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Turkuaz Harnesses Their Funky Side At Cleveland’s House Of Blues [Photo]

first_imgOn Friday night, Brooklyn-based funk powerhouse Turkuaz opened up their New Year’s run at Cleveland, OH’s House Of Blues. Brass-house trio Too Many Zooz handled the evening’s opening duties, as the venue was just shy of a complete sell-out. The trio helped get the packed house dancing and on their feet, setting the tone for the remainder of the funk-fueled evening.The nine-piece funk unit—comprised of Dave Brandwein (guitar, vocals), Taylor Shell (bass), Craig Brodhead (guitar, keys), Michelangelo Carubba (drums), Chris Brouwers (trumpet, keys), Greg Sanderson (tenor sax), Josh Schwartz (baritone sax, vocals), Sammi Garett (vocals), and Shira Elias (vocals)—got the show on the road with “If I Ever Fall Asleep”, before working through fan-favorites “20 Dollar Bill”, “Babies Makin’ Babies”, “Life In The City”, “King Computer”, and many more.Luckily, photographer Dani Brandwein captured some beautiful photos from the show, which you can enjoy below.The technicolor funk masters are gearing up for their New Year’s Eve “The Ball Drop” celebration at Worcester, MA’s recently remodeled venue, The Palladium. Too Many Zooz will once again handle the evening’s opening duties tomorrow, December 31st. Tickets for the show are still on sale and available here.For ticketing information and a full list of Turkuaz’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.Setlist: Turkuaz | House Of Blues | Cleveland, OH | 12/28/2018Set:If I Ever Fall Asleep, 20 Dollar Bill, Make You Famous, Digitonium, E.Y.E., Babies Makin’ Babies, One & Lonely, Coast to Coast, Life In The City, Lookin’ Tough, Feelin’ Good, Rule The World, Lady Lovely, The Question, Back To NormalEncore: King Computer, Bubba SlideTurkuaz | House Of Blues | Cleveland, OH | 12/28/2018 | Photo: Dani Brandwein Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Howard Stern Joins Jon Batiste & Stay Human, Cory Wong, Tim Lefebvre On ‘The Late Show’ [Watch]

first_img[H/T JamBase] On Tuesday night, radio host Howard Stern stopped by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in support of his new book, Howard Stern Comes Again.Prior to his interview, Stern entered New York City’s Ed Sullivan Theater as Stephen Colbert‘s house band, Jon Batiste and Stay Human, worked through Elvis Costello & The Attractions’ “Radio Radio”. Funk/jazz guitarist Cory Wong and former Tedeschi Trucks Band bassist Tim Lefebvre were also in attendance as special house band guests on the late-night television show.With The Late Show house band amping up the crowd, Stern walked beside Batiste and banged away on the grand piano. From there, Stern took the mic and led the band through a comical, impromptu song with made-up lyrics in promotion of his new book. Stern exclaimed, “I wrote a book. I wrote a book. It’s a very good book. I’m here to promote,” as the musicians laughed along with the audience.Watch Howard Stern’s appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert below:Howard Stern – The Late Show with Stephen Colbert – 5/21/19[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]Wong and Lefebvre also did some jamming together backstage. You can check out a clip via Wong’s Instagram below:last_img read more

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Candidates clash during first presidential debate, exchanging insults

first_imgAlysa Guffey | The Observer Hundreds of students gathered on South Quad to watch the first presidential debate live.Moderator and Fox News anchor Chris Wallace opened the debate with a hot topic at Notre Dame — the recent nomination of law school professor Amy Coney Barrett to fill the empty seat on the Supreme Court.Trump defended his swift nomination of Barrett as a responsibility to the American people.“We won the election, and elections have consequences. We have the Senate and the White House,” Trump said.He also cited liberal support for Barrett.“Some of her biggest supporters are liberals including from Notre Dame,” Trump said.Biden argued the seat should not be filled until Americans vote this November.“The American people have a right to say who the Supreme Court nominee is when they vote for the president. They are not going to get that chance because we’re in the middle of an election,” Biden said.As the debate shifted to focus on the ongoing pandemic, Trump and Biden clashed on both personal views on safety measures — including mask-wearing — and plans for economic prosperity. Biden condemned Trump for the number of deaths from the virus, saying the president “panicked” and did not listen to experts on the seriousness of the virus.Biden also took hits at the president’s refusal to accept the grim reality of coronavirus deaths, saying that when Trump was shown the numbers, the president simply said, “It is what it is.”“Well, it is what it is because you are who you are. That’s why it is. The president has no plan. He hasn’t laid out anything,” Biden said.Trump responded that Biden “could have never done the job [the Trump administration] did.”“If it was up to you, millions of people would have died, not thousands,” Trump said.An extended segment on race in America led to Biden calling Trump out for his protection of white supremacists in a 2017 riot in Charlottesville in addition to calling Trump a racist.While Trump did not condemn the white supremacists he called “fine people” in 2017, he attacked Biden for his treatment of Black Americans.“You have treated the Black community about as bad as anyone has,” Trump said to Biden. “You call them super-predators, and you’ve called them a lot worse than that.”The debate took a personal turn toward the Biden family as Biden brought up his son, Beau, who received a bronze star in the military. Trump proceeded to attack Joe Biden’s other son, Hunter, claiming he was dishonorably discharged from the military with a cocaine addiction and later received illegitimate funds from Ukraine. Biden responded that the Ukraine scandal was not true, and he acknowledged Hunter’s past struggles with drugs.“My son had a drug problem, but he’s overcome it, and I’m proud of him,” Biden said.Sophomore Anna Guzman described Trump’s attacks as “incredibly personal.”“Trump’s attacks were incredibly out of line, honestly, he is an embarrassment to our nation, especially after his performance tonight,” Guzman said.A common tactic the candidates seemed to share was an appeal to voters in Midwestern swing states such as Ohio and Michigan. At one point, Trump bragged about his contribution to the return of Big Ten College Football while Biden pointed out his contributions to autoworkers.In regard to the outcome of the 2020 election, Trump deflected to a skeptical stance on the legitimacy of mail-in voting.“If it’s a fair election, I’m 100% on board. But if I see tens of thousands of ballots being manipulated, I can’t go along with that,” Trump said.Biden said he would wait to declare victory until the election results are verified.After the debate, junior and co-president of College Democrats Emma Dudrick said she felt Trump derailed the night with his interruptions and personal attacks on Biden.“I think that Biden held his ground well, and I really appreciated his comments about the importance of voting,” Dudrick said in an email. “It felt like a direct appeal to the American public, not a childish attack.”Meanwhile, sophomore and president of College Republicans Adam Morys said he was not impressed with either candidate.“Biden didn’t present any good arguments, and Trump was interrupting too much. Trump will have more success if he stays more disciplined and attacks Biden’s policies,” Morys said in an email.The second presidential debate is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 15.Tags: Donald Trump, Joe Biden, presidential debate The highly-anticipated first 2020 presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden took place Tuesday with no opening handshake due to COVID-19 and several reminders to both candidates to respect the allotted time of each candidate.Throughout the night, tension rose as Trump continued to talk over Biden, who eventually told Trump to “shut up.” At one point, Biden called Trump the worst president in American history to which Trump responded that he had done more for the country in 47 months than Biden had done in 47 years.Trump, the Republican incumbent, stood by his campaign slogan of “Keep America Great” with his defense of a booming economy during his first term that he claimed overshadows the work of the Barack Obama-Biden administration. Democratic nominee Biden said he and Obama overcame a historic recession and handed Trump an uplifted economy.In addition to an economic focus, the candidates argued a range of topics from appropriate response to the coronavirus pandemic to the integrity of mail-in ballots to race relations in America.Originally, Tuesday’s debate was scheduled to be held on Notre Dame’s campus after the University announced it had won the bid to host the debate in a press conference Oct. 11, 2019. The University officially withdrew from the debate July 27, as University President Fr. John Jenkins cited health concerns and a diminished experience for students to engage in the political process as the leading reasons for the cancellation.Junior Francine Shaft said she was disappointed the University ultimately did not hold the debate as she was looking forward to it.“I think if they have football, they probably could have made it work, and I think they could have just limited the number of outside people that came in,” Shaft said. “And with the testing that we have, it probably would have been safe.”Instead, the debate took place at Case Western University in Cleveland, Ohio. Attendance was reportedly capped at 70, and all attendants had to undergo COVID-19 testing.Despite students’ disappointments on the change of location, hundreds gathered on South Quad for a watch party hosted by student government.last_img read more

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3 debt payoff tactics you shouldn’t use

first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Erin El IssaPaying off your debt is an admirable goal and a great move for your financial health. But some ways of doing it might hurt more than they help. Withdrawing from your 401(k), draining your emergency fund or ignoring your monthly bills in the name of paying off your credit card debt may seem like good ideas in the moment, but they can have adverse consequences in the long run.Dipping into your 401(k)There are plenty of reasons not to use your 401(k) to pay off debt, but let’s start with the potential financial ramifications. If you take money out early — that is, before age 59½ — not only will that money be taxed at your current income tax rate, but you’ll also pay a 10% penalty.If your 401(k) has a loan provision, it is a more affordable way of paying off your debt. However, 401(k) loans also have downsides. For one thing, any money you borrow won’t be earning a return until you repay it. If you quit or lose your job before repaying the loan, the entire balance will come due soon after. And if you can’t pay it off in full, it will be treated as a distribution — meaning you’ll incur the taxes and penalties of an early withdrawal. It’s a risky move. continue reading »last_img read more

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Local knowledge

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Holiday homes and battlefields: Legacies of the Korean War along DMZ

first_imgPointing to a faint North Korean mountain top in the distance, Lee, who was born and grew up in Haean, said his hometown was also used for propaganda: a 1970s government housing project combined every two homes into one to make them look larger — all of them facing north.Cheorwon county, 60 kilometers north of the 38th parallel, also changed hands after the 1950-53 conflict ended with an armistice.On a nearly empty road leading to a military checkpoint stands the concrete shell of a three-story building — once the regional headquarters for the North’s ruling Workers’ Party.”Where we are standing now used to be North Korea,” said tour guide Gim Yong-sun.Before the war, she said, the building was a site for questioning and torturing those accused of anti-communist activities.Now the tank treads left at the entrance by advancing South Korean and UN forces in October 1950 serve as a reminder of the brutality of a conflict that killed millions. From North Korean party headquarters to holiday homes to cemeteries, 70 years after the Korean War began its legacies line the Demilitarized Zone that marks where the fighting came to a standstill.A few kilometers from the DMZ’s eastern end, a small stone villa stands on a cliff overlooking the white sands of Hwajinpo Beach in Goseong, South Korea.It lay in the North’s territory before the outbreak of war, when it was the summer home of its founder Kim Il Sung, grandfather of current leader Kim Jong Un. Barbed wire fence Hundreds of North Korean troops who never made it home lie in a field outside Paju, the only cemetery in the South for enemy combatants.Many of the graves hold multiple remains, their simple granite markers saying only the number of they contain, and just a handful are named.At Panmunjom, the truce village in the DMZ with its emblematic blue huts, their successors on both sides come face-to-face.In recent years it has seen a series of summits bringing together the North’s Kim, the South’s President Moon Jae-in, and US President Donald Trump.But the armistice has never been replaced by a peace treaty, leaving the peninsula technically still at war, and inter-Korean relations are now in the deep freeze with nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington at a deadlock.At the western end of the DMZ, barbed wire fences surround the border island of Gyodong, less than five kilometers from North Korea.Barber Ji Gwang-sik was 13 when he fled Yonpek, his North Korean hometown, at the height of the conflict.It took “less than 30 minutes” for his family to travel across on a wooden boat, Ji told AFP, but for nearly 70 years he has been unable to return — even though he can still see Yonpek from Gyodong.Now 82, he still waits for the day he will be able to return.”Only those who had the same experience understand the pain,” he said. Next to the stony steps leading up to the villa — now a museum — is a reprint of a faded 1948 black-and-white photo showing five children, among them Kim Jong Un’s father and predecessor Kim Jong Il.Goseong county, along with a swathe of what is now South Korea’s Gangwon province, is north of the 38th parallel line of latitude where the US and Soviet Union divided the peninsula after Japan’s surrender ended the Second World War and its colonial rule over Korea.Surrounded by mountain ridges, the peaceful farming village of Haean was the site of some of the most fierce and bloody battles of the war, nicknamed the “Punchbowl” by a US war correspondent who said the area resembled a cocktail glass.”The South Korean and UN forces had to cross our village in order to advance northwards,” explained tour guide and villager Lee Byeong-deuk. Topics :last_img read more

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Aviva to compensate preference share investors with £14m payment

first_imgAviva is to make a one-off goodwill payment of £14m (€16m) to shareholders who lost money when the FTSE 100 insurer announced plans in March to cancel £450m worth of preference shares.Investors who held the shares saw the value of their holdings drop in the wake of the announcement – which the insurer subsequently moved to cancel following what Aviva described as “strong feedback and criticism”.This morning the company – which owns the £352bn asset manager Aviva Investors – said it would offer a “discretionary goodwill payment” for those who had sold their shares at a loss between 8 March and 22 March inclusively.“This goodwill payment is intended to put those shareholders in the same financial position they would have been in had they sold their preference shares following the 23 March announcement, rather than the first announcement,” the company said in a statement. An estimated 2,000 individual investors sold their preference shares between 8 March and 22 March.Mark Wilson, group chief executive officer of Aviva, said the aim of the payment was to “do the right thing”.He added: “We accept that whatever action we take, we will continue to hear divergent views on this topic from various stakeholders.  However, together with our previous announcement not to proceed with the cancellation of the preference shares, we hope this goodwill payment goes some way to restoring trust in Aviva.”The insurer currently faces a review of its actions by the UK regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) – although chief executive Andrew Bailey has emphasised that it was not yet conducting a formal investigation.However, the FCA has written to companies that have issued preference shares in an attempt to foster greater awareness among investors of any factors that might affect the value of their investments.Companies issuing preference shares should ensure their investors were in possession of all the facts, Bailey wrote in the letter, including access to terms and conditions and being kept abreast of any changes.last_img read more

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Fears over potential sex tourism in the Pacific

first_imgAustralian Network News 25 Sept 2013An international organisation protecting children from sexual exploitation says the Pacific could soon become a major hub for sex trafficking and sex tourism if governments fail to take preventative action.The New Zealand arm of the child rights network ECPAT International warns the Pacific’s booming tourism industry could potentially lead to the rise in sex tourism.EPCAT’s national director Alan Bell has told Radio Australia’s Pacific Beat more attention needs to be paid to the potential risks involved and corrective measures need to be taken.“It’s much better to address these issues with prevention rather than deal with the results,” he said.“In any country, not just in the Pacific, where there is tourism, there is often sex tourism associated with it…with tourism increasing across the Pacific, I think the time is right for the Pacific to be looking at this.http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-25/fears-over-potential-for-sex-trafficking-pacific/4979606last_img read more

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Referee clinic part of a strategic plan to develop the sport of basketball in Dominica.

first_imgCoach Edwin Pena Ramos seated on the left and President of DABA, Dave Baron beside him.President of the Dominica Amateur Basketball Association, Dave Baron says the association is working on staging a Referee Clinic as part of its strategic plan to develop the sport of basketball on the island.“We at the Association, we did a very extensive strategic plan last year and one of our strategic plans was the coaching clinic and we’ve seen that through. We can expect another one of the other projects that we working on, a referee clinic. I know that with the Coaching Clinic there must be a Referee Clinic to improve the sport of basketball.”Mr. Baron who was addressing the closing ceremony of the one week Coaching Clinic facilitated by Coach Edwin Pena Ramos of International Federation (FIBA) said although the Referee Clinic might not last an entire week as the Coaching Clinic did, it will be an extensive program for the referees and table officials.“It probably might not be an entire week but at least we’ll have an extensive programme we can improve on our officiators. The Referee Clinic will encompass not just the referees themselves but the table officials will form an integral part of the basketball development.”According to Mr. Baron the recently concluded Coaching Clinic is a stepping stone in realizing the organization of a mini basketball programme.“We’re also looking at starting our mini basketball program and I think that what we did here this week is a stepping stone towards realizing that mini basketball program because in order that we teach the young ones the proper way to play basketball we have to ensure that our coaches are properly trained in that respect. We spent the entire week working on different ways we can develop the sport, different ways we can develop the players, the younger ones and so on, so we can look towards getting our mini basketball program off the ground from there on.”Dominica Vibes News Tweet NewsSports Referee clinic part of a strategic plan to develop the sport of basketball in Dominica. by: – August 5, 2011 Share 34 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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Police Blotter 01-25-2020

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