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Accelerating flow of the Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

first_imgPosition fixes made at the British Antarctic Survey station, Halley, on the Brunt Ice Shelf are considered for the period 1968–82. These show an initial westward velocity of approximately 400 ma−1 rising to over 700 m a−1 by the end of the period. The data are well fitted by two straight lines. The first for 1968–71 has a slope 430 m a−1 in agreement with that found by Thomas (1973) for the period up to 1968. The second for 1972–83 has a slope 740 ma −1, a large increase sustained for up to 10 years.last_img read more

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USS Laboon Engages in PASSEX with Romanian Navy

first_img Share this article View post tag: PASSEX View post tag: europe Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Laboon Engages in PASSEX with Romanian Navy June 24, 2015 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy USS Laboon Engages in PASSEX with Romanian Navycenter_img View post tag: Black Sea Authorities The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) participated in a bilateral underway engagement with the Romanian Navy corvette Admiral Eustatiu Sebastian (F-264)in the Black Sea, June 22-23.The exercises are aimed at improving maritime capabilities and reassuring our NATO allies and partners of our commitment to the alliance and to their security.Underway engagements such as this are often referred to as passing exercises (PASSEX), and consists of a series of at-sea scenarios designed to enhance maritime capabilities among participating nations. They typically include tactical maneuvering exercises, passenger transfers, bridge-to-bridge communication drills, and simulated threat defenses with aircraft.USS Laboon, homeported in Norfolk, Virginia, is conducting naval operations in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe. The ship deployed from Norfolk on February 13, 2015.U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied, joint, and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.[mappress mapid=”16309″]Image: US Navy View post tag: Romanian Navy View post tag: USS Laboon View post tag: Navallast_img read more

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Union panel discussion cancelled as only one person attends

first_imgExperts speaking at a recent panel discussion on stalking and harassment at the Oxford Union were surprised to find only one student in attendance.The event, held on Tuesday, was due to feature experts on the topic, led by Jennifer Perry, who has worked on e-crime since 2005 and wrote the UK Guidelines on Digital Risks for victims of domestic violence and stalking in 2012.Among the other speakers was Dr. Emma Short, Director at the Cyberstalking Research Centre, and Harry Fletcher, a Parliamentary campaigner and ex-Assistant General Secretary of NAPO. Alys Key, a student at Somerville who was the only person to attend the event, said in a public Facebook status, “Sadly, due to a lack of attendees (I was the only person there), the event was cancelled at the last minute.“I managed to chat to the speakers (who were having conciliatory refreshments at the Union’s expense).“We ended up having an in-depth discussion about the problems facing women today in Oxford and beyond.”She told Cherwell, “I think that the low attendance was due to a combination of factors. Firstly, there’s the obvious bad press around the Union at the moment which might have led some people to think it wasn’t really an appropriate space for this discussion.“Then there was the organisation of the event itself; I only found out about it a couple of days beforehand from a Facebook Event. Only about 20 people had clicked ‘attending’ and looking through the names it was obvious these were all Union committee members.“There was also the Guild-Union garden party going on at the same time, and use of other rooms in the building meant the panel discussion was to be held in the TV room – somewhere I’ve never been before and which feels quite out-of-the-way.“When I actually found the event, I was the only person there and one of the speakers told me that they were going to have to cancel.”She added, “I don’t think the poor attendance necessarily shows anything about Oxford students’ views on sexual violence, though one does have to wonder how much the poor turnout was due to the Union’s reputation at the moment.”A spokesperson for the Union told Cherwell, “Due to a lack of uptake, the Union decided to reschedule the event for Michaelmas 2014.“This was agreed by all parties involved –we remain committed to offering platforms through which we can combat issues of sexual violence, both within the University and beyond.”This comes in a week where the OUSU Women’s Campaign has urged students wearing sub fusc for exams to wear a white ribbon, pledging, “never to commit, condone, or remain silent about violence against women, and to stand with the survivors of gender violence.”last_img read more

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Governor Holcomb to receive letter full of complaints about unemployment benefit hangups

first_img Twitter By Network Indiana – September 2, 2020 4 489 Google+ Google+ (Photo supplied/State of Indiana) The latest complaints about Indiana’s unemployment system are going straight to the governor.The group Indiana Unemployment Peer to Peer Information, which says it has seven thousand members, sent a letter to Governor Holcomb, this week, explaining their frustration.The group says people have waited up to 15 weeks for their unemployment claims to be processed.The letter points to slow responses, improperly trained workers, bad information, and a lack of accountability among its chief concerns. Facebook IndianaLocalNews Pinterest Governor Holcomb to receive letter full of complaints about unemployment benefit hangups Facebook Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleSen. Todd Young still bullish on new round of federal pandemic assistanceNext articlePete Buttigieg to begin podcasting on Sept. 9th Network Indiana WhatsApplast_img read more

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Green building milestone

first_imgUSGBC Marisa Long, External Relations [email protected] About the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)The council is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for the nationthrough cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. With 79 local affiliates, nearly 16,000 member organizations, and more than 167,000 LEED Professional Credential holders, USGBC is the driving force of an industry that is projected to contribute $554 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product from 2009-2013. USGBC leads a diverse constituency of builders and environmentalists, corporations and nonprofit organizations, elected officials and concerned citizens, and teachers and students. For more information, visit www.usgbc.org, or Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. About LEEDThe LEED green building certification system is the foremost program for the design, construction, and operation of green buildings. There are nearly 40,000 projects in the commercial and institutional LEED rating systems, covering more than 8 billion square feet of construction space in every U.S. state and in 120 countries. Further, more than 11,000 residences have been certified under the LEED for Homes rating system, with more than 52,000 additional homes registered. By using less energy, LEED-certified buildings save money for families, businesses, and taxpayers. They reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and they contribute to a healthier environment for residents, workers, and the larger community. Rick Fedrizzi, president, CEO, and founding chair of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) that oversees the LEED standards, said, “The strength of USGBC has always been the collective strength of our leaders in the building industry. Given the extraordinary importance of climate protection and the central role of the building industry in that effort, Harvard University demonstrates a tremendous accomplishment and exemplary leadership through its 50th LEED certification.”(Click here to view a photo slideshow of some of Harvard’s LEED green building projects.)Harvard’s commitment to green building is part of a University-wide goal adopted by President Drew Faust and the School deans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent below 2006 levels, including growth, by 2016.“As a University, we have a special responsibility to confront the challenges of climate change, not only through academic research but by transforming the way we operate our campus,” said Faust. “By constructing more-efficient buildings and renovating older buildings to make them greener, we are reducing energy use, cutting harmful greenhouse gas emissions. and improving the teaching and working environment for our entire community. I want to thank the staff members across Harvard who partnered with faculty and students to reach this milestone.”In all, Harvard has more than 90 green building projects that have received or are seeking LEED certification. Energy models suggest that the 14 LEED new construction projects have delivered more than  $1.5 million in energy savings annually and a reduction of more than 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MTCDE) annually, which equates to an average reduction of 34 percent below industry energy standards.Since its first LEED Commercial Interior Pilot Project in 2001, Harvard has used the USGBC’s rating systems to advocate for sustainable design, to drive continual improvement, and to ensure accountability in building design, construction, maintenance, and operations.Design, construction, operations, and sustainability teams collaborate to reach environmental goals throughout the project development and implementation processes. In addition, as part of a focus on implementing “net present value” projects, the University’s Schools and units developed and approved a Life Cycle Costing Tool to prioritize projects that are both economically viable and environmentally beneficial.In April, Harvard announced a 10 percent decline in the University’s overall greenhouse gas emissions, including about 3 million square feet of growth, from its fiscal 2006 baseline. Excluding growth, emissions from baseline buildings have dropped 20 percent, reflecting energy supply improvements, efficiency measures, and the engagement of faculty, staff, and students in activities designed to change behavior.Harvard’s green building progress has been driven by widespread community engagement from students, faculty, and staff across many Schools and units. The approach includes several key elements:Comprehensive and aggressive Green Building Standards that apply to all capital construction and renovation projects. The standards, adopted in 2009, recognize the importance of process by including requirements for integrated design and building in occupant engagement, life cycle costing, and energy modeling. LEED rating system requirements ensure accountability.A central Office for Sustainability that oversees University-wide implementation of sustainability commitments. Occupant Engagement programs and initiatives help to build a culture of sustainability across Harvard, giving students, staff, and employees the tools and resources to creatively and effectively reduce energy use and conserve resources.Harvard’s Green Building Services team, an internal group that provides sustainable-building consulting, LEED certification management, energy audits, commissioning, services to measure implementation of energy conservation efforts, and knowledge management services.Harvard’s online, web-based Green Building Resource, an important tool that not only allows the University to publicly share best practices and lessons learned, but also helps to drive ongoing improvements in the Harvard community. About sustainability and green building at Harvard Additional background and online resources:Click here to view a photo slideshow of some of Harvard’s key green building projects.Click here to view case studies of Harvard’s LEED building projects.Visit the Harvard Green Building Resource for tools and resources.Visit green.harvard.edu and the Office for Sustainability for more information about Harvard’s commitment to sustainability.center_img For further information, contact: The Harvard Green Building Services team supports University Schools and units in efforts to design, build, and operate their buildings more sustainably. The team helps to identify opportunities for improving building performance and shares best practices across the University. Green Building Services staff members also meet with project teams to explain Harvard’s Green Building Requirements, to facilitate green building training, and to manage many of the University’s LEED certification efforts.The Harvard Office for Sustainability oversees the implementation of Harvard’s sustainability goals, aimed at saving energy, conserving resources, and reducing environmental impact. The office promotes change and innovation by partnering with Harvard’s Schools and departments to foster a culture of sustainability and to use the campus as a living laboratory for innovation. The office draws together faculty, students, and staff to share best practices and to develop new programs, policies, and procedures that serve as replicable models to inspire students and future leaders, while seeking to influence the higher education, government, and business sectors. CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Aug. 1, 2011 — In a first for any higher education institution, Harvard University has achieved its 50th Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. The green building milestone includes six platinum-level projects and represents more than 1.5 million square feet of labs, dormitories, libraries, classrooms, and offices. An additional 3 million square feet of space is registered and pursuing LEED certification. Harvard University Public Affairs & CommunicationsColin Durrant, Manager of Sustainability [email protected]last_img read more

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Harvard Kennedy School announces 2017 Neustadt and Schelling Awards winners

first_imgAn eminent nuclear physicist and a pair of renowned social scientists from the University of Pennsylvania are recipients of the Harvard Kennedy School 2017 Richard E. Neustadt and Thomas C. Schelling Awards. The awards will be presented April 6 during a ceremony in Cambridge hosted by Harvard Kennedy School Dean Douglas Elmendorf.Ernest Moniz, formerly the U.S. Secretary of Energy and currently a fellow at HKS’ Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, will receive the Richard E. Neustadt Award. The award is bestowed annually to honor individuals who have created exceptional solutions to significant problems in public policy. Past recipients include Navanethem (Navi) Pillay in 2016, former Irish President Mary Robinson in 2015, former U.S. Senators Richard Lugar (R-IN) and Sam Nunn (D-GA) in 2013, William “Bill” Drayton in 2012, Paul Volcker in 2011, Alice Rivlin in 2009, Gro Harlem Brundtland in 2008, and Muhammad Yunus in 2006.Barbara Mellers, the George I. Heyman University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and Philip Tetlock, the Annenberg University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, will be presented with the Thomas C. Schelling Award, bestowed annually to individuals whose remarkable intellectual work has had a transformative impact on public policy. Past recipients include Stanley Fischer in 2016, William Nordhaus in 2015, Sara McLanahan in 2013, Amartya Sen in 2012, Esther Duflo in 2011, Harold Varmus in 2009, Daniel Kahneman in 2006, and Richard Posner in 2005.last_img read more

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Light years ahead

first_imgAuthor of “Longitude” and “Galileo’s Daughter,” Dava Sobel in her latest book tells the story of the female “computers” who worked at the Harvard College Observatory from the late 19th through the mid-20th century analyzing stellar data captured on a growing collection of photographic plates. Using complicated calculations, the women classified the stars, determined their brightness, and even discovered new stars, nebulae, and novae. Many of their findings led to important discoveries about the universe, and their work helped clear obstacles for women in science. The Gazette spoke with Sobel about her book,  “The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars.”GAZETTE: How did you first hear of this story?SOBEL: I was interviewing astronomer Wendy Freedman more than 20 years ago as she was working on a Hubble telescope key project involving the expansion rate of the universe. She mentioned the work of Henrietta Swan Leavitt as being fundamental to her work in the present. I had never heard of Leavitt. When I looked into her work I found out that Leavitt had been working with literally a room full of women at Harvard, which was a big surprise because Harvard in the 1890s was not really a place one thinks of as being especially welcoming to women. But the observatory was a separate institution with its own director and its own financial responsibility. It already had a history of women working there. That struck me as powerfully interesting, as well as the notion that the work these women were doing was really important.GAZETTE: How did the photographic plates collection at the Harvard College Observatory factor into the work the women were doing?SOBEL: The glass plates were central to their efforts. In the 1800s the Harvard observatory began photographing the skies, in particular stars and their spectral characteristics, using a technique that captured the images on glass plates. Photographing the stars’ spectra didn’t become possible until the very late 1870s thanks to the efforts of amateur astronomer and American scientist Henry Draper. His sudden death led Draper’s wife to give Harvard her personal fortune to carry on her husband’s work. Her support gave the observatory’s director, Edward Charles Pickering, a lot of money to do the work and to hire women to look at these photographs. That’s what made the Harvard group of women more like astronomers than computers: They had these photographic plates from which they then made genuine discoveries.Glass plate A3393, taken with the 24-inch Bruce Telescope in Arequipa, Peru, in a 180-minute exposure on Nov. 10, 1898, shows the Small Magellanic Cloud, a companion galaxy to our own. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerGAZETTE: Can you describe their work?SOBEL: A number of them were working on establishing a classification system for the stars — a taxonomy of stars, just the way animals and plants are classified as a way to get a grip on the natural world’s range of diversity. They had been given freedom in that assignment: “Here is the problem, you solve it.” Leavitt in particular was looking to make discoveries of variable stars and in the course of doing that she noticed a relationship between the brightness of a particular kind of variable star and the length of time it took to cycle through its variation — go from brightest point to dimmest point and back to brightest again. That observation remains the basis of the distance scale that was first used to figure out the distance to the very stars she was looking at, then to determine the size of the Milky Way. Eventually American astronomer Edwin P. Hubble used Leavitt’s stars to show that the Milky Way was not the sum total of the universe, that there were other galaxies beyond the Milky Way.GAZETTE: So her work really helped establish some fundamental understandings of the universe?SOBEL: Absolutely. Just a few years later Hubble showed that the Andromeda galaxy was a separate galaxy. And then he showed that of these distant galaxies, the ones that seemed to be the farthest away from us were receding from us at the greatest rates. And that too depended on Leavitt’s discovery. Her work had tremendous reach and it’s still used now.GAZETTE: Did she get the credit at the time?SOBEL: She absolutely did. Pickering wrote an announcement in an observatory circular that reached a much wider audience than just the observatory community. So he gave her credit there; that was 1908. In 1912 she published the work herself in the annals of the observatory, which was the official publication. So she got her own credit for making that discovery and in fact now many astronomers have started talking about her discovery, which for years was called the period-luminosity relation, as the Leavitt Law.GAZETTE: Can you describe the observatory’s relationship with Radcliffe and why it was so important?SOBEL: The Radcliffe students got instruction from some of the astronomers at the observatory. The students were also recruited to work there. Some of the most prominent, productive women on the observatory staff over a period of many years — Margaret Harwood, Henrietta Leavitt, and Arville Walker — were all Radcliffe alumnae.Author Dava Sobel. Photo by Mia BergGAZETTE: You mentioned Mrs. Draper. What I found equally fascinating — in addition to the women computers doing the work and making these important discoveries — was the story of the women who financed their efforts.SOBEL: Another thing that made this story so stunning to me was that not only were women doing the work, the money supporting them was coming from interested women. Mrs. Draper had been her husband’s assistant/partner. He trained her and she was really knowledgeable. She was determined just out of love to see his work done after he died. And she was independently wealthy, so she made that possible. She carried on a correspondence with Pickering for about 30 years while the work was going on. And you can see how much she understood. They have a technical discussion in their letters in addition to their ongoing friendship and general enthusiasm for the work. The other deep donor to the project was Catherine Wolf Bruce, who really didn’t have the sophisticated knowledge of astronomy that Mrs. Draper had, but she was sincerely interested and generous and gave money to build the big telescope for Harvard’s satellite observatory in the southern hemisphere. She also wanted to have Pickering help her identify astronomers all over the world whom she might help, which was an amazing concept and it was very much to Pickering’s liking as well. He had a generous spirit, gave a lot of his own money to the observatory, and helped Bruce set up that fund and reached out to astronomers encouraging them to apply for grants and aid from her. Then he read through all these proposals and advised her as to which ones were worthy.GAZETTE: Do you have a favorite character from the book?SOBEL: It’s easy to fall in love with Annie Jump Cannon. And like many people before me, that has happened. She is just so available because of her diaries. Here’s somebody who’s a lifelong diarist and her diaries are all there in the archives.Miss Cannon said she did not mind climbing up and down ladders to operate the 13-inch Boyden telescope and take her own plates of the southern stars. Courtesy of the Harvard University ArchivesGAZETTE: Can you describe her work?SOBEL: She perfected the Draper classification. Cannon inherited a system started by Williamina Fleming, who assigned letters of the alphabet to the various categories of stellar spectra. Cannon had to reorder the alphabet because of her own sense of the significance of the different spectral patterns. She dropped some letters and she put O at the beginning, so we come up with this O B A F G K M order of the stars which, if you take Astronomy 101, you will learn even now. She was so adept at classification she would get photographic plates that would have hundreds of those spectra on them, teeny little smudges, and she would be able to look at them and in seconds classify what group each star belonged to. She did hundreds of thousands of stars accurately and quickly and that made her world famous in her own lifetime. As they all were.GAZETTE: It struck me that she really devoted her life to this work.SOBEL: That’s another stunning feature here, the longevity in the job of most of these women. They did not leave. Some of them were there for 50 years.GAZETTE: What do you hope people reading your book will take away?SOBEL: I hope people get a true story about science in an age of alternative facts and terrifying anti-science sentiment in this political climate.last_img read more

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Where Influence Happens: From the Soaring Heights of Digital Transformation to the Deepest Depths of Storage Technology

first_imgThe best days at work are the days when your mind gets blown – literally. I had one of those days last week at Storage Field Day in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Over the span of four hours, I witnessed the power of our company in the raw. Three Dell EMC storage teams, ScaleIO, Unity and Isilon presented their product line and underlying technology advances to a group of influential storage experts who wouldn’t hesitate to take the presenter apart, should they sense weakness – literally.Talking storage The product presentations were held in the context of Storage Field Day, an event where IT vendors have the opportunity to showcase their latest product developments to a forum of very technical influencers who were hand selected for the technology, in this case, storage. This is not a sales or marketing event, but rather an expert geek-out where no deep technical question is off limits. Gaining the trust of this particular group is crucial for any IT vendor because the independent expert voice of each of the influencers carries weight with CIOs and IT decision makers who are leading their company’s Digital transformation agenda.Gaining trustTrust and mutual respect, at a deeply technical level, is built over time in expert discussions between top technical talent in the industry and at the IT vendor. Often times it’s not for the faint-hearted because discussions can get heated and passionate. Our Dell EMC storage teams knew that and came prepared for deep dives into ScaleIO, Unity and Isilon. Check out the Storage Field Day 13 video playlist on Youtube.Calling out a few of the videos to give a taste of the level of expertise in the room:Dell EMC ScaleIO Vision and Architecture with Erez WebmanDell EMC Unity Product Overview and Architecture with Pierluca Chiodelli and Kaushik GhoshDell EMC Isilon Introduction with John HarDell EMC Isilon F800 Performance with Anton RangEngaging with influencersEngaging influencers around the transformational work the ScaleIO, Unity and Isilon teams are doing, in the larger context of supporting our customers’ IT transformation journey, allows the teams to keep a finger on the racing pulse of technological development and to build trust on via the right conversations with the right people in an open and transparent way.Helping customersIT Transformation is the very first step on an organization’s digital transformation journey. For a company of any size, it means finding a trusted partner who helps them realize that this journey can be completed in steps, at the speed and investment level that is right for their business and, most importantly, that it helps to create a better experience for their own customers. For the IT vendor, it is a great responsibility to build the best possible IT solutions, beginning with the most advanced technology building blocks.Interested in IT Transformation and how your company fares on the IT Transformation Maturity Curve? Check out our IT Transformation podcast series, Luminaries – Talking to the brightest minds in tech!last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Announces New Restrictions To Combat COVID-19

first_imgCapacity Limits for BusinessesAll in-person businesses serving the public may only operate at up to 50% of the maximum capacity stated on the applicable certificate of occupancy, except as limited by existing orders to a smaller capacity limit.The same Stanford University study that collected cellphone data also noted that limiting indoor capacity can reduce COVID-19 transmissions. In-Person Extracurricular School ActivitiesVoluntary activities sponsored or approved by a school entity’s governing body or administration are suspended, but these extracurricular activities may be held virtually. This includes, but is not limited to, attendance at or participation in activities such musical ensembles, school plays, student council, clubs, and school dances.Our top priority is stopping the spread of this virus so students and teachers can return to their classrooms as soon as possible. Data from the Department of Health notes that one-quarter of the cases of COVID among school-age children have occurred within the past two weeks, increasing the need to keep children safe outside of school so that they can return to classrooms. MGN ImageHARRISBURG – The State of Pennsylvania is shutting down indoor restaurant dining, youth and high school sports, gyms and casinos part of new Coronavirus restrictions in the state.Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Rachel Levine made the announcement on Thursday afternoon.They say the new, limited-time mitigation orders, take effect at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday and remain in effect until 8 a.m. on January 4, 2021.In addition to the business restrictions, gatherings are also limited to 10 people inside and 50 outdoors. The state had already imposed restrictions on bars and restaurants, limited indoor and outdoor gatherings, mandated the wearing of masks, and required out-of-state travelers to test negative for the virus before arrival.Health officials have also begged people to stay at home whenever possible.Limited-Time Mitigation efforts announced today include:In-Person Dining and Alcohol SalesAll in-person indoor dining at businesses in the retail food services industry, including, but not limited to, bars, restaurants, breweries, wineries, distilleries, social clubs, and private catered events is prohibited.Outdoor dining, take-out food service, and take-out alcohol sales are permitted and may continue, subject to any limitations or restrictions imposed by Pennsylvania law, or this or any other Order issued by the Sec. of Health or by the governor.Multiple studies have found indoor dining to drive case increases and fatalities. A study by JP Morgan analyzed credit card spending of more than 30 million Chase cardholders and Johns Hopkins University’s case tracker and found that higher restaurant spending in a state predicted a rise in new infections there three weeks later. Additionally, research from Stanford University found that restaurants accounted for a significant amount of new infections while research from Yale University found that closing restaurants reduced fatality rates. Professional and Collegiate SportsProfessional or collegiate sports activities may continue in accordance with guidance from the CDC and the Department of Health.Spectators may not attend such sports activities in person. K-12 School Sports and Youth SportsAll sports at K-12 public schools, nonpublic schools, private schools and club, travel, recreational, intermural, and intramural sports are paused.The Pennsylvania Principals Association is recommending a delay to the start of the winter sports season. The surge in cases among school-age children increases the risk that asymptomatic participants will spread the virus at a game or practice, in the locker room, while traveling to and from events, or at team meals, parties or other gatherings. Entertainment IndustryAll in-person businesses in the entertainment industry serving the public within a building or indoor defined area, including, but not limited to, theaters, concert venues, museums, movie theaters, arcades, casinos, bowling alleys, private clubs, and all other similar entertainment, recreational or social facilities, are prohibited from operation.The CDC puts movie theaters and other indoor settings on its list of higher-risk activities for contracting COVID-19.center_img Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),I still don’t know anyone with the Virus these people are Crazy Outdoor Gatherings and EventsOutdoor gatherings and events of more than 50 persons are prohibited.According to a Yale University study, limiting outdoor gatherings was among consistent policies found to reduce fatality rates.The CDC states that medium-sized outdoor gatherings carry a higher risk of COVID-19 spread, even with social distancing. CDC notes that the more people an individual interacts with at a gathering and the longer that interaction lasts, the higher the potential risk of becoming infected with COVID-19 and COVID-19 spreading, and that the higher the level of community transmission in the area that the gathering is being held, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spreading during a gathering. Gyms and Fitness FacilitiesIndoor operations at gyms and fitness facilities are prohibited.Outdoor facilities and outdoor classes can continue, but all participants must wear face coverings in accordance with the Sec. of Health’s Updated Order Requiring Universal Face Coverings, including any subsequent amendments, and practice physical distancing requirements.According to a Yale University study, closing businesses like gyms was among consistent policies found to reduce fatality rates. Indoor Gatherings and EventsIndoor gatherings and events of more than 10 persons are prohibited.Churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, and other places of congregate worship are specifically excluded from the limitations set forth above during religious services, these institutions are strongly encouraged to find alternative methods for worship, as in person gatherings pose a significant risk to participants at this time. While this an incredibly difficult recommendation to make, particularly at this time of year, faith leaders must carefully weigh the health risks to their congregants given the immense amount of community spread of COVID-19.A new study from Stanford University and published in the journal, nature, used cellphone data collected from 10 U.S. cities from March to May to demonstrate that restaurants, gyms, cafes, churches and other crowded indoor venues accounted for some 8 in 10 new infections in the early months of the U.S. coronavirus epidemic.last_img read more

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Aladdin Celebrates 1,001 Performances on Broadway

first_imgJonathan Freeman, Adam Jacobs, Courtney Reed & James Monroe Iglehart(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Adam Jacobs Star Files James Monroe Iglehart View Comments Related Shows Before the people of Agrabah made way for Prince Ali in Disney’s Aladdin, the tale was one of many in The Book of 1,001 Nights. The story came to the stage with a Broadway opening on March 20, 2014, and the cast of the enchanting musical celebrated 1,001 performances with (what else?) a delicious cake! Stars Jonathan Freeman, Adam Jacobs, Courtney Reed, Tony winner James Monroe Iglehart and the company got together on August 7 to pose for some adorable pics (and enjoy the sweet treat). We ain’t never had friends like these, and we’re so glad to have them on the Great White Way. Congrats, Aladdin!center_img Courtney Reed Jonathan Freeman from $57.50 Aladdin View All (4)last_img read more

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