+123 456 7890 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway Mountain View, CA 94043

Clerics sometimes break the law in the pursuit of justice

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Michael Hartney says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 17, 2012 at 4:49 pm I think it is inappropriate for the clergy to wear their vestments when protesting. It gives the public impression that they are authorized to represent TEC and that the entire Church agrees with their political positions. That is not the case. TEC is as politically diverse as any other group in the country. It is fine, by me, if the clergy wears street clothes when protesting. That is their individual decision and some consider it to be Christ like. But don’t claim to represent all Episcopalians. We claim to encourage diversity – just not political diversity. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (10) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Clerics sometimes break the law in the pursuit of justice September 18, 2012 at 4:38 pm I, too, was a frequent member of the congregation at the Pentagon for the Pentagon Masses. We were all arrested for ‘making a loud and unusual noise’ in the Concourse of the Pentegon. The Councourse being, at that time, a publically-accessible shopping mall within the confines of the Pentagon. We even bought the communion bread from the Pentegon Bakery in the mall. It was stamped ‘Pentagon.’I do not agree that Episcoipal Clergy (Bishops, Priests, Deacons) should not wear their clerical vestments/collar/etc. when protesting an unjust law. We are making a public statement about the Church, yes … but so did Jesus. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET JOHN SCHAFFER says: September 17, 2012 at 1:39 pm I would say that if the clerics want to truly identify with those protesting, then shed the clerical garb, stoles, and albs that often gets attention and preferential softer treatment. Join the anonymous faces and voices and then you will have genuinely risked the consequences. I would also hasten to add that the Occupy Movement largely discredited itself due to its anarchy-driven public face. They may have had sympathy in some circles, but now their tactics, violence, and destruction to private property shows nothing less than a mob mentality that strains for any credibility. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Steve Norcross says: Michael Mornard says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Rev. Richard Aguilar, the Rev. Jack Stanton and Claudino “Tito” Rosario, a member of UniteHere Local 362 in Orlando, Florida, wait to be arrested at the May 8 demonstration in support of fired casino workers. Photo/Ari Romer[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Jack Stanton is a veteran of civil rights and Vietnam War demonstrations. But he went one step further in May when he volunteered to be arrested during a protest on behalf of casino workers fired for union organizing in Hallandale Beach, Florida.Other clergy, including Episcopalians, also marched in the demonstration. “I took the extra step of volunteering to be arrested because I thought it would call more attention to what we were doing, and it proved to be so,” said Stanton, 75, priest associate at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Miami. He was arrested along with the Rev. Richard Aguilar, another priest in the Diocese of Southwest Florida who since has left parish ministry to work as a union organizer. “We were a photo op.”Getting arrested is not something that appears on most priests’ resumes, but over the years a small, steady stream of Episcopal priests and sometimes bishops has engaged in civil disobedience as part of how they “strive for justice and peace among all people” in living out the Baptismal Covenant. More recently, some have joined the Occupy movement, which marks its one-year anniversary today. Others have been arrested protesting wars or environmental or labor practices.“I would say it’s been a steady but small presence throughout, from the anti-war days” of the Vietnam War era, said Mary Miller, who recently retired as coordinator of the Consultation, an umbrella organization for Episcopal peace and justice organizations, and formerly served as executive secretary of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship. “EPF was quite deeply involved with things like the Pentagon Masses.”During the Masses, small groups would begin to celebrate Eucharist in the main concourse of the Pentagon, she explained. “Inevitably, they would be arrested after they were asked to please leave and didn’t.”Civil disobedience is “part of our tradition … I think this thread has been in Anglicanism all along,” she said. “There are plenty of people who would argue that this is what Jesus was doing and teaching, and we do claim that. It has not since early days been the dominant thread in our history, at least not since Constantine, but the witness has always been there.“And it has always been challenged by the folks in charge at any given time,” she added, noting how Utah Bishop Paul Jones “was drummed out of the House of Bishops during World War I” for being a pacifist.Participating in civil disobedience is a matter of personal conviction by a priest or bishop, said the Rev. Brian Grieves, retired director of the Episcopal Church’s peace and justice ministries, including the Office of Government Relations in Washington, D.C.“I can’t recall that the church has ever said anything at General Convention about civil disobedience per se as a policy matter,” he said. “I think for many people in the church it’s a time-honored form of nonviolent resistance to issues of conscience.”“We’re not a traditional peace church, like the Mennonites or Quakers,” Grieves said. “But … even though there’s no official statement, I certainly do think theologically that there’s a strong argument to be made for nonviolent forms of resistance on matters of conscience and that the church has a strong tradition of that, even if it’s unofficial, and I think that’s part of who we are.”Powerful symbolThe Episcopal calendar of saints includes Jonathan Daniels, a white seminarian fatally shot in 1965 in Alabama after pushing a black teen to safety when a part-time deputy sheriff pointed a shotgun at her outside a store. Daniels had just been released from jail, having been arrested for participating in a voter rights demonstration.While Episcopal laity participate in civil disobedience, the image of people in clerical collars protesting and being handcuffed can provide a powerful illustration of the church’s stance on an issue.Since the Occupy movement began last September, hundreds of protestors have been arrested across the country. But the trespassing arrest of retired Episcopal Bishop George Packard,68, in his purple cassock during a Dec. 17 protest in New York drew particular attention as a symbol of support by some in the church for the movement.The symbolism of clergy being arrested “really matters,” Miller said. “It leads the rest of us to feel like we’re in good company and that we’re not alone.”“I think we remain clergy-dependent in some ways, particularly when it comes to public faces,” she said. “There still is an urge for the church leaders to speak.”Diocese of California Bishop Marc Andrus, 55, was arrested wearing his cassock in 2006 for blocking access to the federal building in San Francisco in a protest against the Iraq War.“I’m aware that a bishop is a very public figure and that by participating in a broader act of civil disobedience that I would be helping call attention to the issue in a way that some people don’t have the ability to do,” he said.“It was my thought that one has to be judicious about how often and for what reasons one engages in civil disobedience,” he added. “I’ve been in many demonstrations and rallies and protests and witnesses and vigils since then around a variety of issues … but I have not engaged in civil disobedience since then.”Being bishop “is a different order of ministry than a priest or a deacon or a lay person,” he said. “I am answerable to my diocese and to the larger church, but I am also answerable for how I use the political power, the symbolic power that has been given me.”“It’s more visible than that of a local congregation leader, and I think I have a responsibility to think through how I use that,” he said. “To always not use it is not a reasonable answer, it seems to me.”Andrus, who is part of Bishops Working for a Just World, said he was “delighted” by Packard’s participation in the Dec. 17 protest. “I would like to see more active bishops in addition to retired bishops take that kind of stand.”Several other clergy were arrested along with Packard, including the Rev. Michael Sniffen, rector of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew, Brooklyn, New York.“It really was unplanned, unpremeditated,” said Sniffen, who attended the Dec. 17 Occupy Wall Street rally and decided on the spot to enter fenced property owned by Trinity Episcopal Church, Wall Street, and risk arrest in solidarity with the Occupy protestors he had been supporting. “I still feel that I did the right thing and acted according to my conscience.”Since then, Sniffen has been involved in other local actions addressing economic issues. He joined about 30 clergy, including more than half a dozen colleagues from the Diocese of Long Island, for example, in protesting New York’s budget cuts during a hearing at city hall.Like Andrus, Sniffen said he saw his actions as part of his obligation as a church leader. “If I’m going to speak about something from the pulpit and not do something with my own person to try and transform that which is causing God’s people pain, that which is unjust, then I really have no business talking about it.”“It seems quite clear to me that the gospel comes to life when clergy are really engaged in all aspects of community of life and are not just talking about community life,” said Sniffen, 31. “Politics in this country is in such a sad state. Now more than certainly at any other point in my life it seems really important to speak up as a community leader as well as faith leader.”Living out the gospelStanton also said he saw his civil disobedience in biblical terms. “A main thrust of the Bible is justice and reaching out to the oppressed and the weak. I was taken by [the case of] these 10 workers because they are just about powerless, and they’re being brutally dealt with – not physically, but enough to cause dreadful harm to their families.”“Jesus in his own life went to the cross. It was doing the will of God as a protest of sorts. He was standing there and just taking it from Pilate,” said Stanton, who said he looked to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights protestors as an example of this. “They knew they were going to get arrested, but they weren’t going to stop because they knew they had the truth on their side. They took the punishment.”“To me … that is the witness of the Bible and of Jesus, and I think that in my own life I need to show that.”The Rev. Joshua Griffin is arrested in the Montana statehouse during a protest against mining and exporting coal. Photo/Rae BreauxThe Rev. P. Joshua Griffin, arrested in August as part of a protest against plans to begin mining coal at Otter Creek in Montana and to ship it to West Coast ports for export overseas, said he found support for his action within the church and its theology.“One reason I felt called to participate in this action was really because as a priest I am called to be obedient to the teachings of our church and to those that have authority and pastoral leadership,” he said. He cited in particular the “very powerful language” of the House of Bishop’s 2011 letter from Quito, Ecuador, urging Episcopalians to work toward climate justice and General Convention’s passage of Resolution B023 in July calling on the church “to resist the development and expansion of ever more unconventional, dangerous and environmentally destructive sources of fossil fuel and move toward conversion to more sustainable sources.”“I feel that my work in Montana and participation in this action was in direct obedience to this teaching of our church,” said Griffin, 31, priest associate at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church in Portland, Oregon, and former missioner for environmental justice in the Diocese of California. “I’m very excited that our official church policy is to resist these kinds of evils.”Civil disobedience “is a very old tradition in the Episcopal Church,” said Griffin, who also was arrested three times while working in California. He identified his mentor as his college chaplain, the Rev. Canon Henry Atkins, who once served as chaplain to the Black Panthers, worked to integrate Southern churches during the civil rights movement and hid Central American refugees at a New Jersey church during the 1980s.One reason he knew he had a home in the Episcopal Church was its commitment to the Incarnation and “incarnational politics,” Griffin said. “I knew that I was called to this kind of work, and I knew that it would be supported.”The Rev. Jim Lewis did community service working on a garbage truck after being arrested for protesting Iraq War funding. Photo/ Mike YoungrenThe Rev. Jim Lewis of Charleston, West Virginia, a long-time activist who will turn 77 on Oct. 1, has been arrested while protesting support for U.S. activities in Central America, supporting striking Virginia coalminers, protesting Iraq war funding, and helping immigrant poultry workers in Delaware. Ordained in 1964, he participated in civil rights demonstrations but didn’t become involved in civil disobedience until the 1980s.“I went to Central America and saw people who were being devastated by U.S. policy,” he said. “I came back here saying, ‘We need to change U.S. policy. We’ve got to stop funding this killing.”He got arrested in a congressional office in Michigan, because “I felt like something more was required from me at that point: putting my body on the line. … It wasn’t something that I felt was a better thing to do than I had done in the past. It was just almost a natural evolution for me.”Lewis said he’d like to see more clergy engaging in civil disobedience but recognizes not everyone is called to such action.“It does seem to me that there’s a time for clergy to step out there,” he said. “Not everybody’s called to do that, but I think some of us are.”“I don’t see it as any badge of merit. It’s not a God and country award. … I just saw it as another way to step up to the plate, if you’re called to do that, and to make your testimony. But I don’t see a whole lot of it in the Episcopal Church.”The challenge of nonviolenceLooking back, Stanton said he believed more clergy participated in civil disobedience during the civil rights movement.But civil rights activist the Rev. Canon Edward Rodman said, “In general clergy were not particularly notable … for their commitment to nonviolence. They were pretty good with civil disobedience, and I think that distinction you need to make pretty sharply. Civil disobedience really involved the willingness to be arrested. A lot of folks were willing to do that, but they were not necessarily ready to take a beating, and that is the real difference.”“There were many clergy of that era who were very courageous and who were not necessarily involved directly in the movement but who stood up and did courageous things, and so that is not to be discounted,” he said.Rodman, 70, has been involved in the Episcopal Church’s antiracism training and is John Seeley Stone professor of pastoral theology and urban ministry at Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.“Most of my actual civil disobedience and arrests occurred while I was in high school and college, not after I was in seminary and beyond,” he noted. “I was more of a trainer and adviser at that point.”And he continues in that role. “Here in Cambridge, we have a really wonderful group of old folks like myself who spanned the civil rights and the peace movements … We have formed a collective to try to help the younger anarchists and others to try to be clear on what is and isn’t appropriate in the area of civil disobedience and what kind of serious spiritual commitment you have to have.“I would say that the primary difference between then and now is the fact that this younger group really doesn’t get that,” he said. “It’s much more impatient, and – I wouldn’t say they’re fearless; the term I would use is that, because most of them are privileged, they don’t appreciate the degree to which oppression and violence can rain down on them if they’re not careful. And I think that some of them got that bitter experience in Oakland,” he said, referring to violent clashes with police during the Occupy movement in California.During the civil rights movement and the early days of protests against the Vietnam War, he said, “there was a continuum of … spiritual commitment to the discipline of nonviolence and the study of it and the training that went into it.”“Certainly the Occupy people, to their credit, did get the key lesson in any nonviolent social-change movement, and that is the notion of shared leadership,” he added. “It’s about the people who work making the decisions and not the star getting himself set up to get assassinated.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Rector Albany, NY September 17, 2012 at 4:45 pm I recall the witness of a number of clergy in the Diocese of Pennsylvania in the 60’s and 70’s in ways which shook me out of my assumptions about what it means to see law through the eyes of justice in theological way. It’s not me, but it did lead me to a much more mature vision of faith to strive to bear witness to as a priest.Regarding Jonathan Daniels, I see him mostly as an unlikely but very real martyr, taking the bullet meant for the innocent young woman upon himself. Adam Egan says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rob Godwin says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Sharon SheridanPosted Sep 17, 2012 Doug Desper says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem September 17, 2012 at 12:38 pm While I heartily approve of civil disobedience as a tactic, it doesn’t seem to be quite the right word to describe the actions of Jonathan Myrick Daniels and his companions, if it means not complying with unjust laws. Federal law had abolished segregation throughout the United States, but many jurisdictions in the South simply ignored the law. It was the forces of segregation who disobeyed the law, not Daniels. Daniels and others refused to comply with segregation, but in that it had lost any legitimate legal authority they weren’t engaged in civil disobedience, but trying to enforce what was already the law. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC September 18, 2012 at 10:25 pm Ummm…. how about “it’s illegal to fire people for union activity”? That seems to have slid completely by.And clergy should DEFINITELY wear their collars. More and more people see the Church as irrelevant, and if we want to engage people we need to dispel that image. October 3, 2012 at 9:59 am Have we removed Romans 13:1-2 from our Bibles?Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves.And here Paul was talking, not about a democratically elected government, but the tyrannical rule of the occupying Roman army. Stephen Voysey says: Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing October 8, 2012 at 7:25 pm Non Christians could care less that Episcopal clergy are protesting. Grow up. The sixties and seventies are long gone. Get back to baptizing and instructing how to be a disciple of Christ not a cool hipster in the park in handcuffs. God save us! Bill Dilworth says: Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ September 18, 2012 at 12:53 pm The issue here is the spirit. Standing in righteous accusation of others is intoxicating. There are times when social action has been warranted and even essential. But there is always this flip side that needs a good look. Social justice is mare exciting than nursing home visitation. One has to ask what is driving us in each case. Clergy also can be helpful inside these movements contending with their more immature members and dangerous excesses. The Occupy Movement would be a case on point. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rev. Paul Hartt says: Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Environment & Climate Change, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Occupy Movement Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Tampa, FL September 17, 2012 at 8:15 pm This article brought back strong memories, though distant, of my participation in a mass on the concourse of the Pentagon protesting the US involvement in Vietnam. I would not express civil disobedience in the same way today, but at the time I felt right in doing it.Many of us were arrested over the course of several days and weeks, and we were all eventually found innocent of the charge of disturbing the peace. Many ironies in that.I admire the courage of those who speak up, and more for those who are willing to walk their talk. Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed.last_img read more

Read More »

7 Expert-recommended Secrets To Having Youthful, Glowing Skin

first_img The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSAlcoholChemicalsDietExerciseExfoliatehealthSkin CareSunscreentips Previous articleAgrusa leaving Apopka Chamber in FebruaryNext articleWhy Keeping Track of Your Expenses Is Very Important Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 By Allen BrownYour skin is a reflection of you and your lifestyle. Of course, as you age your skin ages too, but don’t let this affect you as there are still plenty of ways and methods to keep your skin looking as good as it possibly can. Having and maintaining beautiful, glowing, and youthful skin requires time and effort, but like anything, if you put in the hard work on a daily basis, and you allow yourself some time every day to maintain a skincare routine, you will be rewarded in glowing skin that both looks and feels youthful. Below are 7 expert secrets to have youthful and glowing skin.1. Avoid Using Harsh ChemicalThere is enough pollution in our everyday lives so avoid polluting your skin even more. Treat your skin as a temple and keep anything you put onto your skin as natural as possible. Always ensure you read the packaging of any new products you purchase to ensure they are free from additives, chemicals, and parabens that may damage your skin, both in the short term and long term. A good example of a product that is free of harsh chemicals is natural goat milk soap, which due to its all-natural ingredients, will not dry out your skin and will only provide healthy and smooth skin. 2. Limit Your Time In The Sun And Wear SunscreenIf you have to be in the sun for any prolonged period of time, it is really important to protect your skin. Wear a hat and most importantly wear sunscreen/sun cream. This will protect your skin from the sun’s harsh UV rays. Exposure to harsh UV rays without suitable protection will leave your skin with sunspots and blemishes which will naturally age your skin, over time this will leave it looking washed out, dull and gray.3. ExfoliateOut with the old and in with the new is appropriate here. Removing dead and old skin will leave your skin looking fresh and healthy. Consider having a one-off chemical peel, or even a course or chemical peels that will exfoliate your skin, getting rid of all of the dead skin, blemishes, and imperfections that are making your skin look dry, dull, and old. Chemical peels are quick and can be fit around your daily life.4. Eat A Healthy And Well-Balanced DietAs the old saying goes you are what you eat. So ensure you eat plenty of portions of fruit and vegetables as part of a balanced diet. Eating healthily provides you with the acids and vitamins your body needs to keep your skin looking and feeling youthful and full of life. Cut out any unnecessary fat and fatty foods that your body can’t process. A little treat every now and then is fine but try to make a meal and calorie plan as and where you can to ensure you are getting the correct amount of calories and fat required.5. Treat Yourself To A Non-Surgical ProcedureThis is one of the most popular ways of maintaining youthful skin. Having a non-surgical procedure is non-evasive, and ideal if you have a busy life. This procedure is a  rejuvenating process that creates new elastin, hyaluronic acid, and collagen. Having this procedure, especially on your face, will provide your skin with the deep clean it requires.6. ExerciseTaking part in regular exercise leaves you feeling good and looking good. As you exercise you release endorphins which make you feel good. Your skin will naturally glow and look youthful when you have taken part in any form of exercise from running to yoga, this is because if you feel good on the inside then you certainly look good on the outside.7. Cut Down On Your Alcohol ConsumptionOf course, a little bit of alcohol is fine, but excess consumption will leave your skin looking tired and fatigued. So, decrease your alcohol consumption and increase your consumption of water. Water is fantastic as it will naturally flush out unwanted toxins from your body.Remember that it’s important to implement and maintain a daily cleansing routine from head to toe. Cleansing both your face and body on a daily basis and making sure you get plenty of sleep and relaxation will work wonders for your mind and body. Taking time out to look after yourself should be a top priority. All of the above secrets do work well on their own, but if you put them all together and create a healthy and balanced lifestyle and non-fad diet that is low in alcohol consumption, high in exercise, and high in self-care you will visibly notice the results. You will look and feel fantastic and fabulous, which will naturally radiate to your skin, leaving it glowing and youthful in appearance.last_img read more

Read More »

Scotland brush aside Fiji at Murrayfield

first_imgSunday Nov 15, 2009 Scotland brush aside Fiji at Murrayfield Scotland coach Andy Robinson got his career at the helm under way with a comfortable 23-10 win over the Fijians at Murrayfield on Saturday.It was coach Robinsons first match back in Test rugby after the disastrous end to his England coaching stint three years ago. He replaced Frank Hadden in June, and couldnt have asked for a better start after the comfortable win over the dangerous Fijians.“Very, very satisfied; I thought, the first 35 minutes, we were in complete control,” said Robinson.Phil Godman kicked 13 points, while tries were scored by Johnnie Beattie and Graeme Morrison. Fiji scored a try of their own just before the halftime interval through Vereniki Goneva.“They came back into the game and they got that opportunity just before half-time, which is a little bit frustrating, because it was the first time that they looked dangerous on our line,” said Robinson.“That’s what Test rugby’s about, to put more points on the opposition when you’ve got the pressure on.“We coughed up too many balls. We just made a few too many errors, gave a few too many penalties away – easy penalties to give away, which gave back the control to Fiji.“These are lessons that we’ve got to learn. This is the first step so we are not going to get carried away, there is a lot to improve on and the guys understand that,” he said.Scotland has tough matches against Australia and Argentina coming up over the next few weeks. Time: 04:29 ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueey30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Read More »

War on migrants continues unabated

first_imgWhile the courts quibble with the Obama administration on his November executive action, hundreds of thousands of workers continue to become casualties of the war on migrants.Last November, President Barack Obama announced a program that would allow the undocumented parents of children born in the U.S. to obtain temporary work permits so they could stay in the country with their “citizen” children. The legislation is currently stalled in the courts.But the war on migrants continues. This war has brought conditions so grave that the situation for immigrants today has truly become one of the great humanitarian crises of our times.Like the war on Black people, the attacks manifest themselves in many ways and demonstrate that workers are deemed expendable by the capitalist system.The global economic crisis is bleak for billions around the world. Racism and centuries of colonial imperialist domination make it even bleaker for workers of color.Immigration in the U.S.The issue of immigration has made the front pages since 2006, when Washington attempted to pass one of the most repressive anti-immigrant bills ever, the Sensenbrenner legislation.That bill was defeated by one of the largest upheavals of workers in decades when millions of immigrants and their supporters demonstrated throughout the spring of 2006.This was the beginning of a period of fightback, one when the migrant movement helped to revive the honoring of May Day in the U.S.Since then, however, conditions for immigrant workers have worsened.Currently, immigration in the media is handled like a hot potato, a topic to be tossed from one presidential candidate to another.Since racist demagogue Donald Trump made his disgusting anti-Mexican immigrant comment, there has been a nonstop discussion on immigration in the media with Trump disturbingly stealing the headlines.The reality for immigrants in this country is, however, very serious. No candidate of the capitalist parties talks about it genuinely.Two of the most critical areas on immigration policy today are, first, the mass detentions of millions of workers, including children, and, second, the horrifying human crisis of abuse and conditions that come as a result of the forced mass exodus of people who have left their homelands, particularly from Central America.The mass deportations of over two million workers under Obama should of course also be denounced.The mass exodus of workers from their homelands into this country and the mass detentions truly have led to a major humanitarian crisis of epic proportions.This is a global crisis as migrants from Africa, Asia, Caribbean, and the Middle East are forced to make their way to Europe. This year alone, almost 2,000 workers have drowned already in the Mediterranean Sea. (Missing Migrants Project, Aug. 3)Another ‘Trail of Tears’In the spring of 2014, immigration again made the front pages as a wave of unaccompanied children made their way to the U.S.-Mexico border.The vast majority of these migrants, many of them traveling in family units, were from Central America. Over 60,000 children and young people made the dangerous journeys from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras into the U.S.Little is said about the role of U.S. imperialism in forcing migrants to leave their homelands. In fact, were it not for the decades of intervention by Washington supporting reactionary regimes, and military attacks against popular movements, Central Americans and Mexicans would not have to leave their countries.Forced migration is big business. As the workers make their way into the U.S., they are prey for organized crime syndicates backed by the Mexican government. Money is stolen, women are raped, and people are held hostage until families in the U.S. send exorbitant amounts of ransom money. These are just some examples of the danger.No one would make that trek unless they had to.Once in the U.S., the detention of workers is also a lucrative business. Government legislation mandates that at least 35,000 beds be filled every night in prisons run by the infamous CCA (Corporation Counsel of America) or the prison company GEO Group, the same private corporations that unjustly incarcerate Black and Brown youth.This policy comes as a result of the U.S. providing more money annually “to border and immigration enforcement agencies than to every other federal law-enforcement agency combined, including the FBI and the DEA.” (New Yorker, April 27)Incarceration is exactly what happened to the beleaguered women and children of Central America who fled traumatic and violent conditions at home only to be rewarded with incarceration for their efforts to get their families out of harm’s way.As an advocate in Texas points out, whether it is organized crime in Mexico or the “GEO group, it’s a for-profit enterprise that makes its money by holding people in boxes until they pay.” (New Yorker, April 27)What happens in those “boxes” is exactly the same kind of inhumane and brutal torture that happens in prisons throughout the U.S.Several months ago, detained women and children struggled to get the word out about conditions in the new, so-called family detention centers that opened up in Texas to hold the unaccompanied children as well as some of the women migrants.The Karnes County Residential Center was built in South Texas by the GEO Group and holds 500 women and children. Thanks to the movement for immigrant rights, which listened to the cries for help, information came out that many women imprisoned at the detention center were accusing guards of sexual assaults. A federal complaint charged that guards were promising women help with their cases in exchange for sexual favors.Problems with food were reported. The air conditioning is turned up so high that the detention centers are commonly referred to as “iceboxes.”Conditions overall are so bleak that a professor advocating for these families stated in an Aug. 2 Migrant Clinicians Network publication: “The long-term damage on the mothers and the children is extraordinary. We haven’t seen anything like this since the Japanese internment camps in World War II.”The solution is solidarityWhat is needed to turn this situation around?Imagine the fear among the ruling class if the families of the over 2.5 million people incarcerated in U.S. prisons joined with the families of migrant detainees. Mass incarcerations of Black and Brown workers have become one of the solutions to the ruling class’s economic crisis. As police terror continues unabated against the Black community, as racist violence spews unchecked, solidarity is key to pushing back this offensive.The solution for the workers is to join hands across the border, through every prison fence and border wall, and fight back together under the banner “All lives will matter when Black lives matter.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Read More »

New student body president: ‘We will accomplish great things’

first_imgLinkedin ReddIt Watson edges Thompson for student body president ReddIt Linkedin SGA brings “politics to the table” with interactive event Website| + posts SGA Diversity Director promotes inclusion on campus TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summer printNew Student Body President John Paul Watson said he expects to accomplish great things next year.“I am excited to get to work and would not be here without the hard work of our campaign team and each student that supported us,” he said.Watson won the Student Government Association election by less than 60 votes, edging out Ryker Thompson. The final vote was 50 percent for Watson and 48 percent for Thompson, with 2 percent abstaining. Just over 3,000 students voted in the election.The rest of the SGA leadership lines up as so:Vice President of Operations: Kat KleinVice President of External Affairs: Kelsey RitchieTreasurer: Drew AtkinsStudents were also elected to represent their respective classes and colleges in the SGA House of Representatives. Here’s who will have seats at the table:Class of 2017 representatives: Aarika Novelli and Austin PerottiClass of 2018 representatives: Patrick Brophey and Sarah Neal SeacrestClass of 2019 representatives: Michael McCluskey and Will JezekAddRan College of Liberal Arts representatives: Benjamin Taylor, Christopher Sandoval, David Penn, James Lincoln, Julia Zellers, Morgan Williams, Taylor Sutton, and Yannick TonaBob Schieffer College of Communication representatives: Brooke Morrissy, Laine Zizka, Lance Owens, Lissie Kevlin, and Tamera HyatteCollege of Science & Engineering representatives: Abby Til, Chloe Miller, Connor Rodriguez, Irené Kwihangana, Londyn Bull, Morgan Bailie, and Rachel HoffmanCollege of Education representative: Delaney PaulCollege of Fine Arts representatives: Allison Armstrong, Allegra Hernandez, and David Lewis.Harris College of Nursing & Health Sciences representatives: Ashlynn Deaton, Charlee Bisch, Cole Givens, Eliza Stevens, and Katharine CarvalhoJohn V. Roach Honors College representatives: Abby Widick, Allie Strehle, Christian Tjoa, Justin Rubenstein, Landon Loyd, and Sara BabineauxNeeley School of Business representatives: Anh Nguyen, Brittany Fraser, Cara Doil, Caroline Pulliam, Conner Neal, Hien Tran, Hudson Trent, Kelli Pedersen, Kelsey Tow, and Nathan Walker Mackenzie Holst Mackenzie is a copyeditor and reporter for TCU360, mainly covering SGA and politics. She studies Journalism and Political Science and hails from Orange County, California. Mackenzie Holsthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mackenzie-holst/ John Paul Watson defeated Ryker Thompson to become the next student body president. TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Students open up at the Dear World College Tour Mackenzie Holsthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mackenzie-holst/ Twitter Twitter Facebook Previous articleWeekend Sports Round-up: April 15-17Next article#CLEANEATS: “Fresh Start” Smoothie Mackenzie Holst RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Mackenzie Holsthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mackenzie-holst/ Facebook Mackenzie Holsthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mackenzie-holst/last_img read more

Read More »

Another website blocked in latest of measures that threaten Web 2.0

first_imgReporters Without Borders condemns a military decision to block access to the Indymedia Istanbul (http://istanbul.indymedia.org) news website. The site has been inaccessible from within Turkey since 21 March. A message was posted saying it was blocked on the orders of a military court attached to general staff headquarters.“This decision is disproportionate,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Why block an entire site when the offending content could be removed? We urge the authorities to provide an explanation for this exaggerated measure and we ask them to take account of the freedom of expression of Internet users and their right to news and information.”The site’s staff describe the blocking as “just an attempt” to silence it by censorship. The Turkish authorities “have not yet learned that censorship is technically impossible on the Internet,” they said. They are continuing to post articles on the site using another address.Video and photo-sharing websites are frequently blocked in Turkey. YouTube was blocked for the third time this year from 13 to 27 March as a result of an Ankara police court decision because it had posted videos deemed insulting to the memory of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, who founded the Turkish republic in 1923. At least two other courts have tried to block access to YouTube since the start of the year. An Ankara police court ordered it blocked on 18 January because of a video of a similar nature. A court in Sivas followed suit on 25 January.The Slide photo-sharing website has also been inaccessible since 25 March as a result of the decision of a court in Crivil (southwest of Ankara) in response to “photos and articles considered insulting to Atatürk.” WordPress, the world’s most popular blog platform, has been inaccessible since August 2007.“Participative websites are more and more exposed to censorship because they are harder to control than traditional news websites,” Reporters Without Borders said. “These decisions by the Turkish authorities pose a danger to the future of Web 2.0.”The measures against websites are being taken under article 8 of Law 5651 on online publications and the fight against cyber-crime, which was adopted on 4 May 2007 and took effect in November. Websites accused of insulting Atatürk may be rendered completely inaccessible during the entire time required to conduct a judicial investigation. Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor Follow the news on Turkey April 28, 2021 Find out more TurkeyEurope – Central Asia April 1, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Another website blocked in latest of measures that threaten Web 2.0 Help by sharing this information April 2, 2021 Find out more News News to go furthercenter_img Organisation News TurkeyEurope – Central Asia RSF_en News Receive email alerts Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit April 2, 2021 Find out more Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism lawlast_img read more

Read More »

Ryanair to cut 150 jobs at Shannon

first_imgNewsLocal NewsRyanair to cut 150 jobs at ShannonBy admin – October 30, 2009 469 Advertisement Previous articleTwo days left for junior MRSC membersNext articleMcGahan and O’Connell both deny player rift as league breaks for internationals admin Facebook Email Printcenter_img WhatsApp Ryanair plans to cut the number of aircraft based at Shannon from four to one from next April. The airline says this will lead to the loss of 150 jobs and will reduce the number of its flights out of Shannon Airport by 75%. Ryanair had being threatening to pull services from Shannon, if the Government did not scrap its €10 travel tax.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The airline claims it has lost money on each of its last five years at Shannon.Today Shannon Airport Authority (SAA) confirmed that it is not entering a new five-year agreement with Ryanair, blaming the airline’s ‘unreasonable demands’ which they said were ‘unrealistic’.The Limerick Post understands that in the new deal, Ryanair has offered to deliver only 600,000 annual passengers at Shannon, as against the previous passenger numbers of two million.A Ryanair spokesman said the combination of the Government’s tourist tax and the DAA’s airport charges now makes Shannon uncompetitive.The airline’s current contract with the airport runs out in April 2010. Linkedin Twitterlast_img read more

Read More »

Foreclosure Timelines Pick Up the Pace

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Krista Franks Brock is a professional writer and editor who has covered the mortgage banking and default servicing sectors since 2011. Previously, she served as managing editor of DS News and Southern Distinction, a regional lifestyle publication. Her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications, including Consumers Digest, Dallas Style and Design, DS News and DSNews.com, MReport and theMReport.com. She holds degrees in journalism and art from the University of Georgia. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News Share Save Foreclosure Timelines Pick Up the Pace ATTOM Data Solutions RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report 2016-10-13 Krista Franks Brock Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Subscribe Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago October 13, 2016 1,690 Views About Author: Krista Franks Brock  Print This Postcenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Foreclosure timelines declined over the year in the third quarter, a first in RealtyTrac’s reporting history, according to the latest Foreclosure Market Report released Thursday by ATTOM Data Solutions, the parent company of RealtyTrac. RealtyTrac has been reporting foreclosure timelines since 2007.It took five fewer days to foreclose a home in the third quarter of this year than in the third quarter of last year, according to RealtyTrac, which reported an average foreclosure timeline of 625 days in Q3 2016.This momentous decline was “the final nail in the coffin of the foreclosure crisis,” according to Daren Blomquist, SVP at ATTOM Data Solutions.“The decrease in the average foreclosure timeline indicates that banks have worked through the bulk of the legacy foreclosure backlog in most states – with a few lingering exceptions – and that most of the foreclosures being completed now are relatively recent defaults that are more efficiently progressing through the foreclosure pipeline,” Blomquist said.Overall foreclosures have “been on a steady slide downward over the past six years, finally dropping back below pre-crisis levels in September,” Blomquist said in the report.Foreclosure filings were down 13 percent over the month in September and 24 percent over the year, reaching their lowest level since December 2005, according to ATTOM Data Solutions.Foreclosure filings actually ticked up 4 percent over the third quarter of this year, but they were down 10 percent from the same quarter last year, marking the fourth consecutive quarter of year-over-year declines.Foreclosure starts also followed a downward trend, sliding 13 percent over the month in September and 20 percent over the year to a more-than 11-year low. Bank repossessions were down 32 percent over the year and 12 percent over the month in September.A significant share of properties sold at foreclosure auction in the third quarter went into the hands of third-party investors, according to ATTOM. Forty-four percent of properties sold at foreclosure auction went to investors, breaking a pre-recession high of 30 percent in 2005 and higher than any quarter since RealtyTrac began recording data in 2000.Nationally, one in every 1,600 homes had a foreclosure filing in September. The states with the highest foreclosure rates were Delaware (one in every 680 homes), New Jersey (one in every 691 homes), Nevada (one in every 897 homes), Illinois (one in every 946), and Florida (one in every 950).While foreclosure timelines decreased over the year nationally for the first time on record, the time it took to foreclose a home increased on an annual basis in 27 states in the third quarter.The states where the foreclosure process takes the longest as of the third quarter are New Jersey (1,262 days), Hawaii (1,241 days), New York (1,070 days), Florida (1,038 days), and Illinois (942 days)—all of which are judicial states.States where foreclosures take the least amount of time include Virginia (196 days), New Hampshire (230 days), Texas (246 days), Minnesota (250 days), and Mississippi (253 days)—all of which are non-judicial states. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: ATTOM Data Solutions RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Previous: Following Suit: Prevention Activities Decline Next: SouthLaw Welcomes New Associate Attorney Home / Daily Dose / Foreclosure Timelines Pick Up the Pacelast_img read more

Read More »

Opportunity Zone Analysis Reveals ‘Dueling Trends’

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Opportunity Zone Analysis Reveals ‘Dueling Trends’ Opportunity Zone Analysis Reveals ‘Dueling Trends’ November 12, 2020 1,097 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News  Print This Post Share 2Save Previous: Americans Unhappy with Local Government’s Pandemic Response Consider Moving Next: Real Estate Investment Loans Pose Higher Fraud Risk Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily About Author: Christina Hughes Babb The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago 2020-11-12 Christina Hughes Babb The housing market is booming, even amid recent economic upheaval related to the COVID-19 crisis, but that holds less true in Opportunity Zones nationwide, according to a study by ATTOM Data Solutions, which collects and analyzes property, mortgage, foreclosure, and disaster statistics.While the report showed home price gains steadily climbing nationwide, prices are rising more slowly—or not at all in some cases—in Opportunity Zones than in the broader metro areas.The report showed median home prices increasing from Q3 of 2019 to the same quarter of 2020 in 74% of the Zones; in about half of the Zones, prices rose by about 10%.It revealed that markets in Opportunity Zones continued improving in Q3 2020, even as COVID-19 spread throughout the nation, damaging much of the American economy, ATTOM reported.However, the researchers added, “the price gains in Opportunity Zones fell below the pace of improvements in broader metropolitan statistical areas throughout the country: every metro area with enough data to analyze in the third quarter of 2020 showed year-over-year median price increases, while three-quarters of those areas saw prices jump more than 10%.Median home prices in 76% of Opportunity Zones were lower than the national median of $283,813. That’s roughly the same percentage as last year at this time. In about 36% of Opportunity Zones, the median home price is less than $150,000, also generally unchanged since last year at the same time.“Home prices in Opportunity Zones around the country continued rising in the third quarter of 2020, riding the wave of a nationwide boom that has defied the economic damage from the widespread Coronavirus pandemic. The increases point toward signs that some of the country’s most distressed communities have great potential for revival,” said Todd Teta, Chief Product Officer with ATTOM. “At that same time, though, prices remain depressed in Opportunity Zones, and a notable number actually dropped in the third quarter—a potentially very troubling indicator. Those dueling trends will be important to watch over the coming months amid a highly uncertain economic outlook.”The following are highlights from the report:Median prices rose from Q3 2019 to Q3 2020 in 74% of Opportunity Zones with sufficient data to analyze (see methodology in full report, here) and increased in 60% of the Zones from the second to the third quarter of 2020.In Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) with sufficient sales data to analyze, 89% of Opportunity Zones had medianQ3 sales prices that were less than the median values for the surrounding MSAs; 29 percent had median sales prices that were less than half the figure for the MSAs. Eleven percent of the zones had median sales prices that were equal to or above the median sales price of the broader MSAs.Year over year, median prices rose more than 10% in Q3 2020 in 890 (53%) of Opportunity Zones. Prices rose that much during that time period in 75% of all metro areas throughout the country.States with the largest percentage of Zones that had annual median price increases during the third quarter of 2020 included Washington (median prices up in 88% of zones), Missouri (88%), Arizona (86%), Ohio (83%) and Rhode Island (82%).Of all 1,737 Zones in the report, 629 (36%) had a median price in the third quarter of 2020 that was less than $150,000 and 313 (18%) had medians ranging from $150,000 to $199,999.The Midwest continued to have the highest portion of Opportunity Zone tracts with a median home price of less than $150,000 (58%), followed by the South (48%), the Northeast (41%) and the West (8%). Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

Read More »

Environment & Traffic Management In Jodhpur: Rajasthan High Court Halts Re-construction Of 50 Yrs Old Temple On Public Footpath

first_imgNews UpdatesEnvironment & Traffic Management In Jodhpur: Rajasthan High Court Halts Re-construction Of 50 Yrs Old Temple On Public Footpath LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK12 Dec 2020 12:08 AMShare This – xThe Rajasthan High Court on Thursday pulled up the Municipal Corporation of Jodhpur for its failure to ensure that no encroachments are made on public footpath, pavements and public way, etc. On noting that a new temple was being constructed on a public footpath, a Division Bench of Justice Sangeet Lodha and Justice Rameshwar Vyas fell one step short of instituting…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Rajasthan High Court on Thursday pulled up the Municipal Corporation of Jodhpur for its failure to ensure that no encroachments are made on public footpath, pavements and public way, etc. On noting that a new temple was being constructed on a public footpath, a Division Bench of Justice Sangeet Lodha and Justice Rameshwar Vyas fell one step short of instituting contempt proceedings against the concerned authority, after it was assured that the such construction will be stopped forthwith and the structure will be removed within 2 weeks. The Court was hearing a contempt petition filed by one Ravi Lodha, for non-compliance of orders issued by a division bench of the high court to the State of Rajasthan, Municipal Corporation, Jodhpur and Indian Railways in 2007. Thereby, the Court had specifically directed that Obstructions on roads in the form of poles, transformers, hoardings, cabins, installed some sort of structure to show place of worship of any religion, trees be shifted or removed. In November 2019, while hearing the present contempt petition, the High Court reiterated that Jodhpur Development Authority and Municipal Corporation, Jodhpur shall take all necessary measures to remove the encroachments made on the footpath, pavements and public way, by way of putting stairs, ramps, cabins, hoardings or fencing etc. in Jodhpur city within a period of three months. Rajasthan HC Issues Directions For Environment & Traffic Management In Jodhpur Despite these directions, the Bench noted that a new temple is being constructed on the land forming part of the footpath adjacent to the road. After a site inspection, the Bench was informed that the new temple is being constructed in place of an existing temple which was constructed 50 years ago, which stands verified from the inscription on the beam of the demolished temple. At this juncture, the Court made it clear that it does not matter whether the structure is being constructed at an old site since the same is on public land and the directions require the authorities to remove even existing structures. “Indisputably, while issuing directions not to permit the new construction including the sort of structures showing the place of worship of any religion, the specific directions were issued by this Court to shift/ remove the existing structure. Thus, assuming for the sake of arguments, that some structure alleged to be place of worship was existing at the site, the question of permitting any such fresh structure on the footpath, public way or any other public place, does not arise. It is not disputed before us that the alleged structure on the footpath is coming up without obtaining permission from the Municipal Corporation, Jodhpur,” the Bench observed. The matter is now listed for December 15, 2020 for further hearing in respect of compliance of various directions issued by the Court, disobedience whereof is alleged in the present contempt petition. The Petitioner has alleged that there was willful disobedience of the 2007 directions, whereby as many as 18 directions were issued pertaining to maintenance of roads, control of traffic, development of parking spaces, relocation of hazardous industries, removal of illegal encroachments, plantation of trees, etc. Allegedly, despite the aforesaid 18 directions, The sewerage system in the city had failed; Private buses were allowed to be parked in congested places of the city; No action had been taken against the owners of residential and commercial complexes who were using parking places for shops/godowns and other commercial activities; No Master Plan had been prepared for controling traffic in the city; There was an enormous paucity of officers and staff in the Department of Traffic and resultantly, home guards were being deployed to control the traffic without even extending them proper training. Interestingly, the 2007 directions had been passed by the high court in a plea filed by Lodha’s father. These directions had also prompted the establishment of Jodhpur Development Authority. Case Title: Ravi Lodha v. CS Rajan & Ors. Click Here To Download Order Read OrderSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

Read More »