom

first_img“When I first started, hardly anybody was going into immigration, but now I would say at least half our students want to go into it, if not more,” said Deborah Anker, director of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program at Harvard Law School. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerHIRC students work on all these matters with supervision. They also work on litigation and Circuit Court of Appeals cases, often filing amicus, or “friend of the court,” briefs, working side-by-side with the instructors.“They have done extraordinary work, especially with women refugees and with children,” Anker said.The last two decades have seen a tremendous increase in the numbers of immigrants being jailed, often for minor criminal offenses, Anker said. Because of their legal troubles, they face deportation to native countries they may barely know, often without the benefits of relatives who are long since gone.“The deportation policies in this country, the grounds for deportation, have expanded exponentially over the last 20 years,” Anker said. “I would say especially since 1996.”HIRC celebrated its 30th anniversary in June, marking the occasion with what Anker called an extraordinary conference that drew major national and international practitioners and scholars.Carrera, who has worked with co-director Nancy Kelly and HIRC for 30 years, said the cases are often so protracted that students who start a case end up handing it off to other students who will see it through to the end.HLS students can also join the clinic’s Harvard Immigration Project (HIP). Students run HIP with supervision and guidance from lecturer Phil Torrey, who also teaches a course on “crimmigration,” and works with students on clinical projects.The Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program has enjoyed a couple of major victories in recent months. In July, the First Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a Board of Immigration Appeals decision denying asylum to a Guatemalan Mayan Quiche Indian. The man had been a victim of racial and ethnic persecution by the Guatemalan military. And in August, the Board of Immigration Appeals recognized domestic violence as grounds for seeking asylum in the United States.“We have been trying to get them to formalize the law, include women fairly within asylum law, and recognize gender-based violence for over 20 years now,” Anker said.The program gives second- and third-year students great freedom to work on immigration cases, develop affidavits, and argue in court, Anker said.“We provide a lot of support and guidance, so they are not really stranded on their own, which is not appropriate from our point of view,” she said. “Because they get the intense supervision, they have an experience very different than when they start working at firms and NGOs [non-governmental organizations]. Our main goal is to educate the students.”In addition to learning the law, the students learn how to acquire and present evidence, work with interpreters, obtain documents and other evidence from foreign countries, interview, and work with experts.“When I first started, hardly anybody was going into immigration, but now I would say at least half our students want to go into it, if not more,” Anker said.The skills the students learn in the program are increasingly relevant to other areas of law as well, she said.Through the HIP project, first-year students have the opportunity for practical work in the immigration field, even though they can’t formally join the for-credit clinic at the law school until their second year.Some of the work the first-year students do includes bond hearings and helping eligible immigrants and refugees apply for permanent residence.HIRC gets hundreds of requests for representation every year so it can’t accept them all, Anker said. Greater Boston Legal Services gets several hundred more and takes more cases than Anker’s staff at HLS, because it has a broader mandate.“We take cases that are going to raise new issues of law,” Anker said. Harvard Law School students with the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program (HIRC) were working with Greater Boston Legal Services on a case involving a Guatemalan man in the summer of 2013 when they collectively had an “aha” moment.The pressure was high, and everybody was working on two sets of legal briefs that were due before the court. “We were having a meeting here, and all of a sudden everybody understood what was on the table, and the writing was very powerful,” said John Willshire Carrera, co-director of the HIRC site at Greater Boston Legal Services.The HIRC program trains students to represent refugees seeking asylum in the United States, as well as other immigrants, said Deborah Anker, the program’s director and a clinical professor of law.“We represent a lot of women and children, LGBITA [lesbian, gay, bisexual, intersex, transgender, and asexual] cases, and cases where people face persecution under what people may regard as the classic ground of political opinion,” Anker said. “Recently, we’ve been representing a lot of people who are fleeing the warfare — it’s called gang violence but it’s really warfare — in Central America.”last_img read more

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Creating pain-sensing neurons

first_imgAfter more than six years of intensive effort, including repeated failures that at times made the quest seem futile, Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) and at Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB) have successfully converted mouse and human skin cells into pain-sensing neurons that respond to a number of stimuli that cause acute and inflammatory distress.This “disease in a dish” model of pain reception may advance the understanding of different types of pain, identify why individuals differ in their pain responses or their risk of developing chronic pain, and make possible the development of improved drugs to treat pain. A report on the work was given advance online release today by the journal Nature Neuroscience.Clifford Woolf, co-director of HSCI’s Nervous System Diseases Program, led the research effort. Postdoctoral fellows Brian Wainger and Liz Buttermore are first authors on the journal paper. Woolf’s collaborators on the project included Lee Rubin and Kevin Eggan, both professors in HSCRB.The neuronal pain receptors created by Woolf and his team reportedly respond to both the kind of intense stimuli that are triggered by a physical injury and that cause “ouch” pain, and the more subtle stimuli triggered by inflammation, which results in pain tenderness. The fact that the neurons respond to both the gross and fine forms of stimulation that produce distinct pain in humans provides confirmation that the neurons are functioning as naturally developed neurons would, Woolf said.When the project began, Woolf’s team was attempting to create pain-sensing neurons from embryonic stem cells, but the task proved far more challenging than first envisioned.“We spent three years trying to recapitulate the developmental steps involved, and it turned out to be a total bust,” said Woolf, who in addition to his HSCI roles is a Harvard Medical School (HMS) professor of neurology and neurobiology, and director of the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at BCH. But the effort to develop pain-sensing neurons was occurring at just the right moment in the evolution of stem cell biology, coinciding with the development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology, the ability to transform adult human cells into stem cells and then into other forms of adult cells.The project was the original effort of an ongoing collaboration between HSCI researchers and pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, and, said Woolf, “for the first three years it was a total bust. But they, like us, were in it for the long haul.”Describing the early days of the project as “hitting our head against a brick wall,” Woolf said that “we had a dogged kind of persistence,” and once the team began attempting to create the neurons directly from mouse and human skin cells, everything began to fall into place.“We took mature neurons from mice, and found transcription factors that hadn’t been described before,” Woolf said. Then, using five factors — including three previously undescribed factors — the team was able to transform skin cells directly into the pain-sensing neurons.Asked what kept him pushing through repeated failures to make pain neurons using different approaches, initially starting with human embryonic stem cells, Woolf said, “It’s really complicated, because there are many projects I do pull the plug on, when I can’t see any way out of it. Here, even though we experienced failure constantly, I always felt there was something else we could do that would advance the work. Whether it was worth this long haul, time will tell. I’m optimistic.“I think the ability to make human pain neurons for the pain field is going to be very important. Furthermore, our failure with embryonic stem cells led us to work with adult tissue samples, making the technology much more clinically relevant, since these are easy to collect [from patients suffering from different kinds of pain],” he added.Woolf noted that the pain-sensing neurons his team developed “beautifully model” neuropathies and hypersensitivity to pain experienced by some of the patients who donated skin cells to the project. “Many pain conditions are due to genetic mutations, and we can model those beautifully,” Woolf said.last_img read more

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Understanding Turkey

first_imgTurkey appears to be moving away from the path toward reforms that helped fuel an economic resurgence there in the early 2000s, a leading economist told a Harvard audience on Monday. Daron Acemoğlu, a native of Turkey who is the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said the likelihood of Turkey’s politics and economy becoming more open in the near future has faded.“I was guardedly optimistic as recently as a year ago that once you have the institutional reforms, civil society becomes sufficiently well-mobilized that wholesale reversals may not be feasible. I must say my guarded optimism is less pronounced,” said Acemoğlu,Acemoğlu offered his remarks as the keynote speaker in the inaugural event of the Özyeğin Speaker Series at Harvard’s Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies.The series is part of the Özyeğin Forum on Modern Turkey, initiated by the center this year to deepen understanding of Turkey and its relationship with Europe. The forum, which will include an annual lecture, was established through a gift from the family of Hüsnü Özyeğin, a leading Turkish entrepreneur and philanthropist, and a Harvard Business School alumnus, M.B.A. ’69.Acemoğlu has achieved international prominence for his work, particularly for his recent research into the causes of disparities in economic development across societies. His 2012 best-selling book, “Why Nations Fail,” written with James A. Robinson, Harvard’s Wilbur A. Cowett Professor of Government, argued that political and economic institutions that are accountable, efficient, and inclusive provide the underpinning needed for economies to succeed over the long term.In his talk, “Turkey: Growing Pains Under the Long Shadow of History,” Acemoğlu gave an overview of that theory and how it may help explain the challenges that his native country, which straddles Europe and Asia, has faced since the waning days of the Ottoman Empire. Acemoğlu said that the Ottomans had what he termed “extractive political institutions,” in which power was concentrated in a small group, and that left the nation ill-equipped for economic and social growth.He said that model was largely maintained by the reformers who took power as the Ottomans faded and by the leaders of the Turkish Republic after its formation in 1923. Although the shift brought some positive changes, “The Turkish Republic … is very continuous with the Ottoman Empire,” Acemoğlu said, citing a persistent concentration of power and economic activity.Acemoğlu said the striking economic growth Turkey underwent in the early 2000s was the result of reforms instituted by the current ruling party, the Justice and Development Party (AKP), along with other reforms mandated by the World Bank following Turkey’s 2001 economic crisis. But he said that with the weakening or reversal of many reforms, the pace of economic growth has slowed and political freedoms have diminished.Responding to a question later from the center’s director, Professor of Government Grzegorz Ekiert, Acemoğlu said that pressures from Europe — including for changes that could help Turkey pursue its bid to join the European Union — were “part of the ensemble of checks” that helped push reforms. But he added that Europe’s “turning its back on Turkey” likely accentuated its move away from reforms, even though he said internal forces were the larger cause.Acemoğlu said there are some grounds for hope, since the brief period of reform showed that even modest institutional changes could be “transformative” for the Turkish economy and society. “But I’m not sure at the moment whether it’s politically feasible.”last_img read more

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